Connect with us

Health

Horoscopes: What's in Store for Your Zodiac February 12 — February 18, 2024? | Woman's World

Published

on

Horoscopes: What's in Store for Your Zodiac February 12 — February 18, 2024? | Woman's World



Advertisement


Horoscopes: What’s in Store for Your Zodiac February 12 — February 18, 2024? | Woman’s World
























Advertisement













Advertisement


Use left and right arrow keys to navigate between menu items.


Use escape to exit the menu.

Advertisement
Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Health

MDs: Here's How to Outsmart Sneaky Weight-Loss Side Effects So You Feel Better Than Ever

Published

on

MDs: Here's How to Outsmart Sneaky Weight-Loss Side Effects So You Feel Better Than Ever



Advertisement


Weight Loss Side Effects: How to Avoid Them | Woman’s World
























Advertisement













Advertisement


Use left and right arrow keys to navigate between menu items.


Use escape to exit the menu.

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Health

To combat nursing shortage, universities create accelerated 12-month training programs: 'A win-win'

Published

on

To combat nursing shortage, universities create accelerated 12-month training programs: 'A win-win'

America needs nurses — and some schools are implementing accelerated programs to train them. 

To shorten the process, these programs cut training time from up to four years down to one.

“I really do think this is a win-win for students and local hospitals and facilities,” said Elizabeth Mann, assistant clinical professor at the University of New England, in an interview with Fox News. She’s based in Maine. 

LESS THAN HALF OF NURSES ARE ‘FULLY ENGAGED’ AT WORK, WHILE MANY ARE ‘UNENGAGED,’ NEW REPORT REVEALS

Prospective students must have a previous bachelor’s degree and need to complete eight prerequisite courses. 

Advertisement

This is dramatically shorter than the typical two- to four-year nursing program. 

A student participates in training to become a nurse at the University of New England. (Kailey Schuyler)

“I think the ability to get a second degree in something like a bachelor’s in nursing is very appealing to many people,” UNE Nursing School’s interim director Donna Hyde told Fox News.

“They don’t have to have a health care background. We will get them there.”

NURSING SHORTAGE HITTING RURAL AMERICA HARDEST

Advertisement

The new fast-track nursing program at the University of New England is slated to begin in May. 

The goal is to help students get into the workforce sooner, but they’ll have to put in some serious training as well, experts say.

States with greatest nursing needs

The states most in need of nurses are Washington, Oregon, California, Michigan and Georgia, according to the National Center of Health Workforce Analysis.  (Kailey Schuyler)

“There’s nothing cut back. They do the same amount of clinical hours, so we allow time for that,” said Hyde. 

“Their schedule may have to be a little more flexible to include consideration of weekends.”

There’s a projected shortage of over 78,000 registered nurses next year, according to the National Center of Health Workforce Analysis. 

Advertisement

NURSING PROGRAMS STRUGGLE TO KEEP UP AMID A NATIONWIDE SHORTAGE OF NURSES

The states most in need of nurses are Washington, Oregon, California, Michigan and Georgia.

“As different states are looking at their own options to increase their nursing workforce, this is one of those options,” Jennifer Mensik Kennedy, the Oregon-based president of the American Nurses Association, told Fox News. 

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR OUR HEALTH NEWSLETTER

The shortened 12-month program not only appeals to students, but will also benefit local health care facilities, Mann said.

Advertisement

Hyde noted that she speaks to many of the nurse administrators at local health care partners, and “they obviously see the need for more nurses sooner rather than later.”

Nursing students training in simulation lab

Nursing students train in a simulation lab to prepare for the workforce. The shortened 12-month program appeals to students and also benefits local health care facilities, experts say. (Kailey Schuyler)

Some have expressed doubt that students can be ready in just a year, Mann pointed out.

​​”They may interpret it as [offering] a lesser quality [of training] or that we are pushing students through, and I do want to emphasize that is truly not the case,” she said.

Up to 40 students are expected to start the program in May at the University of New England.

Advertisement
Woman with doctor

To combat the nursing shortage, some schools are implementing accelerated programs to train new nurses.  (iStock)

Once students complete the program, they will have to pass a national exam — just like a traditional four-year student — to officially become a nurse. 

For more Health articles, visit www.foxnews.com/health

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Health

Was Wendy Williams’ dementia caused by alcoholism? Experts share insights

Published

on

Was Wendy Williams’ dementia caused by alcoholism? Experts share insights

Join Fox News for access to this content

Plus get unlimited access to thousands of articles, videos and more with your free account!

Please enter a valid email address.

By entering your email, you are agreeing to Fox News Terms of Service and Privacy Policy, which includes our Notice of Financial Incentive. To access the content, check your email and follow the instructions provided.

Former TV talk show host Wendy Williams, 59, was diagnosed with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and aphasia, which impairs the ability to communicate, in 2023, a representative confirmed on Thursday.

Given Williams’ reported history of alcoholism, experts are speaking out about the potential link between her alcohol abuse and current cognitive issues.

Advertisement

Thursday’s announcement of Williams’ diagnosis came ahead of a new Lifetime documentary — titled “Where Is Wendy Williams?” — that will premiere on Saturday, as her representative aims to “correct inaccurate and hurtful rumors about her health.”

WENDY WILLIAMS CONTROVERSY: INSIDE DEMENTIA, EXPLOSIVE DOCUMENTARY, FAMILY WAR TO VISIT TALK SHOW QUEEN

Williams entered a facility in April 2023 to allegedly treat “cognitive issues” reportedly due to alcohol abuse, as her family communicates with her through a court-appointed legal guardian.

“In 2023, after undergoing a battery of medical tests, Wendy was officially diagnosed with primary progressive aphasia and frontotemporal dementia (FTD),” Williams’ care team stated in a press release.

Wendy Williams attends a private dinner at Fresco By Scotto on Feb. 21, 2023, in New York City. The former TV talk show host has been diagnosed with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and aphasia. (Getty Images)

Advertisement

“Aphasia, a condition affecting language and communication abilities, and frontotemporal dementia, a progressive disorder impacting behavior and cognitive functions, have already presented significant hurdles in Wendy’s life.”

Fox News Digital reached out to Williams’ team requesting additional comment. 

Link between alcohol and brain health

Dr. Suzette Glasner, PhD, a psychologist in Los Angeles, California, has not treated or examined Williams but said heavy drinking and alcoholism can cause damage to both white and gray matter in the brain, and over time can lead to deteriorating cognitive functioning, including dementia.

“These neurocognitive impacts are a result of a combination of alcohol’s direct neurotoxic effects, depletion of nutrients in the body, impacts on liver functioning and disruption of communication between nerve cells in the brain,” Glasner told Fox News Digital.

WHAT IS FRONTOTEMPORAL DEMENTIA, THE DIAGNOSIS BRUCE WILLIS HAS RECEIVED?

Advertisement

When heavy and chronic alcohol use leads to brain damage, an individual can experience problems with their attention, memory and reasoning, the expert said.

“In many cases, individuals who misuse or are addicted to alcohol and drugs struggle with overlapping chronic medical and psychiatric conditions, and this can make it very challenging to determine the etiology or cause of neurocognitive symptoms such as those observed in Wendy Williams,” Glasner said.

wendy williams against a dark background

Thursday’s announcement of Williams’ diagnosis came ahead of a new Lifetime documentary — titled “Where Is Wendy Williams?” — that will premiere on Saturday, as her representative aims to “correct inaccurate and hurtful rumors about her health.” (lya S. Savenok/Getty Images for Wilhelmina Models)

Neuropsychiatric symptoms including cognitive impairment are common in Grave’s Disease, an autoimmune disorder Williams has spoken about battling over the years.

“Those symptoms often improve with treatment; however, like other chronic diseases, alcohol or drug use can complicate or interfere with treatment response, making improvements less likely,” noted Glasner. 

NEW ALZHEIMER’S TREATMENT ACCELERATES REMOVAL OF PLAQUE FROM THE BRAIN IN CLINICAL TRIALS

Advertisement

Elizabeth Landsverk, M.D., a geriatric and dementia expert in San Francisco, also has not treated Williams but said that substance misuse has been previously linked to cognitive decline. She also noted that the extent of its impact isn’t clear.

“Not enough research has been conducted on the matter to give us precise data,” she told Fox News Digital.  

“What has been noted is that alcohol abuse — as well as taking a number of other medications — does increase the risk of developing dementia.” 

What amount of alcohol is dangerous?

Brain damage and neurocognitive impacts can occur with heavy drinking in individuals with moderate or severe alcohol use disorders, Grasner said — “so there is a wide variation between individuals in the quantity of alcohol that leads to these neurotoxic effects.”

“The specific reasons that some individuals develop alcohol-related dementia whereas others do not are not well understood, so we don’t currently have guidelines specifying that if you drink a certain amount, you are likely to experience cognitive impairments,” she added. 

Advertisement
Woman drinking beer

Brain damage and neurocognitive impacts can occur with heavy drinking in individuals with moderate or severe alcohol use disorders, an expert said. (iStock)

Women are generally more vulnerable to the damaging effects of alcohol on the brain and body, Glasner noted, which means the onset can occur at a younger age than it would in men.

“Expert evaluation of the contribution of substance use and other underlying medical conditions such as Grave’s Disease to cognitive symptoms would be very important for Williams to ensure that she receives the right treatments at the right time,” Glasner recommended.

STUDY FINDS THAT PROTEINS MAY PREDICT WHO WILL GET DEMENTIA IN 10 YEARS BASED ON BLOOD SAMPLES

“Often involving a family very closely to evaluate the symptoms and the timing of their emergence relative to alcohol or other substance use can be helpful as part of determining an accurate diagnosis and plan of care,” she added.

Abstinence from alcohol is a crucial part of treatment for alcohol-related neurological deficits, noted Glasner.

Advertisement

“In many cases, individuals who misuse or are addicted to alcohol and drugs struggle with overlapping chronic medical and psychiatric conditions.”

If the condition is caught in time, abstaining from alcohol can at least partially, if not fully, reverse the symptoms, according to the expert.

Living with FTD and aphasia

While symptoms of FTD can vary depending on what part of the brain is affected, most people with the condition experience some common symptoms, as listed on the Johns Hopkins Medicine website. 

Behavior or personality changes are often the most obvious indicators. These may include public outbursts or socially inappropriate actions.

DEMENTIA AMONG YOUNGER PEOPLE IS LINKED TO 15 FACTORS, MAJOR STUDY REVEALS

Advertisement

People with FTD also tend to have impaired judgment, a lack of empathy and lower self-awareness, Johns Hopkins states. 

This type of dementia is also marked by a reduced ability to understand or formulate language.

virtual volumetric drawing of brain in hand

Heavy drinking and alcoholism can cause damage to both white and gray matter in the brain, and over time can lead to deteriorating cognitive functioning, a psychiatrist said. (iStock)

People may struggle to remember the names of objects, string words into sentences or even recall the meanings of words they used to know. 

The condition can also lead to agitation, irritability and drastic mood swings.

Advertisement

There is no treatment for FTD other than managing symptoms and educating family members and caregivers, according to Hackensack Meridian Neuroscience Institute in New Jersey.

Some aphasia symptoms can be managed with speech therapy.

“The specific reasons why some individuals develop alcohol-related dementia whereas others do not are not well understood.”

“Treatment focuses a great deal on family education,” said Reena Gottesman, M.D., a behavioral neurologist at the Center for Brain Loss and Memory Health at Hackensack Meridian Neuroscience Institute, in a press release.

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR OUR HEALTH NEWSLETTER

Advertisement

Approximately 50,000-60,000 people may have FTD, per data from the Alzheimer’s Association, a nonprofit group based in Chicago.

Recently, actor Bruce Willis’ FTD diagnosis brought new attention to the rare condition.

For more Health articles, visit www.foxnews.com/health.

Continue Reading

Trending