Connect with us

Lifestyle

Get ready with Bey: Beyoncé teases out Cécred critics by highlighting her wash-day ritual

Published

on

Get ready with Bey: Beyoncé teases out Cécred critics by highlighting her wash-day ritual

Get ready with Bey: Beyoncé shared a rare behind-the-scenes look at her wash-day routine on Monday, dismissing those who criticize her haircare-line credentials with an up-close look at her natural tresses.

The ultra-private “Cowboy Carter” crooner hopped on the viral haircare trend and posted a nearly two-minute clip taking followers through the multistep process of caring for her color-treated tresses. In it, she explained how she maintains her textured blond hair with her seven-product regimen (and other tools) and subtly flexed about her “long and healthy” hair.

“It has been such a special experience seeing all of your #cecredwashday rituals all over my timeline… I just had to join in with something I had in the archives 🥰,” the Cécred founder wrote on Instagram, setting her founder video to her new “Bodyguard” track.

“Being disruptive and challenging everything people feel should be the process has always been exciting to me. My hair and music seemed to do that a lot over the years…,” she wrote. “Maintaining 25 years of blonde on natural hair through all the experimenting I do has played a huge part in developing @cecred’s products. It’s the hardest to keep color-treated hair healthy and strong, but @cecred is here. All quality, with NO shortcuts. Congratulations to the entire CÉCRED team for contributing to developing award-winning products. 💕 Happy #cecredwashday! You are CÉCRED.”

Advertisement

The Grammy winner, who launched her luxury line in February, added that she’s really proud of the quality of her products. And, seated in various salon chairs through the tutorial, she took fans through washing, conditioning and styling her locks. She said that she blow-dries her hair on medium heat using a Dyson Airwrap attachment, flat irons it and uses “an old-school pressing comb” to straighten her curly hair.

“My hair has never grown so long, never been so moisturized and I’ve managed to keep my texture and my curls even with my hair so blond. And my hair is flourishing,” she said in the voice-over.

The multihyphenate, who grew up sweeping up hair in mom Tina Knowles’ salon, also seemed to address the criticism has she received since launching her haircare line, specifically complaints that she doesn’t showcase her natural hair and others who opine about her hair journey.

“The stigma and misconception that people who wear wigs don’t have long and healthy hair. That’s some b—,” she crooned, “because it ain’t nobody business.”

Advertisement

On the official Cécred Instagram account, the brand said that the line “exists so anyone has the opportunity to show up how they choose. There’s no better way to celebrate that than with our founder, @beyonce sharing her own.”

Followers eagerly took to the comments section of Bey’s Instagram posts to weigh in on her reveal and subtle clapback.

“Woke up and called us all baldheaded straight to our face. And we ain’t gone do SHH about it! PERIOD! 💁🏾‍♀️” wrote attorney and content creator Blake Gifford.

“DAAAYYUUUMMM!!!! & that’s on PERIOD!! Beyoncé Translation: Now shut up! 😂😂👏🏽👏🏽👏🏽👏🏽👏🏽” added curly hair influencer Bianca Renee. “People love to hate on wigs but it’s low key the best way to protect your natural hair!! By just leaving it alone! You can HAVE hair and take care of that hair that’s UNDER the wig!!! 🙌🏽🙌🏽🙌🏽 Much respect for this video!! ❤️”

“I love to see it! Show them better than you can tell them. . . every time,” commented TV personality Alicia Quarles.

Advertisement

“BEYONCÉ… A HAIR TUTORIAL?! WITH A VOICEOVER?! I’M FINNA CRY 😭😭😭” added a fan.

“She REALLY SAID “now look around everybody on MUTE! 🔇 🤫 🤐 “ added another.

Upon launching the brand, the “Break My Soul” and “Texas Hold ’Em” singer told Essence that she struggled with psoriasis during her childhood.

“The relationship we have with our hair is such a deeply personal journey,” she told the magazine.

“From spending my childhood in my mother’s salon to my father applying oil on my scalp to treat my psoriasis— these moments have been sacred to me,” she recalled, before saying the line is an ode to salons and barbershops, and to the communities they help foster.

Advertisement

She also said that she finds hair — in any style — powerful and an important part of self-expression, especially for Black people, whose hair has been the subject of legislation, scrutiny and celebration.

“For me, joy comes from making myself a priority and making my hair a priority,” said Beyoncé. “It is really important for me to make time for the sacred rituals of self-care.”

Times staff writer Alexandra Del Rosario contributed to this report.

Advertisement
Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Lifestyle

J. Kenji López-Alt talks food, science, and Winnie the Pooh onsies : Wait Wait… Don't Tell Me!

Published

on

J. Kenji López-Alt talks food, science, and Winnie the Pooh onsies : Wait Wait… Don't Tell Me!
This week, we’re live in Seattle with food genius J. Kenji López-Alt to talk about food, science, food-science, and the magic of Winnie the Pooh onsies. Plus, panelists Shantira Jackson, Luke Burbank, and Jessi Klein pass the blame around.WWDTM+ listeners! For contractual reasons, there will not be a sponsor-free version of this episode. We apologize. But we will have a sponsor-free program available to you as always next weekend. We appreciate your support!
Continue Reading

Lifestyle

Stars Kick Off Summer With Memorial Day Fun in the Sun

Published

on

Stars Kick Off Summer With Memorial Day Fun in the Sun

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

Continue Reading

Lifestyle

What’s better for the climate: A paper book, or an e-reader?

Published

on

What’s better for the climate: A paper book, or an e-reader?

In the face of human-caused climate change, paperbacks and e-readers each have pros and cons.

JGI/Daniel Grill/Getty Images


hide caption

toggle caption

Advertisement

JGI/Daniel Grill/Getty Images

The summer reading season is here.

Some people will opt for paperbacks because they’re easy to borrow and share. Others will go for e-readers, or audiobooks streamed on a phone.

But which is the more environmentally sustainable option? Reading’s carbon footprint is not large compared to other things people do, like travel, and it isn’t something most people consider when choosing how to read a book. But for those looking for small changes in their lives to reduce their impact on the climate, it might be worth exploring how the ways we choose to read books affect the planet.

Advertisement

A complicated question to answer

Whether it’s better to read books in print or on a device is complicated, because of the complex interplay of the resources involved across the entire lifecycle of a published work: how books and devices are shipped, what energy they use to run, if they can be recycled.

Digital reading is on the rise — especially audiobooks. According to the Association of American Publishers, they now capture about the same share of the total US book market as e-books — roughly 15%. But print is still by far the most popular format.

“Publishers are interested in preserving the business that they’ve created over hundreds of years,” said Publishers Weekly executive editor Andrew Albanese, explaining why the industry is focusing most of its efforts on improving the sustainability of paperback and hardcover books, rather than digital formats. “They are looking to run those print book businesses as efficiently as possible, as cleanly as possible, as green as possible.”

On the one side: traditional book publishing

Traditional print publishing comes with a high carbon footprint.

According to 2023 data from the literary industry research group WordsRated, when it comes to pulp and paper, print book publishing is the world’s third-largest industrial greenhouse gas emitter, and 32 million trees are felled each year in the United States to make paper for books. Then there’s the printing and shipping — to say nothing of the many books that are destroyed because they remain unsold.

Advertisement

Although it’s standard practice in the industry, publishers don’t want to destroy books. So instead, many are donating unsold copies, switching to on-demand printing, or, like Chronicle Books, are reducing their initial print runs to see how well the titles sell before they print more.

“We felt that it was better to have a higher cost and have less waste,” said Chronicle Books president, Tyrrell Mahoney.

Chronicle Books, like many other publishers, is also trying to use more sustainable paper.

“We have this great partner in India who has now figured out how to use cotton-based up-cycled materials to print as paper,” Mahoney said.

Publishers are also rethinking book design. It might be a surprise, but certain fonts can be more climate-friendly by using less ink and less paper.

Advertisement
A side-by-side comparison of one of Harper Collins' new sustainable fonts (right) and a regular font (left.)

Harper Collins has introduced sustainable fonts that use less ink.

Harper Collins/Harper Collins


hide caption

toggle caption

Harper Collins/Harper Collins

Advertisement

“So far, these subtle, imperceptible tweaks have saved more than 200 million pages across 227 titles since September,” said Harper Collins’ senior director of design Lucy Albanese. NPR could not independently verify these page savings.

On the other: digital publishing

All well and good. But digital reading seems to have a considerable eco-advantage over print because it is paperless, so it saves trees, pulping and shipping. Moreover, tech companies that make e-readers such as Amazon, which sells the market-leading Kindle e-reader, offer recycling programs for old devices.

“By choosing e-books as an alternative to print, Kindle readers helped save an estimated 2.3 million metric tons of carbon emissions over a two year period,” said Corey Badcock, head of Kindle product and marketing. NPR could not independently verify these emissions reductions.

But digital devices also come with a substantial carbon footprint, predominantly at the manufacturing stage. Their cases are made with fossil-fuel-derived plastics and the minerals in their batteries require resource-heavy mining.

Advertisement

The short answer to which is better: it depends

“It’s not cut and dried,” said Mike Berners-Lee, a professor of sustainability at Lancaster Environment Centre in the United Kingdom, of the comparative climate friendliness of digital versus print reading.

Berners-Lee, the author of The Carbon Footprint of Everything, said the average e-reader has a carbon footprint of around 80 pounds.

“This means that I’ve got to read about 36 small paperback books-worth on it before you break even,” he said.

Figuring out whether to take a digital device or a paperback to the beach ultimately depends on how voraciously you read.

“If you buy an e-reader and you read loads and loads of books on it, then it’s the lowest carbon thing to do,” Berners-Lee said. “But if I buy it, read a couple of books, and decided that I prefer paperback books, then it’s the worst of all worlds.”

Advertisement

Yet Berners-Lee said that reading is still, relatively speaking, a pretty sustainable activity — regardless of whether you read using an e-reader, phone or old-fashioned paperback.

Both audio and digital versions of this story were edited by Jennifer Vanasco. Isabella Gomez-Sarmiento mixed the audio version.

Continue Reading

Trending