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NOACA Study Details Dangers of Downtown Cleveland Streets, Paves Way for Solutions

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NOACA Study Details Dangers of Downtown Cleveland Streets, Paves Way for Solutions


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Mark Oprea

Cyclists downtown last summer. A recent study by NOACA teased bike lanes in Cleveland’s future.

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Last Friday, in a boardroom at the Northeast Ohio Area Coordinating Agency, a team of transportation consultants from Columbus detailed the culmination of three years of studies done on the streets of Downtown Cleveland.

The results, in a 45-slide presentation, clarified the area’s need for a makeover: To put roughly 80 percent of its streets on a road diet—shortening their widths. To build center medians on those like East 9th. To link bike lane pathways already in planning stages.

“You can see a little bit of a network forming, but not a lot,” Steve Thieken, a planning specialist at Burgess & Niple, the firm responsible for the study, said at last week’s meeting, according to Cleveland.com. “Compared to peer cities, many have a more completed system.”

What the end product of NOACA’s three-year Downtown Livability and Transportation Study does, besides acknowledge Downtown’s gaping lack of safe bike lane infrastructure, is two-fold.

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Besides laying foreshadowing framework for the City Mobility Plan, NOACA’s downtown overlook—which cost a quarter of a million dollars—will enable the Mayor’s Office of Capital Projects, and other departments, to pinpoint and better apply for state and federal funds that could, one day, pave way for actual construction.

Which, the study pointed out, carries both elements of contemporary design and a glowing need to remake streets into safer transportation routes. Along with a meaty proposal for, say, throwing a center lane and bike path onto the four-to-six lane beast that is East 9th St., the study found that 40 percent of those surveyed regularly felt unsafe riding bikes or scooters.

NOACA’s notch in Cleveland’s pursuit of more modern street design contributes to a growing narrative for what the city itself could look like in the next decade, as more gradually come further in line under a principle becoming more obvious: we need to right the wrongs of past planning decisions.

Or, as a slide labeled “Untapped”in Friday’s presentation put it: “Many downtown streets are designed for rush hour and special event traffic, which can lead to higher vehicle speeds during non-peak hours.” In other words, infrastructure drives behavior.

“People have to remember that streets aren’t only for automobiles,” NOACA President Grace Gallucci told Scene in a call Thursday. “And that’s how you have to discuss this with people for [these plans] to make sense. And I mean, people who are driving want to be safe too.”

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click to enlarge Where bike lanes are—and are not—downtown, in teal, blue and pink, a slide from NOACA's presentation last week showed. - Burgess & Niple

Burgess & Niple

Where bike lanes are—and are not—downtown, in teal, blue and pink, a slide from NOACA’s presentation last week showed.

click to enlarge Where bike lanes and shortened streets could be or will be in Cleveland's future. - Burgess & Niple

Burgess & Niple

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Where bike lanes and shortened streets could be or will be in Cleveland’s future.

And just as long as NOACA’s been developing its study—and much, much longer in Greater Cleveland lore—ideas on which Downtown streets to overhaul have been gathering.

As its study teased last Friday, those ideas are wide-ranging: six total cycle tracks on Downtown’s east side; a bike trail that runs from Public Square to Progressive Field; an East 9th Greenspace Corridor that links Downtown’s front door to the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame.

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“Oh, that’s such an unpleasant experience,” Audrey Gerlach, the VP of economic development for Downtown Cleveland, Inc., a partner in NOACA’s study, said. “I don’t want to push a stroller, or a wheelchair [down East 9th], even as an able-bodied person.”

“To me, this is definitely not an if but a when,” Gerlach added. “Consultants in town to study this is important—but we all instinctively know that East 9th is dangerous.”

As for actually making East 9th safer, and not just more aesthetically pleasing with tree lines and median refuges (resting spots in the middle of crosswalks), only City Hall itself is in the jurisdiction to bring Downtown’s streets into the 21st century.

Calley Mersmann, a senior strategist for transportation and member of the city’s Mobility Team, told Scene that the study she helped steer over the past three years has real world applications as far as bankrolling projects to enhance Downtown’s walkability. Mersmann suggested that the Mayor’s Office of Capital Projects, along with other departments, could leverage said study into grant funding from—ironically—NOACA’s own Transportation for Livable Communities Initiative. (Up to $2 million a year, though.)

“Because this plan exists,” she put it simply, “we can tap into that.”

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As for the Mobility Plan, which could include a network of unified bike lanes across the city, that should be released to the public by early 2025.

NOACA’s study …

“This plan kind of took those ideas to the next step by instituting them as recommendations,” she said.

Her colleague, and active transportation planner, Sarah Davis agreed. “It’s helpful to have that zoomed in perspective as we’re going into this citywide,” Davis said. “And to be able to focus in more specifically. That this is out there, and people are thinking about it.”

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Cleveland, OH

Cleveland Innovation District Partners Exceeding Many Targets Set by State and JobsOhio

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Cleveland Innovation District Partners Exceeding Many Targets Set by State and JobsOhio


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Since the Cleveland Innovation District launched in 2021, the founding institutions have made significant progress, including exceeding many of the targets set by the Ohio Department of Development and JobsOhio. Collectively, the institutions participating in this $500 million public-private initiative have created more than 2,600 jobs, spent nearly $1.2 billion on research and innovation, commenced construction of two new research facilities, created dedicated research space comprising more than 550,000 square feet, and awarded more than 7,300 degrees and certificates to support workforce development.

“The Cleveland Innovation District’s progress over the last three years has been remarkable,” said Governor Mike DeWine. “Ohio is a world leader in innovative healthcare and research, and I’m confident we’ll continue to see life-changing medical advancements from the talented teams that are part of the Cleveland Innovation District.”

Through the Cleveland Innovation District (CID), the partners — Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland State University, The MetroHealth System and University Hospitals — in collaboration with the Ohio Department of Development and JobsOhio aim to contribute $3 billion to the regional economy by 2030. They plan to achieve this by generating 20,000 direct and indirect jobs that will result from increased investment in research and product innovation, construction spending and furthering the educational profile of our Northeast Ohio community.

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“When we launched the Innovation District, it was our aspiration that it would generate more jobs, more STEM talent and more research and investment funding to solidify Cleveland as an international health research center of excellence, and it is encouraging to see that we are making progress toward those goals,” said Lt. Governor Jon Husted, director of InnovateOhio. “These interim reports provide an opportunity to celebrate milestones, while holding all of the partners accountable for delivering on what was promised.”

“The Cleveland Innovation District is poised to be a center of excellence that acts as a catalyst for ongoing investment in Northeast Ohio,” said JobsOhio President and CEO J.P. Nauseef. “This extraordinary collaboration showcases the region’s world-class research and learning institutions as the Cleveland Innovation District attracts and creates new businesses and talent needed to ensure the state is a global leader in the healthcare and IT sectors.”

“The Cleveland Innovation District is a great example of how a community can come together to advance technology and innovation and drive economic growth and transformation throughout Ohio,” said Lydia Mihalik, director of the Department of Development. “The progress they’ve made so far is a testament to what’s possible when great minds converge with a shared vision for progress. Their accomplishments are actively shaping the future workforce and empowering individuals with the skills needs to thrive in the heart of innovation.”

“It has been an immense privilege to witness the remarkable synergy among our anchor partners,” said Cliff A. Megerian, MD, FACS, Current Chair of the Cleveland Innovation District and CEO of University Hospitals. “Together, we have coalesced into a dynamic force, achieving significant milestones since the launch in 2021. The progress we’ve made underscores our collective commitment to elevating the region. I look forward to continuing this extraordinary journey, working hand-in-hand with our partners and the entire community, as we propel the Cleveland Innovation District to even greater heights.”

Milestones achieved by the five institutions since their last update in 2021 include:

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Case Western Reserve University:

  • With a priority to grow its research portfolio to $600 million as soon as possible, Case Western Reserve University is moving quickly toward that goal, reporting to the federal government FY23 research expenditures of $554 million.
  • To support researchers and their expanded research portfolios, Case Western Reserve is also investing in infrastructure. The university is about to break ground on its state-of-the-art $300 million, 200,000-square-foot Interdisciplinary Science and Engineering Building (ISEB), scheduled to open in fall 2026.
  • CWRU is elevating technology translation and catalyzing the innovation ecosystem with the development of a new start-up incubator designed for 40 early-stage businesses in the biotech, health tech, and engineering fields.
  • CWRU has embarked on a major strategic initiative to add 100 net new tenured and tenure-track faculty positions — an integrated effort across the university and across a variety of resource pools to enhance the impact of university activity.

Cleveland Clinic:

  • Began construction of two new research buildings, totaling approximately 300,000 square feet, on Cedar Avenue in CID. The state-of-the-art facilities, which will be home to the Sheikha Fatima bint Mubarak Global Center for Pathogen & Human Health Research, will significantly increase laboratory research space on Cleveland Clinic’s main campus.
  • Opened the first research facilities on main campus dedicated to the Cleveland Innovation District. Several of Cleveland Clinic’s fastest-growing research programs moved into the 45,000 square feet of modern laboratory and computational space, including the Center for Computational Life Sciences, Center for Immunotherapy and Precision Immuno-oncology and Center for Therapeutics Discovery.
  • Commissioned a new biosafety level 3 laboratory for sophisticated pathogen research, operating under stringent biosafety protocols set by the Centers for Disease Control. The lab provides an important resource for scientists to safely develop diagnostics, treatments and vaccines to prevent and treat current and future infectious diseases.
  • Created nearly 2,000 new jobs since 2021 related to the CID, exceeding the goal of 1,000 new full-time equivalency employees. In collaboration with Cleveland State University, Cleveland Clinic has created courses and degrees for new workforce demands.Since 2021, there have been more than 2,000 degrees supported and certificates that were awarded in programs such as phlebotomy, cardiac ultrasound and diagnostic medical sonography.
  • Cleveland Clinic formed research partnerships with IBM in addition to Canon. Together with IBM, Cleveland Clinic on its main campus opened the first quantum computer dedicated to healthcare. The research teams have launched more than 50 research projects leveraging advanced computing technologies and begun publishing results.
  • In 2023, Cleveland Clinic received $435 million in research funding, which supported more than 3,700 active research projects.

Cleveland State University:

  • Awarded a total of 2,031 degrees in STEM/CS programs in the first three years of the project; and 3,270 certificate programs in workforce development fields have been completed.
  • Saw a 27% increase in the number of students enrolled in the 16 degree programs targeted by JobsOhio over the 2019 academic year baseline. Year-over-year retention of first year undergraduate and master’s students has increased by eight points.
  • Two hundred organizations employed students in co-op/internships from JobsOhio-targeted programs for Year 2 (Su22/F22/Sp23), an increase of 115% from the previous year.
  • In May 2023, 457 students graduated from the JobsOhio-targeted STEM/CS programs at the bachelor’s, master’s and PhD levels. Of the 351 students who responded to our survey, 86% found professional employment related to their field of study, and 7% are pursuing additional education, indicating that the demand for graduates with these STEM/CS degrees remains high.
  • Hosted a total of 778 middle school and high school students in STEM-related summer camps in the previous two years.

The MetroHealth System:

University Hospitals:

  • Attained $197 million in annual research funding, eclipsing the JobsOhio milestone goal by 15% and last year’s actual by 11%.
  • Signed a 10-year agreement with Oxford University, launching the Oxford-Harrington Rare Disease Centre Therapeutics Acceleratorto find cures for rare diseases.
  • Managed more than 3,400 active clinical trials and research studies with a 20% increase in patient enrollment year over year. For example, there is a multi-institutional effort that includes The MetroHealth System, Cleveland Clinic and University Hospitals to identify underserved populations within Northeast Ohio and leverage hypertension data to serve our surrounding communities with the right resources and preventative care.
  • The National Institutes of Health awarded Dr. Grace McComsey and Case Western Reserve University’s CTSC a seven-year, $56.3 million grant renewal in 2023 to advance initiatives that improve people’s health in Northern Ohio and beyond. The CTSC also added the University of Toledo and Northeast Ohio Medical University to its collaborative that included Cleveland Clinic, The MetroHealth System, University Hospitals and the VA Northeast Ohio Healthcare System.
  • Expanded the Wesley Center for Immunotherapy by more than 10,000 square feet, where in conjunction with UH Seidman Cancer Center, we havelaunched a clinical trial in which an “in-house” CAR T-cell therapy is manufactured within 24 to 48hrs
  • Exceeded 10 year job creation targets by 80%.
  • Established the UH Radiology A.I. & Diagnostic Innovation Collaborative (RadiCLE) — an artificial intelligence hub that already paved the way for FDA-approval of fracture detection software by AZMed.

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NBA: Finals-Golden State Warriors at Cleveland Cavaliers – Awful Announcing

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NBA: Finals-Golden State Warriors at Cleveland Cavaliers – Awful Announcing


June 8, 2018; Cleveland, OH, USA; Cleveland Cavaliers center Kendrick Perkins (21) during the second quarter in game four of the 2018 NBA Finals against the Golden State Warriors at Quicken Loans Arena. The Warriors defeated the Cavaliers 108-85 to complete a four-game sweep. Mandatory Credit: Kyle Terada-USA TODAY Sports



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Now’s your chance! Apply to be an extra in James Gunn’s new ‘Superman’ movie filming in Cleveland

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Now’s your chance! Apply to be an extra in James Gunn’s new ‘Superman’ movie filming in Cleveland


CLEVELAND, Ohio (WOIO) – Warner Bros’ new Superman movie will be filming in Cleveland and Cincinnati in the coming months, and a Northeast Ohio casting agency released details this week about how you can be cast an extra.

Angela Boehm Casting posted details on their social media Tuesday about the project’s shoot dates, hourly rates and much more.

The project, listed under the code name “Genesis,” will shoot in Cleveland from June 17 to July 16. They will also shoot in Cincinnati on July 17 and 18.

Background rate for the film starts at $12/hour, with a guarantee of eight hours.

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The post also outlined other rates and needs, such as stand-ins and children.

The general interest form for those looking to apply also asks about schedule conflicts, sizes and other optional roles.

According to the film’s Ohio tax application, “Superman,” or “Genesis” which was the early title of the film, was allowed to start pre-production earlier this year on February 5.

The application lists the production-related budget as $363,845,386. The film will be awarded $11,091,686.70 in tax credit from the Ohio Motion Picture Tax Credit.

Though the film is listed under a code name, “Superman” is the true project based on the director listed, James Gunn, the cast list, including David Corenswet, Rachel Brosnahan, and Nathan Fillian, and the production company S&K Pictures, Inc, which is a subsidiary of Warner Bros.

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The application reveals 25% of the total production will be filmed in Ohio. Though the application does not yet list specific addresses, the two Ohio filming locations are listed as Cleveland and Cincinnati.

Production is expected to take place between April 1 and August 23.

19 News has reached out to the Cleveland Film Commission for details on filming locations, job and acting opportunities and they released the following statement:

Back in 1938, the very first Superman comic book was created by Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster, two Clevelanders, to help people get through the Great Depression.

James Gunn announced last November “Superman” will hit theaters on July 11, 2025.

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