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What does rebellious style look like? Enter artist Saturn Risin9

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What does rebellious style look like? Enter artist Saturn Risin9

A bag becomes a different thing entirely when worn by different personalities — similar to how no one perfume smells the same on two different people. To test out this idea, we invited four different artists to style the same bag into their personal look and lifestyle for one day, dreaming up places across L.A. where they would wear it. The bag? The Acne Studios rivet wine box bag from the brand’s spring/summer ’24 collection. It felt like a bag tough enough to withstand a long day in L.A. and lightweight enough to not drag you down.

In the second installment of the series, Saturn Risin9, a singer, performer and DJ, takes the bag to Pirate Studios, where she practices DJ sets ahead of the weekend. With the Acne bag in tow, the multi-hyphenate shows us how their personal style is a reflection of “ambition, being daring, being exciting, and how to bring those things together.”

Who are you and what do you do?

I’m a multihyphenate. I’m a performer, a singer, a DJ, I throw events. I have a charity, Rings Alliance, for trans and queer artists. We’re still getting our footing but you’ll be hearing more about that soon.

Describe your personal style.

I’ve always been really rebellious. And my mom says she knew the moment that she was pregnant with me that I was going to only do what I wanted. I think my style reflects that. Even the things that you would think I would care about — like what’s trending, what the standard of fashion or music is — I never really care. If it hits me, I wear it. And if it sounds good to me, I do it, because I can make anything work. I mean that in life as well as in my music and also in my style. I think my self, my work and personal style all reflect someone that works really hard for themselves and by themselves. It’s a reflection of ambition, being daring, being exciting, and how to bring those things together because it is really remarkable to do that in a world that does not champion and welcome that. (I’m blessed to have found a community and a personal world that does.) My style reflects that person, and my effort toward being great and having fun.

Saturn wears a Tommy Hilfiger jacket, Amazon bodysuit and boots from Maya Shoes of Hollywood. Makeup by Saturn Risin9.

Saturn Risin9 wearing the Acne Studios rivet wine box bag at Pirate Studios.

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I think my self, my work and personal style all reflect someone that works really hard for themselves and by themselves.

— Performer, singer and DJ Saturn Risin9

Talk to me about dreaming up an outfit around this Acne Studios bag.

For the last few years I’ve really been into these really small bags that don’t have a lot of space — I love a clutch size. So when I saw the bag I was excited because it was more spacious and had this rectangular shape so I knew that I could fit a lot of things in it, which meant that I had more options to wear things that allowed for a sleek [look]. I don’t have to wear pockets because my purse can hold it all, so I have these thigh-high boots on. I definitely thought about how flexible [the bag] would be for going out or even traveling because I don’t like to travel with a lot. I like to have as much as I can fit in my purse and still be sexy, cute and ready to go.

How does sense of place inform sense of style? How do you travel through L.A. with style in mind?

I’m usually in what I like to call butch-wares. I definitely like to be comfy when I travel through L.A., especially in the daytime — I’m not trying to put on a look. I also don’t want to be bogged down by the idea that dolls [trans women] need to present super feminine or hyper-femme to be able to pass through life. Passability is not even a concern for me. I just try to be as comfortable as possible because I’m doing so much at all times — why would I want to be uncomfortable on top of working as hard as I work? But, there’s nothing more c— than having a fab bag on you. Sweats or not, a fab bag is a fab bag. Like, actually, let me dress more bummy and pull out the Acne bag.

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Saturn Rising for a "Style It Yourself" feature in Image's April 2024 issue. (Bishop Elegino / For The Times)

Producer: Mere Studios
Makeup: Saturn Risin9
Hair: Malcom Marquez

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J. Kenji López-Alt talks food, science, and Winnie the Pooh onsies : Wait Wait… Don't Tell Me!

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J. Kenji López-Alt talks food, science, and Winnie the Pooh onsies : Wait Wait… Don't Tell Me!
This week, we’re live in Seattle with food genius J. Kenji López-Alt to talk about food, science, food-science, and the magic of Winnie the Pooh onsies. Plus, panelists Shantira Jackson, Luke Burbank, and Jessi Klein pass the blame around.WWDTM+ listeners! For contractual reasons, there will not be a sponsor-free version of this episode. We apologize. But we will have a sponsor-free program available to you as always next weekend. We appreciate your support!
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Stars Kick Off Summer With Memorial Day Fun in the Sun

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Stars Kick Off Summer With Memorial Day Fun in the Sun

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What’s better for the climate: A paper book, or an e-reader?

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What’s better for the climate: A paper book, or an e-reader?

In the face of human-caused climate change, paperbacks and e-readers each have pros and cons.

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JGI/Daniel Grill/Getty Images

The summer reading season is here.

Some people will opt for paperbacks because they’re easy to borrow and share. Others will go for e-readers, or audiobooks streamed on a phone.

But which is the more environmentally sustainable option? Reading’s carbon footprint is not large compared to other things people do, like travel, and it isn’t something most people consider when choosing how to read a book. But for those looking for small changes in their lives to reduce their impact on the climate, it might be worth exploring how the ways we choose to read books affect the planet.

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A complicated question to answer

Whether it’s better to read books in print or on a device is complicated, because of the complex interplay of the resources involved across the entire lifecycle of a published work: how books and devices are shipped, what energy they use to run, if they can be recycled.

Digital reading is on the rise — especially audiobooks. According to the Association of American Publishers, they now capture about the same share of the total US book market as e-books — roughly 15%. But print is still by far the most popular format.

“Publishers are interested in preserving the business that they’ve created over hundreds of years,” said Publishers Weekly executive editor Andrew Albanese, explaining why the industry is focusing most of its efforts on improving the sustainability of paperback and hardcover books, rather than digital formats. “They are looking to run those print book businesses as efficiently as possible, as cleanly as possible, as green as possible.”

On the one side: traditional book publishing

Traditional print publishing comes with a high carbon footprint.

According to 2023 data from the literary industry research group WordsRated, when it comes to pulp and paper, print book publishing is the world’s third-largest industrial greenhouse gas emitter, and 32 million trees are felled each year in the United States to make paper for books. Then there’s the printing and shipping — to say nothing of the many books that are destroyed because they remain unsold.

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Although it’s standard practice in the industry, publishers don’t want to destroy books. So instead, many are donating unsold copies, switching to on-demand printing, or, like Chronicle Books, are reducing their initial print runs to see how well the titles sell before they print more.

“We felt that it was better to have a higher cost and have less waste,” said Chronicle Books president, Tyrrell Mahoney.

Chronicle Books, like many other publishers, is also trying to use more sustainable paper.

“We have this great partner in India who has now figured out how to use cotton-based up-cycled materials to print as paper,” Mahoney said.

Publishers are also rethinking book design. It might be a surprise, but certain fonts can be more climate-friendly by using less ink and less paper.

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A side-by-side comparison of one of Harper Collins' new sustainable fonts (right) and a regular font (left.)

Harper Collins has introduced sustainable fonts that use less ink.

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“So far, these subtle, imperceptible tweaks have saved more than 200 million pages across 227 titles since September,” said Harper Collins’ senior director of design Lucy Albanese. NPR could not independently verify these page savings.

On the other: digital publishing

All well and good. But digital reading seems to have a considerable eco-advantage over print because it is paperless, so it saves trees, pulping and shipping. Moreover, tech companies that make e-readers such as Amazon, which sells the market-leading Kindle e-reader, offer recycling programs for old devices.

“By choosing e-books as an alternative to print, Kindle readers helped save an estimated 2.3 million metric tons of carbon emissions over a two year period,” said Corey Badcock, head of Kindle product and marketing. NPR could not independently verify these emissions reductions.

But digital devices also come with a substantial carbon footprint, predominantly at the manufacturing stage. Their cases are made with fossil-fuel-derived plastics and the minerals in their batteries require resource-heavy mining.

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The short answer to which is better: it depends

“It’s not cut and dried,” said Mike Berners-Lee, a professor of sustainability at Lancaster Environment Centre in the United Kingdom, of the comparative climate friendliness of digital versus print reading.

Berners-Lee, the author of The Carbon Footprint of Everything, said the average e-reader has a carbon footprint of around 80 pounds.

“This means that I’ve got to read about 36 small paperback books-worth on it before you break even,” he said.

Figuring out whether to take a digital device or a paperback to the beach ultimately depends on how voraciously you read.

“If you buy an e-reader and you read loads and loads of books on it, then it’s the lowest carbon thing to do,” Berners-Lee said. “But if I buy it, read a couple of books, and decided that I prefer paperback books, then it’s the worst of all worlds.”

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Yet Berners-Lee said that reading is still, relatively speaking, a pretty sustainable activity — regardless of whether you read using an e-reader, phone or old-fashioned paperback.

Both audio and digital versions of this story were edited by Jennifer Vanasco. Isabella Gomez-Sarmiento mixed the audio version.

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