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8 of the biggest health stories from this week in case you missed them

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8 of the biggest health stories from this week in case you missed them

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Fox News Digital publishes a range of health pieces every day of the week to keep you up-to-date on the most important wellness news.

Cutting-edge medical research, breakthrough medications, mental health challenges, personal medical dramas and more are all covered.

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In case you missed them, here are a few of the biggest health stories from this week.

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As always, you can see a full list of recent health pieces at http://www.foxnews/health

Check out these eight key stories. 

1. Certain supplements could increase heart attack, stroke risk

A new study suggests that taking a popular form of supplements could make a certain group of people more susceptible to experiencing heart disease and strokes. 

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A cardiologist and nutritionist weighed in. Click here to get the story.

“Further studies are needed to determine the precise mechanisms for the development and prognosis of cardiovascular disease events with regular use of fish oil supplements,” the authors of a new study wrote. (iStock)

2. Half of Americans are ill-equipped to help in a crisis

Only 51% of polled Americans know how to perform hands-only CPR, and only 49% could assist with serious bleeding. 

ER doctors shared tips on how people can be better prepared. Click here to get the story.

Emergency room

“When you’re trained in these lifesaving skills, you’ll know how to recognize the signs that someone needs help and buy time until the [first] responders can get there,” a doctor said. (iStock)

3. Many patients taken off life support may have survived, study suggests

Families may want to wait before making the “irreversible decision” to take loved ones off life support after a traumatic brain injury, some doctors and researchers say. Click here to get the story.

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hospital setting patient holds hand

Many patients who died after traumatic brain injuries may have survived and recovered if their families had waited to take them off life support, a new study has found. (iStock)

4. Three women share their best longevity tips

For Women’s Health Month, three mothers and grandmothers — ages 41, 55 and 64 — revealed how they’re defying their chronological ages. Click here to get the story.

Women's health

Left to right, Julie Gibson Clark, Amy Hardison and Lil Eskey all shared the lifestyle habits that are helping them slow down biological aging. (James Lee, Amy Hardison, Lil Eskey)

5. Lupus expert debunks 7 common myths

Dr. Brooke Goldner of Cornell University, who lives with lupus, has dedicated her life to raising awareness of the disease. She shared the truths behind some of the biggest misconceptions. Click here to get the story.

Lupus split

Dr. Brooke Goldner, a board-certified medical doctor and an autoimmune professor at Cornell University, pictured at right, is committed to debunking lupus myths and misconceptions. (iStock/Dr. Brooke Goldner)

6. Heart attack risk could spike during election season

Research from Massachusetts General Hospital found that people who have specific genetic traits, paired with anxiety or depression, are at a “significantly higher heart attack risk” during periods of social or political stress. Click here to get the story.

2020 election results next to image of a heart attack

“The mind-heart connection is strong, and this study highlights that not only our bodies, but also our minds, need rest and care,” a doctor said. (Lorenzo Bevilaqua/ABC via Getty Images; iStock)

7. Disrupted sleep, plus nightmares, could be linked to autoimmune diseases

Those who experience vivid nightmares and odd hallucinations might be at a higher risk of lupus, a new study suggests. Researchers and doctors revealed the link. Click here to get the story.

Desperate girl suffering insomnia

The study looked at not only the issues surrounding sleep, but also when the issues for participants began. (iStock)

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8. Paralyzed patients could find new hope in spinal cord stimulation

Ninety percent of paralyzed patients regained strength or function in their upper limbs after receiving an experimental therapy, a new study found. Experts weighed in on why this could be a “game-changer” for some patients. Click here to get the story.

Weekend health stories

Some of this week’s top health stories include supplement risks, emergency skills, sleep disorder ramifications and more. (iStock)

For more Health articles, visit www.foxnews.com/health.

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Experimental Alzheimer’s drug gets FDA advisory panel's thumbs-up: ‘Progress is happening’

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Experimental Alzheimer’s drug gets FDA advisory panel's thumbs-up: ‘Progress is happening’

An experimental Alzheimer’s drug, donanemab, was endorsed by a U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advisory panel on Monday.

Donanemab is designed to treat symptoms of early Alzheimer’s disease, including mild cognitive impairment and mild Alzheimer’s dementia.

At the FDA’s Peripheral and Central Nervous System Advisory Committee hearing, which was held in Maryland on Monday, the advisers unanimously agreed that the drug’s benefits outweigh any potential risks.

CAN WE REVERSE ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE? EXPERTS SUGGEST ‘NEW PARADIGM’ FOR COMBATING DEMENTIA

While this isn’t a guarantee the FDA will approve the drug, the agency does typically follow the panel’s recommendations, per reports.

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“The FDA held the advisory committee meeting to hear the viewpoints and assessments of the experts on both the benefits and the risks of donanemab,” the agency told Fox News Digital in an emailed statement. 

“As with all applications the FDA receives, we will thoroughly review and consider the input from the committee.”

An experimental Alzheimer’s drug, donanemab, was endorsed by a U.S. Food and Drug Administration advisory panel on Monday. (iStock)

Officials at Eli Lilly, the Indiana pharmaceutical company that makes donanemab, were also in attendance, fielding questions from the committee about potential side effects.

At the Monday hearing, Eli Lilly officials presented clinical trial results that showed the drug slowed cognitive and functional decline for people with mild cognitive impairment due to early stages of Alzheimer’s.

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The study was also published by the Journal of the American Medical Association.

ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE FOUND TO BE TRANSMITTED THROUGH MEDICAL PROCEDURES DECADES AGO, STUDY FINDS

In phase 3 trials published in May 2023, donanemab was shown to “significantly slow cognitive and functional decline in people with early symptomatic Alzheimer’s disease,” according to a press release on Eli Lilly’s website.

If donanemab is approved, it would become only the second available medication designed to slow the progression of Alzheimer’s symptoms.

Man taking medicine

Donanemab is designed to treat symptoms of early Alzheimer’s disease, including mild cognitive impairment and mild Alzheimer’s dementia. (iStock)

Leqembi, the first new Alzheimer’s treatment in 20 years, was given full FDA approval in July 2023.

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Donanemab works by clearing built-up amyloid from the brain. It was shown to cause side effects such as “brain swelling and tiny bleeds,” researchers found.

FDA FULLY APPROVES ‘NOVEL’ ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE DRUG LEQEMBI, WILL BE COVERED BY MEDICARE

The Alzheimer’s Association, based in Chicago, released a statement welcoming the FDA’s finding that donanemab is effective for the treatment of early Alzheimer’s disease.

“A future with more approved Alzheimer’s treatments is a tremendous advancement for people eligible for these drugs,” said Joanne Pike, DrPH, Alzheimer’s Association president and CEO, in a statement provided to Fox News Digital. 

Eli Lilly

Eli Lilly officials presented clinical trial results showing that the drug, donanemab, slowed cognitive and functional decline for people with mild cognitive impairment due to early stages of Alzheimer’s. (iStock)

“Progress with treatment is happening. Now we need more types of treatments, targeting a variety of aspects of the disease, with greater efficacy and safety,” she continued.

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“A rich and robust life without the threat of memory loss, confusion or cognitive decline — this is what we envision.”

The next step toward approval of donanemab is FDA review.

Dr. Marc Siegel

Dr. Marc Siegel, clinical professor of medicine at NYU Langone Medical Center, noted that donanemab is very similar to Leqembi, the current drug on the market that blocks amyloid formation.  (Dr. Marc Siegel)

Dr. Marc Siegel, clinical professor of medicine at NYU Langone Medical Center and a Fox News medical contributor, who was not involved in the drug trials, noted that donanemab is very similar to Leqembi, the current drug on the market that blocks amyloid formation. 

“A rich and robust life without the threat of memory loss, confusion or cognitive decline — this is what we envision.”

— Joanne Pike, CEO of the Alzheimer’s Association

“The problem with … denonemab is similar — it can cause brain swelling and bleeding,” Siegel told Fox News Digital.

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“It is also expensive, as it’s once a month versus once every two weeks for Leqembi.” 

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Denonemab is “somewhat more effective,” Siegel noted, as it slows progression of Alzheimer’s by about 35% versus 27% for Leqembi.

“It may be better at removing plaques,” he said.

man with alzheimers supported by wife

“A future with more approved Alzheimer’s treatments is a tremendous advancement for people eligible for these drugs,” the Alzheimer’s Association president and CEO said in a statement. (iStock)

There may be limitations associated with these types of drugs, however, according to the doctor.

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“Many experts have told me that the obsession with amyloid formation may not be the holy grail it was once thought to be,” Siegel told Fox News Digital. 

“The study didn’t pay enough attention to tau proteins, which are also a key player here.” 

For more Health articles, visit www.foxnews/health

Tau proteins, which cause “tangles” in the brain of Alzheimer’s patients, are not the primary targets of these drugs, Siegel said. 

                             

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“There is also the issue of neuroinflammation and neuronal transmission abnormalities, which precede the buildup of the plaque proteins and are important targets for research.”              

In response, Eli Lilly provided the below statement.

“Lilly is pursuing multiple approaches to treat Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia. Our pipeline of molecules in human testing includes ones aimed at amyloid (donanemab, remternetug), tau (OGA inhibitor), as well as lewy body dementia and frontotemporal dementia.”

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I Lost 233 Pounds With Protein Shakes to Jumpstart Weight Loss!

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I Lost 233 Pounds With Protein Shakes to Jumpstart Weight Loss!



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Does sunscreen cause skin cancer? Doctors debunk claims gone wild on social media

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Does sunscreen cause skin cancer? Doctors debunk claims gone wild on social media

Some claims on social media about sun safety have grown into a major misconception that sunscreen could cause skin cancer.

Hundreds of creators, many on TikTok, have posted videos arguing that the sun isn’t the culprit in causing cancer, but rather that harmful chemicals found in sunscreens are to blame.

This stems from a 2021 recall of Neutrogena spray sunscreens and one Aveeno product (Aveeno Protect + Refresh aerosol sunscreen) due to the presence of benzene, a known carcinogen.

JOHNSON & JOHNSON RECALLS SEVERAL SUNSCREENS: HOW TO CHOOSE THE RIGHT PRODUCT

Johnson & Johnson officials confirmed that benzene is not a sunscreen ingredient, according to a Harvard Medical School advisory in Oct. 2021.

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Additional testing reportedly found such low levels of benzene in these products that it would not be expected to cause health problems.

Johnson & Johnson’s Neutrogena Beach Defense bottles are seen on display on a table. The Neutrogena Beach Defense is one of the sunscreens that was recalled due to containing benzene. (Aimee Dilger/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)

Experts advised choosing a different sunscreen brand as a solution.

But a national survey by the Orlando Health Cancer Institute in Florida found that one in seven adults under 35 years old believe sunscreen is more harmful to the skin than direct sun exposure.

SKIN CANCER CHECKS AND SUNSCREEN: WHY THESE (STILL) MATTER VERY MUCH FOR GOOD HEALTH

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Another 23% believe that drinking water and staying hydrated can prevent sunburns.

“This phenomenon taps into the public’s growing distrust of companies due to the proliferation of harmful chemicals in consumer products.”

Many Americans (32%) also believe that a tan makes people look better and healthier, the survey found.

Rajesh Nair, M.D., an oncology surgeon at the Orlando Health Cancer Institute, commented in a press release that there is “no such thing as a healthy tan.”

woman using sunscreen on a beach

Thirty-two percent of Americans believe that a tan makes people look better and healthier, according to the Orlando Health Cancer Institute study. (iStock)

“It’s really just a visual manifestation of damage to the skin,” he said. “But we’re fighting against a perceived positive image and health benefits of something that actually has a totally opposite reality, which is that suntanned skin represents an increased risk of a deadly disease.”

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“Age, gender and phenotype play a role, too.” 

Krista Rubin, a nurse practitioner and member of Mass General Cancer Center’s Melanoma Team, told Fox News Digital that there is “little evidence supporting the claim that sunscreens are carcinogenic.” 

SUNBURN SOS: 7 TIPS TO SOOTHE YOUR SUN-DAMAGED SKIN, ACCORDING TO A WELLNESS EXPERT

“There is clear-cut evidence of the link between UV radiation exposure and skin cancer,” she wrote in an email. “However, the risk of developing skin cancer isn’t limited to UV radiation exposure – age, gender and phenotype play a role, too.” 

Males are at a higher risk of developing skin cancer, Rubin said, as are people with blonde or red hair, light skin or light eyes. 

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man applies sunscreen on his shoulder at the beach

Sunburns are caused by damage from the sun’s UV rays, according to experts. (iStock)

Other risk factors include having a suppressed immune system, being a solid organ transplant recipient or taking certain medications.

Rubin reiterated that sunburns are caused by the sun’s UV rays damaging the skin. So, while drinking water in hot weather will help prevent dehydration and keep the body cool, it will not prevent sunburn.

HOW TO WEAR SUNSCREEN THE RIGHT WAY: YOUR GUIDE TO SPF

“A tan is visible evidence of skin injury,” the expert said. “Whether from the sun or from a tanning bed, tanning exposes the skin to high levels of UVA radiation, which we know is not healthy and is linked to both skin cancer and accelerated aging.”

Social media expert Eric Dahan, founder of Mighty Joy, said she believes social media has become “rife with misinformation about sunscreen.”

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Peeling skin on the shoulder after sunburn

“A tan is visible evidence of skin injury,” one expert said. (iStock)

“It’s often spread by well-meaning but overall uninformed, self-appointed health and wellness experts and select dermatologists,” said Dahan, who is based in California. 

“A lot of the misinformation is due to actual science being less engaging and more nuanced than bold (false) statements.” 

The spread of false information regarding sunscreen reflects a “general public sentiment” about what the products contain, Dahan said. 

WHAT SPF SHOULD YOUR SUNSCREEN HAVE? FIND OUT HOW IT MAY HELP PREMATURE AGING AND SKIN CANCER

“This phenomenon taps into the public’s growing distrust of companies due to the proliferation of harmful chemicals in consumer products,” he said. 

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“Over the years, we have discovered that materials that were deemed as ‘safe’ are highly harmful – from lead, BPA, PFaS and now plastics.”

woman and man spraying sunscreen in a kayak

A rise in cancer rates among young people could be driving a “distrust of companies,” one expert noted. (iStock)

There has also been a rise in cancer rates among young people, Dahan mentioned, which further drives a “healthy distrust of companies and government regulators.”

“When it comes to sunscreen, it seems a lot of the misinformation was driven by an old chemical used decades ago that has since been prohibited, after a contamination event led to a recall,” he said.

Among consumers of social media, Dahan suggested that it is “very difficult to determine what is true if you’re not an expert.” 

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“There are conflicting studies, conflicting opinions from seemingly credible individuals, flat-out false information, and an overall lack of confidence in the private companies making these products and in government regulators,” he said.

Some experts — including Dr. Nicky Gazy, a board-certified dermatologist in Florida — have responded on social media with the recommendation to use sunscreen alternatives that do not contain benzene.

a little girl has sunscreen applied to her face

One dermatologist recommended using zinc-based mineral sunscreen. (iStock)

“When it comes to skin cancer and skin health, any sunscreen is better than no sunscreen,” Gazy said in a TikTok video posted in July 2023.

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To decrease cumulative exposure to “chemical sunscreens,” Gazy recommended wearing a zinc-based mineral sunscreen. 

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“It’s actually what I recommend to my patients, especially my pregnant patients,” he said.

Fox News Digital reached out to Johnson & Johnson for comment.

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