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THE BLUE ANGELS Review

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THE BLUE ANGELS Review
THE BLUE ANGELS is a very captivating documentary on IMAX and Amazon Prime about the famous Navy exhibition team. The movie explores a year in the life of a particular team as they go through training, exhibitions and then retirement from the Blue Angels. The movie starts by telling viewers that the Navy has about 3700 combat pilots in active duty every year. Out of that, six are chosen to be members of the Blue Angels for about two years. In January, the six men featured in the movie are put through intensive training for three months. Their exhibitions feature flying that’s absolutely amazing for its need for precision and perfection. After training, the pilots travel the country like a sports team or rock band to 32 shows. Toward the end of their year-long exhibitions, the pilots choose the people to replace them.

THE BLUE ANGELS is an excellent family movie. It will inspire children and adults. Except for one very light obscenity, this one of the cleanest, most wholesome movies since the Golden Age of Hollywood. It’s highly recommended by MOVIEGUIDE®.

(BBB, PPP, L, V):

Dominant Worldview and Other Worldview Content/Elements:

Extremely moral worldview promoting excellence, teamwork and graciousness between the superior pilots who are chosen to be part of The Blue Angels jet plane exhibition team of the United States Navy for two years, with some pro-family themes;

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Foul Language:

One “a…h…” obscenity;

Violence:

No depicted violence but exciting and dangerous maneuvers at very high speeds and reports about the 28 Blue Angel pilots who died during their expositions and several pilots chosen to be Blue Angeles pass out in the G forces experienced in a centrifuge;

Sex:

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No sex, but discussions of how much the pilots love their families and family reunions;

Nudity:

No nudity;

Alcohol Use:

No alcohol;

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Smoking and/or Drug Use and Abuse:

No smoking or drugs; and,

Miscellaneous Immorality:

Nothing else objectionable.

THE BLUE ANGELS is a very captivating documentary on IMAX and Amazon Prime about the famous Navy exhibition team and a year in the life of a particular team as they go through training , exhibitions and then retirement from the Blue Angels. THE BLUE ANGELS is one of the most moral, uplifting and positive movies ever made.

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The movie starts by telling viewers that the Navy has about 3700 combat pilots in active duty every year. Out of that, six are chosen to be members of the Blue Angels for two years. In January, the six men featured in the movie are put through intensive training for three months. Their exhibitions feature flying that is absolutely amazing for its need for precision and perfection. For instance, in the famous Navy diamond, six planes fly at over 400 mph extremely close to each other with just a few inches between their wings, so one little slipup can cause a disaster.

At El Centro, Calif., their flying involves experiencing seven Gs on a centrifuge, which forces the blood down into your feet and causes pilots to pass out. Some of them do pass out in training on the centrifuge later in the movie. Of course, you can’t mess up when you’re flying wingtip to wingtip. So, each pilot must get incredible control of their body, mentally and physically. The crew chief spends hours every day talking to them about their procedures.

After training, the pilots travel the country like a sports team or a rock band to perform 32 shows around the country. At one point during those shows, they return to Pensacola, Florida, which is the official home of the Blue Angels. There, they’re united with their wives and children. Many of their wives are also serving in the Navy. During this part of the movie, they discuss the 141 Blue Angels support people, with each pilot having his own support team.

Toward the end of their year-long exhibitions, the pilots choose the people to replace them. Choosing the boss is extremely difficult. Pilots who serve their two years on the Blue Angels, return to active service in the Navy. For the first time during this movie, the Navy appoints a woman to be a member of the Blue Angels, leaving it open ended whether she can perform under the stress to achieve perfection.

The last part of the movie shows a little bit of the history of the Blue Angels and the fact it was started by Admiral Nimitz in 1946 to show the world the Navy’s prowess in flying in planes as well as in ships. Many of the pilots testify they saw a Blue Angels exhibition when they were six and even four years old, and therefore caught the vision of becoming member of this elite team.

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THE BLUE ANGELS is an excellent family movie. It will inspire children and adults. Except for one very light obscenity, this one of the cleanest, most wholesome movies since the Golden Age of Hollywood. It’s highly recommended by MOVIEGUIDE®.

4000+ Faith Based Articles and Movie Reviews – Will you Support Us?

Our small team works tirelessly to provide resources to protect families from harmful media, reviewing 415 movies/shows and writing 3,626 uplifting articles this year. We believe that the gospel can transform entertainment. That’s why we emphasize positive and faith-filled articles and entertainment news, and release hundreds of Christian movie reviews to the public, for free. No paywalls, just trusted, biblically sound content to bless you and your family. Online, Movieguide is the closest thing to a biblical entertainment expert at your fingertips. As a reader-funded operation, we welcome any and all contributions – so if you can, please give something. It won’t take more than 52 seconds (we timed it for you). Thank you.

4000+ Faith Based Articles and Movie Reviews – Will you Support Us?

Our small team works tirelessly to provide resources to protect families from harmful media, reviewing 415 movies/shows and writing 3,626 uplifting articles this year. We believe that the gospel can transform entertainment. That’s why we emphasize positive and faith-filled articles and entertainment news, and release hundreds of Christian movie reviews to the public, for free. No paywalls, just trusted, biblically sound content to bless you and your family. Online, Movieguide is the closest thing to a biblical entertainment expert at your fingertips. As a reader-funded operation, we welcome any and all contributions – so if you can, please give something. It won’t take more than 52 seconds (we timed it for you). Thank you.

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Movie Reviews

Film Review: Galaxies (2024) by Choi Jung-han

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Film Review: Galaxies (2024) by Choi Jung-han

“We’re galaxies that lighten the dark stage”

Using music as a plot device, first-time director Choi Jung-han puts dreams and friendships under the scanner in his debut work “Galaxies”.

Eun-soo, Eun-ha and Dong-eun are three friends who form the band Eun-Ha-Soo, literally “Galaxies”. Eun-soo and Eun-ha are a couple who ran away from a music production company to showcase their individuality but, not least because of their age and said individuality, labels find them highly unmarketable and the three struggle to make ends meet. When Dong-eun, who is known to chronically invest in bad stock, takes and invests the band’s savings, loses it all and runs away, the angry Eun-soo and Eun-ha, who had let him stay in their apartment when he fell behind on rent, take an old guitar of Dong-eun’s and sell it on a marketplace. However, when Dong-eun returns with the money, they must trace back the guitar, which holds a lot of sentimental value to Dong-eun, and reunite him with it. 

Through the story of these three middle-aged friends, Choi Jung-han, who co-wrote the script with Ha Won-joon, partly takes a look at the nature of one’s dreams and the price one has to pay to achieve them. The three are adamant on keeping their originality and identity, such as it may be, even if it comes with a lack of success and financial hardship. Choi, however, keeps things fairly positive and light despite the circumstances, using comedy for this effect. The comedy doesn’t always land though, with a lot of gags just proving a little inadequate for the occasion. The payoff of the irritable bowel syndrome running gag, however, is effective. 

The second half of the feature is dedicated to the trio’s efforts to reclaim the sold guitar and the writing falters a bit here. While their adventures are interesting and often funny in their setup, some key elements are forgotten or disregarded along the way, like Dong-eun taking advance pay from his new job and never returning to it, for example. In addition to the adventures they have to go through to find their guitar, the internal journeys that the three have to go to find themselves as they meet all the various characters on their way to the guitar and, by extension, find their music as well is an interesting element of the story and one that works the most. The feature is in fact at its best when it is about the trio’s music. 

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Choi manages to enlist a trio of dependable character actors to play his lead bandmates. Yoon Je-moon, probably the most well known of the three, is always a joy to watch and “Galaxies” is no different. An actor who’s known to do both comedy and even villainous roles convincingly, he gets ample scope to shine here, as Dong-eun has one of the better internal journeys of the three, which Yoon portrays impressively. Kim Ji-hoon, who mostly does bit-part roles but is probably best known for playing Helsinki in Netflix’s “Money Heist: Korea – Joint Security Area”, is fun to watch as Eun-ha, and is called upon the most to provide comedy to the proceedings. Lee Shi-ah, meanwhile, may best best known to K-Drama viewers but is adorable as Eun-soo. The matriarch of the group, her outbursts in her own cute way are hilarious.

Despite being a story about music and musicians, the music in “Galaxies” is somewhat of a letdown. The background score is appropriate, but none of the songs manage to register as impressive, or even hummable. The ones in the beginning of the film are understandably so, as the story demands it, but the couple of songs that appear later on do not leave much of an impression. The bright cinematography, on the other hand, does impress, with the images being vivid and immersive throughout.

Ultimately, as far as low-budget productions go, “Galaxies” is a perfectly cute film and a breezy time as a whole, but it is not without its faults, particularly in the writing department, which do bring the overall enjoyment of it down and are complicit in the feature failing to leave a lasting impression.

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Dead Dead Demon’s Dededede Destruction Part 2 Anime Film Review

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Dead Dead Demon’s Dededede Destruction Part 2 Anime Film Review

Dead Dead Demon’s Dededede Destruction Part 2 is a film I never want to watch again. However, this is not because it’s bad. Rather, it’s a testament to just how incredible this film is.

The film is full of well-developed and memorable characters—especially its lead trio, Ouran, Kadode, and Ooba. It’s wonderfully animated—combining cartoony character designs with ultra-violence to create something shocking and memorable. To top it off, it has incredibly strong themes conveyed with maximum impact through excellent storytelling.

What makes it hard to watch (or want to rewatch) is the simple fact that it feels too damn real. Despite the aliens, UFOs, super-lasers, and Doraemon-inspired gadgets, this is a film that is bound and determined to drag humanity and modern society into the spotlight—to use sci-fi trappings to put our blemishes on full display.

The central conceit of Dead Dead Demon’s Dededede Destruction is the idea that humans can (and will) get used to anything. Even when confronted with a world-changing event—like, say, the existence of alien life or a UFO floating above Tokyo for years—humanity as a whole doesn’t change. Instead, we just go on about our lives as usual. If it doesn’t directly affect us, we put it out of our minds.

This film kicks it up a notch from the first by showing that even things like public genocide are passively accepted by the masses. Even those who feel compelled to act do so with things like peaceful protests—basically doing nothing to directly help those in need, all while convincing themselves that they’re heroes fighting oppression. But then again, what is there that they can do? This film perfectly captures the masses’ self-righteousness and utter helplessness in the face of the apathetic, the powerful, and the government.

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The movie is a damningly pessimistic look at humankind as a whole. The world is full of things we can’t control. People driven by their zeal or self-interest will crush the weak underfoot—never noticing or caring about those they’ve destroyed. In such a world, our only hope is to find something we care about and do all we can to protect it. That is the beautiful yet horrible message of this film.

While this story is full of villains and innocents, it’s hard to say there are any true heroes. Oh sure, we may sympathize with Ouran and Ooba, but the two of them ultimately have a body count that surpasses government genocide squads and vigilante alien killers alike. Yet, throughout the film, we root for the pair. If nothing else, we can see that they are working for, if not altruistic reasons, then for human ones that we can understand on a deeply personal level. Love is their driving motivation—even if they’re forced to accept the cost of that love by the time the credits roll.

In the end, Dead Dead Demon’s Dededede Destruction Part 2 is a powerful film that will leave you depressed about the state of the world. It puts the foolishness of humanity on full display and concludes that there is no easy fix—that no force, internal or external, will appear and make everything alright. All we can do is take our happiness where we can get it—and sometimes, we may find ourselves in the right place at the right time to make things just a little bit better.

…Or maybe we’ll die horribly due to events wholly outside of our control.

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Memorial Day Movie Review: A Tribute to Sacrifice and Service –

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Memorial Day Movie Review: A Tribute to Sacrifice and Service –

A staff report

Title: Memorial Day
Director: Samuel Fischer
Starring: James Reynolds, Sarah Connors, Michael O’Neal
Genre: Drama/War
Rating: PG-13

“Memorial Day” is a powerful drama that weaves together the past and present in a poignant tribute to the sacrifices made by service members and their families. Directed by Samuel Fischer, this film stands out for its emotional depth and compelling storytelling.

The narrative unfolds through the eyes of Kyle Vogel (James Reynolds), a young man who discovers his grandfather Bud’s (Michael O’Neal) World War II footlocker on Memorial Day. What begins as a simple curiosity turns into a profound journey as Bud reluctantly opens up about his wartime experiences. The film seamlessly transitions between the present day and flashbacks to the 1940s, showcasing Bud’s harrowing and heroic moments on the battlefield.

James Reynolds delivers a heartfelt performance as Kyle, whose growing understanding and appreciation of his grandfather’s sacrifices mirror the audience’s own emotional journey. Michael O’Neal is exceptional as Bud, capturing the quiet strength and lingering pain of a man who lived through unimaginable horrors. Sarah Connors, playing Kyle’s mother and Bud’s daughter, adds another layer of depth to the family dynamic, highlighting the generational impact of war.

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The cinematography and production design deserve special mention, effectively transporting viewers from the calm of modern-day Minnesota to the chaotic frontlines of World War II. The film’s score, composed by Jonathan Miller, enhances the emotional resonance of key scenes without overpowering them.

“Memorial Day” is not just a war movie; it’s a meditation on memory, legacy, and the enduring bonds of family. It reminds us that the impacts of war extend far beyond the battlefield, affecting generations and shaping lives in ways that are often unseen.

While the film does not shy away from the brutal realities of war, it also offers moments of hope and resilience. It’s a fitting tribute to the men and women who have served and a reminder of the importance of remembering their stories.

In conclusion, “Memorial Day” is a moving and thoughtful film that honors the sacrifices of the past while connecting them to the present. It’s a must-watch for anyone looking to understand the true meaning of this solemn holiday.

Rating: 4.5/5 Stars

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