Connect with us

Health

Young girl survives cancer thanks to little sister’s lifesaving donation: 'A perfect match'

Published

on

Young girl survives cancer thanks to little sister’s lifesaving donation: 'A perfect match'

Join Fox News for access to this content

You have reached your maximum number of articles. Log in or create an account FREE of charge to continue reading.

Please enter a valid email address.

By entering your email and pushing continue, you are agreeing to Fox News’ Terms of Use and Privacy Policy, which includes our Notice of Financial Incentive. To access the content, check your email and follow the instructions provided.

Having trouble? Click here.

A young girl in the U.K. is in cancer remission thanks to her sister’s lifesaving bone marrow donation.

Ruby Leaning, 10, was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia after collapsing on the school playground in Jan. 2020, according to SWNS, the British news service.

Advertisement

The rare blood cancer required an urgent bone marrow transplant to keep the 6-year-old alive.

AI COULD PREDICT WHETHER CANCER TREATMENTS WILL WORK, EXPERTS SAY

After several tests, Leaning’s then 2-year-old sister, Mabel Leaning, came up as a “perfect match.”

The Leaning sisters’ grandmother, Amanda Fawcett, confirmed to SWNS that Ruby Leaning received treatment with Mabel Leaning’s stem cells.

Sisters Mabel Leaning, left, and Ruby Leaning hold hands in the hospital. The younger sister saved the older one with a bone marrow transplant. (Amanda Fawcett via SWNS)

Advertisement

Ruby Leaning was declared cancer-free in 2022 — meaning Mabel Leaning “saved Ruby’s life for sure,” Fawcett said.

“She’s a happy, normal and healthy 10-year-old who loves swimming, dancing and piano lessons.”

“We [weren’t] expecting her to be a match at first, but thankfully she was, so we just couldn’t believe our luck,” she said. 

“It was amazing – we were so thankful.”

SOME BREAST CANCER PATIENTS COULD BE AT RISK OF ANOTHER TYPE OF CANCER, STUDY REVEALS

Advertisement

Fawcett recalled the moment her granddaughter was diagnosed with cancer at Sheffield Children’s Hospital.

“It’s just every parent and grandparent’s nightmare,” she said to SWNS.

Ruby Leaning in the hospital

Ruby Leaning, pictured in the hospital, was diagnosed with acute leukemia in 2020. (Amanda Fawcett via SWNS)

“I was in the room with her mom when we found out, and you just can’t take anything in at all. It was all just heart-shattering.”

Fawcett described her granddaughters as “so close,” telling SWNS that they are “amazing girls.”

“They’ve got a great relationship between them,” she said.

Advertisement

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR OUR HEALTH NEWSLETTER

“But Mabel will be asking to borrow Ruby’s shoes when she realizes [she saved her life] – and we do laugh about how it will be fun and games.”

Fawcett said Ruby Leaning has been “doing fantastic” in remission and is “back to her normal self.”

Ruby Leaning and Mabel Leaning

Ruby and Mabel Leaning have “a great relationship between them,” grandmother Amanda Fawcett said. (Amanda Fawcett via SWNS)

“She’s a happy, normal and healthy 10-year-old who loves swimming, dancing and piano lessons,” she said.

The grandmother is currently raising money for the Parents Association of Children with Tumors and Leukemia (PACT), which supported the Leaning family, according to SWNS.

Advertisement

“None of us could be there for Ruby, which was horrendous for us, because of the pandemic,” Fawcett shared.

“But they were an amazing support.”

Fox News Digital reached out to Sheffield Children’s Hospital for additional comment.

For more Health articles, visit www.foxnews.com/health.

Advertisement
Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Health

Peter Graves and James Arness: These Iconic TV Stars Were Brothers

Published

on

Peter Graves and James Arness: These Iconic TV Stars Were Brothers



Advertisement


Peter Graves and James Arness: Iconic Actors and Brothers | Woman’s World

























Advertisement













Advertisement


Use left and right arrow keys to navigate between menu items.


Use escape to exit the menu.

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Health

Keto vs. Atkins Diet: Same Theory, Different Approach | Woman's World

Published

on

Keto vs. Atkins Diet: Same Theory, Different Approach | Woman's World



Advertisement


Keto vs. Atkins Diet: Same Theory, Different Approach | Woman’s World
























Advertisement













Advertisement


Use left and right arrow keys to navigate between menu items.


Use escape to exit the menu.

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Health

Lupus expert debunks 7 common myths about the autoimmune disease: ‘Not a death sentence’

Published

on

Lupus expert debunks 7 common myths about the autoimmune disease: ‘Not a death sentence’

Join Fox News for access to this content

You have reached your maximum number of articles. Log in or create an account FREE of charge to continue reading.

Please enter a valid email address.

By entering your email and pushing continue, you are agreeing to Fox News’ Terms of Use and Privacy Policy, which includes our Notice of Financial Incentive. To access the content, check your email and follow the instructions provided.

Having trouble? Click here.

Fatigue, pain, swelling, rashes and hair loss are just some of the symptoms that affect people with lupus, a chronic autoimmune disease in which the immune system attacks healthy tissue.

Some 1.5 million Americans are living with lupus, with about 16,000 new cases each year, according to the Lupus Foundation of America, based in Washington, D.C.

Advertisement

There are many myths surrounding lupus that can make it difficult for people to understand and manage the disease, according to Dr. Brooke Goldner, a board-certified medical doctor and an autoimmune professor at Cornell University.

EXPERIMENTAL LUPUS THERAPY COULD BE ‘LIFE-CHANGING’ FOR PATIENTS WITH AUTOIMMUNE DISEASE, STUDY FINDS

“It’s essential to educate yourself and others about lupus to dispel these myths and increase understanding of the disease,” Golder, who was diagnosed with lupus at the age of 16, told Fox News Digital.

For Lupus Awareness Month, Goldner shared some of the biggest misconceptions — and set the record straight on a number of issues.

Dr. Brooke Goldner, a board-certified medical doctor and an autoimmune professor at Cornell University, pictured at right, is committed to debunking lupus myths and misconceptions. (iStock/Dr. Brooke Goldner)

Advertisement

7 myths debunked

Myth No. 1: There is only one type of lupus

The most common type of lupus is systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), but it’s not the only form of the disease. 

“SLE can have a wide range of symptoms that may come and go, making it challenging to diagnose,” Goldner said. 

FRIENDS RUN FOR A CURE FOR LUPUS, COMPLETING NYC MARATHON IN HONOR OF LONGTIME PAL AND LUPUS SUFFERER

Some of the common symptoms of SLE include fatigue, joint pain and stiffness, fever, hair loss, skin rashes and sensitivity to sunlight.

Cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE), a less common form, affects only the skin. 

Advertisement

The two least common types are neonatal lupus and drug-induced lupus, according to the Lupus Foundation of America.

Myth No. 2: Lupus is contagious

Lupus cannot be transmitted from person to person, Goldner said. 

“It occurs when your immune system attacks your own tissues and organs, causing inflammation and damage,” she said. 

Woman holding her wrist

“Lupus can affect various parts of the body, including the skin, joints, kidneys, brain and other organs,” one doctor said. (BSIP/Universal Images Group via Getty Images)

“Lupus can affect various parts of the body, including the skin, joints, kidneys, brain and other organs.”

Myth No. 3: Lupus only affects women

“While lupus does affect more women than men, it can affect anyone, including children and men,” Goldner said. 

Advertisement

Anyone can develop lupus. Yet 90% of cases affect women between the ages of 15 and 44, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Myth No. 4: Lupus is a cancer

Medicines like chemotherapy are often used in severe lupus cases, but it is not a form of cancer

FOR AUTOIMMUNE DISEASE SUFFERERS, GINGER MAY ‘PLAY A CRITICAL ROLE’ IN CONTROLLING INFLAMMATION, STUDY FINDS

“It is an autoimmune disease, whereby the immune system begins attacking the body’s own tissues rather than just foreign invaders like viruses and bacteria,” Goldner told Fox News Digital.

“Chemotherapy is known as an immune system suppressant, which can be lifesaving when lupus is causing organ failure and aggressive immunosuppression is required.”

Advertisement

Myth No. 5: Lupus is caused by stress

While stress can trigger lupus symptoms, Goldner noted it is not the cause of the disease.

“The exact cause of lupus is unknown, but it is believed to be a combination of genetic, environmental and hormonal factors,” she said.

Myth No. 6: Lupus is purely caused by genetics

Genetics will determine whether you have the possibility of developing lupus, but it is not a condition you are born with, according to Goldner. 

Sick teen

Fatigue is a primary symptom of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). (iStock)

“Just like someone with the genetics to become type 2 diabetic will not develop the disease unless they have a diet and lifestyle that triggers it, the same is true for lupus,” she said.

Lupus is often triggered during times of physical and emotional stress combined with a nutrient-poor inflammatory diet, the expert added.

Advertisement

Myth No. 7: Lupus is a death sentence

While lupus can be a serious disease, it is “not a death sentence,” according to Goldner. 

“While there is no medical cure for lupus, there are treatments available that can help manage the symptoms and prevent damage to vital organs,” she said.

‘LIQUID GOLD’ COULD BRING NEW HOPE TO MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS PATIENTS, STUDY SUGGESTS: ‘PROFOUND BENEFIT’

“Treatment may include medications such as anti-inflammatory drugs, immunosuppressants and corticosteroids.” 

In addition to taking medications, many people with lupus can manage symptoms through healthy lifestyle interventions, according to Goldner.

Advertisement

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR OUR HEALTH NEWSLETTER

“Lifestyle changes such as regular exercise, healthy eating and stress management can help improve the quality of life for people with lupus,” the expert said.

Healthy eating

“Lifestyle changes such as regular exercise, healthy eating and stress management can help improve the quality of life for people with lupus,” the expert said. (iStock)

As a survivor of lupus and a physician, Goldner said she has dedicated her life to bringing more awareness to the disease and helping people gain the power to manage and eliminate symptoms through nutrition and lifestyle.

“This is not to suggest that people should not use medical treatments that can be lifesaving,” she said, “but rather that they embrace taking control of all the variables they can manage, like how they eat, sleep and manage stress with self-care, so they can minimize illness and maximize recovery and remission.”

Advertisement

For more Health articles, visit www.foxnews.com/health.

Continue Reading

Trending