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Second American contracts bird flu tied to dairy cows as CDC says risk of infection still low

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Second American contracts bird flu tied to dairy cows as CDC says risk of infection still low

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announced Wednesday that a second H5N1 bird flu case has been identified by officials.

A 55-year-old Michigan dairy worker became ill after working with H5N1-infected cattle, the CDC said in a press release. While an upper respiratory tract sample tested negative, a specimen from his eye confirmed the H5N1 bird flu infection.

A Texas farm worker was diagnosed with the disease in March. Both the Michigan and Texas patients suffered from conjunctivitis, or pink eye. Neither showed signs of a respiratory infection.

“Conjunctivitis (eye infection) has been associated with previous human infections with avian influenza A viruses and is part of the current CDC case definition for A(H5N1) surveillance,” the CDC explained in a Wednesday press release. 

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VIRAL ‘HOSTAGE TAPE’ SLEEPING TREND GAINS STEAM AS DOCTORS WARN OF POTENTIAL DANGERS

At least two farm workers have been infected with H5N1 bird flu this year. (iStock)

“While it’s not known exactly how eye infections result from avian influenza exposures, it may be from contamination of the eye(s), potentially with a splash of contaminated fluid, or touching the eye(s) with something contaminated with A(H5N1) virus, such as a hand.”

The Texas case marked the first human case of H5N1 bird flu in the United States. Globally, it was the first time a human caught H5 bird flu from a cow.

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) has found that at least 49 dairy herds across nine states have been exposed to H5N1.  On Wednesday, the CDC maintained that the health risk that H5N1 bird flu poses to humans is still low.

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THREE WOMEN — AGES 41, 55 AND 64 — SHARE THEIR SECRETS TO BETTER HEALTH AND LONGEVITY

Doctor testing milk samples

Fatinah Albeez, a research associate with the Broad Institute’s Sabeti lab, works with milk samples in May 2024. (David L. Ryan/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)

“Based on the information available, this infection does not change CDC’s current H5N1 bird flu human health risk assessment for the U.S. general public, which the agency considers to be low.,” the CDC said. “However, this development underscores the importance of recommended precautions in people with exposure to infected or potentially infected animals.”

Officials are still monitoring the outbreak, but maintain that pasteurized milk is safe to drink.

“I can say without reservation that our commercial milk and meat supplies are safe,” USDA official Eric Deeble said during a briefing on May 16. “At no time were animals that are sick from H5N1 or any other animal disease permitted to enter into our food supply.”

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Doctor standing with bird flu samples

Jon Arizti Sanz, PhD, Postdoctoral Fellow working in the lab to test bird flu samples in May 2024.

The CDC is encouraging Americans to avoid exposure to dead animals and animal waste. Officials also discourage drinking raw milk.

“Following these recommendations is central to reducing a person’s risk and containing the overall public health risk,” the organization advised.

Fox News Digital’s Melissa Rudy contributed to this report.

For more Health articles, visit www.foxnews.com/health.

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Kids with insufficient sleep could see spike in blood pressure, study finds

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Kids with insufficient sleep could see spike in blood pressure, study finds

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Poor sleep habits have a ripple effect on many aspects of kids’ health — and a new study has revealed that blood pressure is one of them.

A report published in the journal Pediatrics this week said that going to sleep earlier and sleeping for longer durations is linked to lower blood pressure in children.

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Researchers analyzed 539 patients averaging 14.6 years old, who slept for an average of 9.1 hours per night. 

MAJOR HEALTH ORGANIZATION MAKES STARTLING HEART DISEASE PREDICTION: ‘NEAR-PERFECT STORM’

Children who went to sleep later were found to have worse blood pressure parameters during the day — while those who slept for longer periods had reduced blood pressure.

The results were consistent regardless of age, gender, body mass index and the day of the week.

A report published in the journal Pediatrics this week revealed that going to sleep earlier and sleeping for longer durations is linked to lower blood pressure in children. (iStock)

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“The key takeaway is that essential hypertension in children is, like in adults, contributed by lifestyle,” Dr. Amy Kogon, the study’s lead author and assistant professor at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, told Fox News Digital.  

NEW BLOOD PRESSURE PROCEDURE IS ‘GAME-CHANGING’ FOR PEOPLE WITH UNCONTROLLED HYPERTENSION, SAY DOCTORS

“As physicians, we typically counsel patients to improve diet and physical activity to improve blood pressure, but this study suggests that sleep may be an additional facet to consider.”

 “This study suggests that sleep may be an additional [health] facet to consider.”

The researchers were surprised to find that longer sleep duration was associated with blunted “nocturnal dipping,” which is the expected drop in blood pressure that comes during sleep.  

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“It is considered abnormal if a patient does not exhibit nocturnal dipping on their ambulatory blood pressure study,” Kogon said.

Girl blood pressure

Children who went to sleep later were found to have worse blood pressure parameters during the day, while those who slept for longer periods had reduced blood pressure, a new study found. (iStock)

“We expected that shorter sleep would be associated with blunted nocturnal dipping, and ultimately found that instead, longer sleep duration was associated with blunted nocturnal dipping.”

This was primarily seen in patients who reported excessive sleep duration, the researcher noted.

“It’s possible that those with excessive sleep duration are not sleeping well,” she said.

KIDS’ SLEEP PROBLEMS COULD BE INHERITED, NEW RESEARCH SUGGESTS

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“For instance, if they had sleep apnea or even if they were in bed but on their phone or watching TV all night, that might explain the blunted nocturnal dipping.”  

The study did have some limitations, Kogon acknowledged.

Girl sleeping

Children between 6 and 12 years old should get 9-12 hours of sleep each night — while those between ages 13 and 18 need 8-10 hours, per the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. (iStock)

“It was a retrospective review of data — so these are associations,” she told Fox News Digital. 

“Also, we captured sleep duration by self-reporting for only [a] 24-hour period of data and assumed that it is representative of the patient’s sleep duration in general.”

The researchers also did not gather data on sleep quality or sleep disorders.

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Factors impacting children’s blood pressure

High blood pressure affects about one in every seven people between 12 and 19 years of age, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

As with adults, children with elevated blood pressure are at a higher risk of stroke and heart attack, experts say.

Sleep is just one of several risk factors that can impact this key health metric.

doctor checks patient's blood pressure

High blood pressure affects about one in every seven people between 12 and 19 years of age, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (iStock)

Other influencers include obesity, physical fitness, diet and environmental stress, according to the American Heart Association.

Children between 6 and 12 years old should get 9-12 hours of sleep each night, while those between 13 and 18 need 8-10 hours, per the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

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Studies have shown that most youth are falling short, with 6 out of 10 U.S. middle schoolers and 7 out of 10 high-school students saying they don’t get enough sleep on school nights.

How kids can improve their sleep

Michael Gradisar, head of sleep science at Sleep Cycle and a clinical psychologist based in Adelaide, Australia, said the biggest obstacle to kids’ sleep might not be what people think.

“The scientific evidence doesn’t show that screens are the main obstacle to young people getting a good night’s sleep,” he told Fox News Digital.

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“The obstacle is actually their body clock. Because their body clock is timed late, they tend to fall asleep late and wake up late. Scientists have known this for decades.”

To improve sleep quality, Gradisar recommended using morning bright light therapy tailored to the person’s own body clock timing.

Boy insomnia

Six out of 10 U.S. middle schoolers and 7 out of 10 high-school students say they don’t get enough sleep on school nights. (iStock)

Morning bright light therapy uses bright light to help reset the circadian rhythm and normalize sleep patterns.

“That has shown the best results, according to the clinical trials that have been performed — including those we’ve run here in Australia,” he said.

For more Health articles, visit www.foxnews/health 

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Looking ahead, the researchers plan to determine whether a sleep promotion intervention will improve blood pressure, Kogon said.

“We plan to explore this further by obtaining sleep quality data and obtaining more long-term sleep measures in patients being evaluated for high blood pressure,” she added.

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Men’s energy and vitality plummets for 6 reasons. Boost it back up this way

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Men’s energy and vitality plummets for 6 reasons. Boost it back up this way

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Surveys have shown that less than half of men consider their physical, mental and sexual health as excellent or very good — but they don’t have to settle for functioning at sub-par levels.

“While it’s true that aging brings changes in hormone levels and metabolism, it’s a misconception that nothing can be done about feelings of fatigue or a lack of energy and vitality,” Dr. Brynna Connor, M.D., a Texas physician specializing in anti-aging and regenerative medicine, and health care ambassador for NorthWestPharmacy.com, told Fox News Digital.

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“So much can be done in this area to ensure that we age gracefully.”

CANCER NEARLY TOOK HIS LEG, BUT THIS FATHER OF 6 IS WALKING AGAIN: ‘I SHOULDN’T BE HERE’

For Men’s Health Month, several doctors shared with Fox News Digital some common reasons for the decline. They also shared tips for getting back up to speed.

1. Hormonal imbalances or changes

“Testosterone levels naturally decline as men age, which can contribute to a lack of energy or feelings of fatigue,” said Connor.

For Men’s Health Month, several doctors shared with Fox News Digital some common reasons for the decline — and tips for getting back up to speed. (iStock)

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Older men who are experiencing signs or symptoms of low testosterone can get their levels checked by a doctor and explore treatment options.

ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION MEDS LIKE VIAGRA LINKED TO REDUCED ALZHEIMER’S RISK, STUDY SUGGESTS

In 2020, the American College of Physicians recommended that doctors “should prescribe testosterone for men with age-related low testosterone only to treat sexual dysfunction.”

Hormone therapy comes with both benefits and risks, so men should discuss the pros and cons with their doctor.

2. Lack of physical activity

A sedentary lifestyle can be directly related to feelings of lagging energy or decreased vitality, according to Connor.

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“When the body doesn’t get enough exercise, it doesn’t release endorphins, neurotransmitters that help improve mood and reduce stress,” she said. 

“It’s a misconception that nothing can be done about feelings of fatigue or a lack of energy and vitality.”

“When there’s a lack of activity, the cardiovascular and muscular systems start to become deconditioned, and the body also doesn’t get as much oxygen, which can lead to feelings of fatigue.”

Mark Edwards, a fitness trainer and nutrition coach at Minimalist Nutrition + Fitness based in Tokyo, Japan, follows a simple mantra with his clients: Move more and preserve muscle.

Lazy man

A sedentary lifestyle can be directly related to feelings of lagging energy or decreased vitality, doctors say. (iStock)

“The usual response from sedentary individuals is, ‘I’m too tired to exercise,’” he told Fox News Digital. “Well, the reason you’re tired is because you don’t move. Also, loss of muscle mass as we pass 40 is a huge factor in loss of vitality.” 

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“This becomes a vicious cycle.”

Edwards recommends taking it slow and gradually building up your movement routine.

AMERICANS NEED MORE SLEEP, LESS STRESS, EXPERTS SAY, AS GALLUP POLL REVEALS TROUBLING FINDINGS

“Make sure, as you begin moving more, to incorporate resistance training into your routine, preferably with a skilled trainer or coach,” he advised. 

“The more you exercise, the more energy you’ll have. Movement is the secret sauce to more vitality, more energy, and a longer, more independent life.”

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3. Insufficient sleep

“Quality sleep is essential for overall health, so it’s no surprise that a lack of sleep can contribute to feelings of fatigue or reduced vitality,” said Connor. 

“In addition to not getting enough recovery to meet the body’s physical needs — which can cause a dip in energy levels — poor sleep can also impact mental clarity, leading to difficulty in decision-making and feelings of brain fog.”

Man awake at night

“Quality sleep is essential for overall health, so it’s no surprise that a lack of sleep can contribute to feelings of fatigue or reduced vitality,” a doctor said. (iStock)

Low-quality sleep is also a big factor in overeating, Edwards noted.

“Research shows that the day following poor sleep, appetite increases significantly.” 

SOME PATIENTS WHO SEE FEMALE DOCTORS COULD LIVE LONGER, STUDY SUGGESTS: ‘HIGHER EMPATHY’

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To achieve better sleep, Edwards recommends shutting down your smartphone and other devices an hour before bed and having your last meal before 7 p.m.

“What’s the effect? Better weight and appetite management, more energy and a better life.”

For most healthy adults, at least seven hours of sleep is recommended each night.

4. Poor diet and nutrition

There’s a reason for the adage “you are what you eat,” Connor said.

“The body is fueled by what goes into it, and if it’s not getting the vitamins, nutrients or enough protein to produce adequate energy, it can lead to feelings of fatigue and a lack of energy and vitality.”

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man picks fruits and veggies out of the fridge

Experts recommend a clean diet that is high in nutrients, low in refined sugar, high in fiber — and with moderate protein levels. (iStock)

Dr. Sulagna Misra, M.D., BCMAS, founder of Misra Wellness in Los Angeles, recommends a clean diet that is high in nutrients, low in refined sugar, high in fiber, and with moderate protein levels.

“Preparing clean, healthy foods at home can assist in improving health and boosting energy and vitality,” she told Fox News Digital.

ASK A DOCTOR: ‘WHY DO I KEEP EATING FOODS THAT I KNOW ARE BAD FOR ME?’

Misra is also a proponent of prebiotics and probiotics. 

“Studies have shown that Lactobacillus rhamnosus (a gut-friendly bacteria) can help decrease inflammation, improve dental health, boost mood and improve overall gut health,” she said.

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Every man is different, but some may benefit from taking peptide supplements, which are proteins made up of amino acid molecules, Misra said.

“Movement is the secret sauce to more vitality, more energy, and a longer, more independent life.”

“More studies are unfolding related to their role in inflammation, sleep, cognition and gut health.”

Anyone considering supplements should see a doctor for a personalized assessment, she added.

5. Unmanaged stress

Stress can be triggered by mental, physical and emotional factors, Connor said, and it can also contribute to poor sleep, lack of physical activity and/or poor diet, creating a vicious cycle. 

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“When the body experiences stress, it releases cortisol and adrenaline, and over time, the constant excess release of these hormones can be mentally and physically exhausting,” she said. 

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Studies have also shown that stress can drain the body of micronutrients like B vitamins and magnesium, making it more difficult to metabolize protein for energy and to fall asleep, she added.

Incorporating more exercise and better sleep into your routine will help to offset unhealthy stress levels, experts agree, along with engaging in stress management techniques such as meditation, yoga or therapy.

6. Neglected health care

Many men make the mistake of not seeing a doctor until something is “wrong,” according to Dr. Rich Joseph, national director of performance medicine at Restore Hyper Wellness in Austin, Texas. 

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“Men should make preventative care a habit, and that includes regular visits to a medical professional to have an annual physical and blood work performed,” he told Fox News Digital.

“We can go decades without a serious issue, but that proactive, preventative care makes it easier to detect when an issue does pop up, because we’ve created that year-over-year baseline.”

Obese man with doctor

Many men make the mistake of not seeing a doctor until something is “wrong,” a doctor told Fox News Digital. (iStock)

This is particularly true for men entering their late 30s and early 40s, Joseph said, which is when health problems often begin to creep up. 

Men should especially seek medical attention if they notice a loss of interest in activities they previously enjoyed or experience significant weight change without effort, as these could be symptoms of a more serious health issue, Connor warned. 

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“A medical expert can help identify the cause of the lack of energy and create an individualized course of treatment for their patients’ needs.”

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Veterans with PTSD get 'significant' benefits from service dogs, first NIH-funded study finds

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Veterans with PTSD get 'significant' benefits from service dogs, first NIH-funded study finds

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This story discusses suicide. If you or someone you know is having thoughts of suicide, please contact the Suicide & Crisis Lifeline at 988 or 1-800-273-TALK (8255).

The positive impact of service dogs on the mental health of U.S. military veterans has been widely recognized.

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Now, the first clinical trial funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) looked into exactly how pairing service dogs with PTSD-diagnosed veterans improves symptoms.

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As June marks PTSD Awareness Month, the University of Arizona College of Veterinary Medicine partnered with K9s For Warriors – the nation’s largest provider of trained service dogs, based in Florida – to study over 156 military veterans over three months, based on their self-reported symptoms and doctors’ assessments. 

The largest nationwide survey of its kind analyzed service dog partnerships in 81 vets compared to those who received traditional care without a dog.

Marine Corps veteran Bill Lins, a sergeant from 2004 to 2016, is pictured here with his dog, Link. Lins suffered from PTSD and a traumatic brain injury after he left the service. (K9s for Warriors)

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The study looked at each participant’s PTSD symptoms, including psychosocial functioning, quality of life and social health.

Veterans with service dogs were found to have a 66% lower chance of a PTSD diagnosis compared to a control group without dogs.

These respondents also experienced lower levels of anxiety and depression, as well as improvements in most areas of emotional and social well-being, the study found.

K9s for Warriors chief program officer Kevin Steele noted in a press release that service dogs are “life-saving and life-transforming” for veterans.

Bill Lins with Link

“Asking for help is a sign of strength,” Marine veteran Bill Lins, pictured with his dog, Link, told Fox News Digital. (K9s for Warriors)

“These dogs have enabled our warriors to better connect with family, friends and their community and to begin living the life they previously didn’t think was possible,” he said. “The results of this study further prove that what we do here at K9s works.”

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Lead study author Dr. Maggie O’Haire of the University of Arizona College of Veterinary Medicine told Fox News Digital, “I think that service dogs have become increasingly popular for veterans, specifically for PTSD, and I think that for a while, we could support this based on anecdotes or emotional intuition.”

VET WHO LOST MILITARY ‘BROTHERS’ TO POST-WAR SUICIDE CALLS FOR URGENT CHANGE: ‘WE COULD DO BETTER’

She added, “But now that this practice is growing, we see the need for evidence on a scientific basis.”

O’Haire suggested that some clinicians feel “ill-equipped” to support this mode of therapy, which is why the evidence is so important.

a dog sitting in front of his veteran

The first clinical trial funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) looked into how pairing service dogs with PTSD-diagnosed veterans improves symptoms for those suffering from it. (iStock)

“We can increase effectiveness, reduce side effects, and make it better for both the person and the animal,” she said. 

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“And we do that through systematic collection of data on how it’s working.”

ON PTSD AWARENESS DAY, IMPORTANT HELP FOR VETERANS, MILITARY SERVICE MEMBERS IN SEARCH OF BETTER SLEEP

The co-author mentioned that each veteran involved in the study had an “incredible story” of survival.

“It’s not uncommon for me to hear from a veteran, ‘I would not be alive if it were not for my service dog,’” she said. 

“It’s not uncommon for me to hear from a veteran, ‘I would not be alive if it were not for my service dog.’”

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“We know that veterans are struggling. They’re facing high rates of anxiety, depression and even suicide. And what we see is that, in addition to evidence-based care, they’re also seeking out service dogs.”

An estimated 23% of military members and veterans with post-9/11 service have PTSD, according to NIH research. Veterans are also more likely to die by suicide than non-veterans.

A veteran’s success story

Marine Corps veteran Bill Lins, a sergeant from 2004 to 2016, battled with mental health issues, suffering from PTSD and a traumatic brain injury after leaving the service.

A MARATHON IN EVERY STATE: NAVY VET AND FORMER NYPD COP RUNS ACROSS US TO HELP DESERVING NONPROFIT

Lins, who is now a mental health therapist, sat on the advisory panel for the NIH service dog study. He told Fox News Digital he was once in the same dark place as many other veterans.

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“I was a very absent parent,” he said. “I could force myself through the motions, but I was very detached.”

Bill Lins with Link

Bill Lins is pictured with Link in front of the U.S. Capitol building in Washington, D.C. Today a mental health therapist, Lins sat on the advisory panel for the NIH service dog study.  (K9s for Warriors)

“I knew I loved my kids, but I couldn’t feel it – and that felt really wrong,” he went on. 

“It felt really shameful. And that’s [what] highlighted that maybe something bigger was going on.”

Lins considered that having “no identity” after leaving the Marine Corps fed into some other bad habits, like drinking and taking unnecessary risks.

“I was dumped back out into the world to get a job and be a dad,” he said. “It was tough.” 

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GEORGIA POLICE SERGEANT TOUTS ‘AMAZING’ ABILITIES OF K9 COMPANION IN BOOK: MADE HIM A ‘BETTER HUMAN’

Lins’ wife ultimately filed for divorce. “I was kind of just floating and had no idea where to go,” he said.

When he saw another veteran friend with a service dog who had a “lightness” to him, Lins decided to apply for a companion of his own.

“I don’t know how they picked such a remarkably perfect animal to pair with me.”

The veteran eventually heard from K9s for Warriors, who placed him with his service dog, Link, in Aug. 2022.

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“I don’t know how they picked such a remarkably perfect animal to pair with me,” he said. 

“I took him to the pool, and I remember laughing, watching him run. And I thought, ‘I can’t remember the last time I really laughed.’”

Lins described Link, a 72-pound lab mix, as a “wonderfully mannered, remarkable animal.”

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“He wants nothing more than to make everyone around him happy,” Lins said. “That is his life’s mission.”

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“He has done a 180 in my world, and my kids are all so thankful that he’s here,” he added. “My entire family loves him. He just hands out happiness and expects nothing in return.”

Bill Lins with Link

“He has done a 180 in my world,” said Bill Lins, pictured with his dog, Link. “My entire family loves him. He just hands out happiness and expects nothing in return.” (K9s for Warriors)

Having a service dog is a distraction from “the things that you worry about,” Lins said.

“The bond is so strong that I worry about him so much more than myself,” he said. “I get to stay present as opposed to [getting] lost in my own thoughts.”

For other veterans seeking help, Lins recommended having a service dog as a source of comfort when things get difficult.

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“He’s always there. He’s never judgmental,” he said. “I can have any emotion that I want. I can have nightmares and be upset. And there’s no shame around him. I don’t have to hide things.”

He added, “He intuitively wants to be there and take care of me the same way that I want to be there and take care of him.”

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