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Space-Saving Exercise Machines

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Space-Saving Exercise Machines
The Sunny Health & Fitness Stair Stepper Climber SF-S021001 is a space-saving machine for enjoying at-home workouts without having to opt for larger or more cumbersome equipment options. The machine is engineered with a slender form that also folds when not in use and won’t make too much noise to maximize its ability to fit into virtually any home. The stepper has an app-connected functionality for tracking workouts with ease, while the adjustable design ensures users can enjoy a customized workout during every use.

The Sunny Health & Fitness Stair Stepper Climber SF-S021001 has an integrated LCD monitor for keeping an eye on workouts and also has a built-in ledge for smartphones or tablets. The exercise machine responds to increased demand for space-saving ways to incorporate workout equipment into any home.

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Fitness

Samantha Prabhu Offers A Peek Into Morning Exercise, Shocks With Her Metabolic Age

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Coming to her health podcast ‘Take 20,’ the actress sat down to have a conversation with wellness coach and nutritionist Alkesh Sharotri for the very first episode, in which she also revealed why she wanted to do a project of this sorts. “The reason I wanted to do this podcast was because after the experience, the harrowing experience that I’ve been through and well, an autoimmune condition is lifelong, so with what I’m dealing with right now as well, I’d rather people be safe than sorry,” she stated. For those caught unversed, the ‘Pushpa’ actress was diagnosed with myositis, which she talked about in October 2022.

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Fitness

How hard should you exercise? New research to determine what’s safe and what’s not

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How hard should you exercise? New research to determine what’s safe and what’s not

It’s the first of its kind for B.C., and it’s going to help fill a cardiovascular research gap in Canada: a new cardiopulmonary exercise test laboratory has opened at UBC Hospital.

“The CPET machine is a core diagnostic tool that can simultaneously look at both the pulmonary and cardiac variables from a health and fitness perspective in individuals while they are exercising, such as heart rate and rhythm, and oxygen consumption,” said Dr. Saul Isserow, Medical Director of SportsCardiologyBC.

In other words, it helps determine how much exercise is safe for people of all ages and fitness abilities.

“Heart disease remains the number one killer in Canada of men and women throughout their life,” he said, adding that the research underway studies a broad spectrum of active people.

“We do see a lot of the younger athletes just to make sure they haven’t got anything they were born with that could put them at risk,” said Isserow, who is also with the Sports Cardiology Department at UBC.

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He also said, that for the first time, seniors, even those in their eighties, are wanting to be more physically active than any previous generation.

“Twenty years ago, when you had a heart attack, you’re told at the most, go for a walk now and again. Now, people have a heart attack, they want to go ride the Gran Fondo, run up Cypress Mountain. So we have to study the safety of all that,” he said.

The new lab is funded through donations raised through the VGH & UBC Hospital Foundation. The lab equipment is about $100,000, but another $1 million was raised to cover ongoing operating costs.

About 1,000 people each year will be tested at the new lab. It will take about 12 months to gather initial research on how much exercise is safe.

Isserow said similar research has been done in the US and Europe, but not in Canada.

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“We need our own data. We have our own unique population,” he said.

The survival rate in Canada for out-of-hospital cardiac arrests, including on the playing field, the hiking trail or in the gym, is just five per cent.

It’s hoped the work done by the lab will not only fill a research gap, but save lives.

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Women Realize More Health Benefits from Exercise than Men, Recent Studies Suggest

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Women Realize More Health Benefits from Exercise than Men, Recent Studies Suggest

In recent years, health and fitness have become popular topics. However, a new study has shed light on a fascinating discovery that challenges the conventional one-size-fits-all approach to exercise. The research, published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, suggests that women reap more health benefits from regular exercise than men, particularly in reducing the risk of early death and fatal cardiovascular events. This revelation has sparked a conversation about the need for gender-specific exercise guidelines.

The Gender Disparity in Exercise Benefits

A comprehensive study involving 412,413 participants over 20 years found that women who engaged in 140 minutes of moderate aerobic exercise per week experienced an 18% reduction in the risk of premature death. In contrast, men required 300 minutes of similar activity to achieve the same benefit. Further, women who exercised regularly saw a 24% decrease in mortality risk from any cause and a 36% lower risk of fatal heart events. Meanwhile, men who exercised experienced a 15% reduction in the risk of death and a 14% lower risk of fatal heart events.

The research, supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), notes that only 33% of women and 43% of men meet the standard for weekly aerobic exercise, with 20% of women and 28% of men completing a weekly strength training session. The study attributes the differences in outcomes between the genders to variations in anatomy and physiology.

Understanding the Physiological Differences

One theory suggests that women make faster and more significant gains in muscular strength when they work out, contributing to the disparity in benefits observed. The data also reveals that people who are female tend to exercise with less frequency and intensity than those who are male. Additionally, the reduced mortality risk from weekly moderate to vigorous aerobic activity eventually plateaus for both sexes. However, men have to exercise more than twice as long as women to realize the same results.

The Need for Gender-Specific Exercise Guidelines

These findings challenge the current Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, which recommend adults get at least 2.5-5 hours of moderate-intensity exercise or 1.25-2.5 hours of vigorous exercise each week. The study emphasizes the importance of tailored guidelines based on sex, suggesting that a more personalized approach to exercise could be more beneficial.

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While the research provides valuable insights, the team cautions that the study is based on self-reported exercise and did not account for physical activity associated with household chores. Despite this, the results highlight the need for further research to understand the impact of gender on exercise benefits fully.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the study presents compelling evidence that women may gain more health benefits from regular exercise than men. This discovery underscores the need for sex-specific exercise guidelines. It’s essential to emphasize that, regardless of gender, regular physical activity remains an effective way to maintain good health and reduce the risk of various diseases. As we continue to unravel the complexities of gender differences in health, it’s clear that a more personalized approach to exercise could pave the way for improved health outcomes for all.

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