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Media layoffs mount as CNN announces it will make cuts this week

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Media layoffs mount as CNN announces it will make cuts this week

CNN workers are in for a tough week because the information community’s chief, Chris Licht, instructed workers to arrange for a spherical of layoffs.

The cuts have been anticipated, as CNN dad or mum Warner Bros. Discovery is on the lookout for value reductions throughout the corporate because it tries to carry down debt.

Like the remainder of the normal TV enterprise, CNN can also be taking a look at a future with slowed development in pay-TV subscription income and a softening promoting market.

Licht stated in a memo that these dropping their jobs could be notified Wednesday or Thursday. He didn’t element the extent of the cuts.

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In line with folks acquainted with the discussions contained in the community, on-air contributors will probably be among the many first to be taught whether or not they’re being let go.

Contributors aren’t workers however are underneath contract to function speaking heads or consultants showing solely on the community. Most are stored on an annual retainer and are paid within the low six figures. Greater names earn as a lot as $500,000 a 12 months.

Information divisions are inclined to bulk up contributors for main ongoing tales, such because the COVID-19 pandemic and the impeachment hearings. CNN is claimed to have greater than 200 contributors.

One individual acquainted with the discussions stated the cuts are prone to deal with workers in New York and Atlanta.

Licht has already stated the community will in the reduction of at CNN Authentic Sequence, the unit that acquires and produces documentary sequence and movies.

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CNN is amongst a rising record of media entities present process belt-tightening measures as cord-cutting chips away on the pay-TV subscription charges that assist maintain conventional TV retailers. The marketplace for TV business time can also be softening, regardless of knowledge that reveals the economic system shouldn’t be in a recession.

AMC Networks introduced it would make important cuts throughout its enterprise. Walt Disney Co. has additionally stated it would impose a hiring freeze; Comcast has provided buyouts to longtime workers; and Paramount World is decreasing personnel as a part of an organization reorganization.

CBS on Wednesday introduced a reorganization of its TV studios group that may also lead to an undisclosed variety of layoffs.

Streaming firms have additionally decreased workers, with Roku reducing 200 positions in response to a downturn in its promoting enterprise.

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Kate Middleton spotted after rampant speculation about her post-op whereabouts

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Kate Middleton spotted after rampant speculation about her post-op whereabouts

Catherine has been spotted for the first time since December, months after her January hospitalization, which spawned rampant conspiracy theories, and viral suppositions about her alleged “disappearance.”

The Princess of Wales, formerly Kate Middleton, was photographed Monday by Backgrid, a photo-hosting agency, near Windsor Castle in the U.K. sitting in the passenger seat of an Audi driven by her mother, Carole Middleton, according to TMZ.

The Daily Mail reported that Monday’s princess sighting came via paparazzi pictures that were not authorized by the palace.

The casual outing — featuring the princess in sunglasses and without security — is the first time that the 42-year-old has been seen in public since she celebrated Christmas at Sandringham estate in eastern England with husband Prince William, their three children and rest of the royal family, People reported.

The senior royal was admitted to the London Clinic on Jan. 16, Kensington Palace said, for a planned abdominal surgery and successfully underwent the procedure. The palace added, however, that the princess was expected to be hospitalized for 10 to 14 days after the mystery surgery and “before returning home to continue her recovery.” She would return to her public duties after Easter — March 31 — based on current medical advice, the palace said.

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“The Princess of Wales appreciates the interest this statement will generate,” Kensington Palace said. “She hopes that the public will understand her desire to maintain as much normality for her children as possible; and her wish that her personal medical information remains private.”

Despite her desires, the announcement — coupled with father-in-law King Charles III’s simultaneous health issues — ignited even more interest in her condition and plenty of wild speculation given her absence from the public eye, as well as that of her children and parents. Amid theories about an organ donation to Charles, a Brazilian butt lift, mommy makeover or the possibility that she was in a coma, the topic (hashtag #whereiskatemiddleton) has been a talking point ever since.

As many a Redditor and casual social media user wondered, “What is going on with Kate Middleton?” the BBC analyzed the “royal dilemma” over Kate’s health, the New York Times touched on the rumors swirling around her, Vogue tracked “The Curious Case of the ‘Disappearing’ Princess,” and this newspaper tried to figure out what the frenzy over her alleged “‘disappearance’ says about the royals — and us.”

Kate left the hospital on Jan. 29 and returned to Adelaide Cottage in Windsor, where she was reunited with her kids. Prince William, the second in line to the British throne, temporarily stepped back from his royal duties to manage childcare but continued with other royal engagements in Wrexham and London.

Last week, the 41-year-old prince — who is also expected to take on more royal duties after his father’s cancer diagnosis — provided further fodder for the rumor mill when he cited a “personal matter” for his absence from the funeral of his godfather, King Constantine of Greece.

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Nonetheless, a spokesman reiterated the palace’s stance that there would be no “running commentary” provided on Kate’s health despite Internet rumors.

That, according to the Telegraph, was testing the Firm’s policy of “never complain, never explain.”

“From our perspective, we were very clear from our statement at the start of this in January that the Princess of Wales planned to be out of public action until after Easter, and that hasn’t changed,” a spokesperson for the family told the Telegraph.

“We were always clear we wouldn’t be providing updates when there wasn’t anything new to share,” the spokesperson said. “The last thing anyone wants is a running commentary of the Princess of Wales’s recovery. Nothing has changed from that approach in January.”

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Film review: Ru brings Kim Thúy's beloved novel to achingly beautiful life — Stir

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Film review: Ru brings Kim Thúy's beloved novel to achingly beautiful life — Stir

AUTHOR KIM THÚY’S Governor General’s Award–winning novel Ru gives unique access to the refugee experience, following her family from Vietnam across the ocean to a new life in Canada. But what makes the book, and the extraordinary new movie based on it, so touching is the specific mix of that story with the French-Canadian culture that the family learns to call its own. 

In his new screen adaptation, Canadian director Charles-Olivier Michaud finds the warmth and humour in everything from a stepdance welcome in a community gym to the healing magic of maple taffy made on fresh snow. Or ham decorated with canned pineapple chunks and maraschino cherries. Or a fridge full of donated shepherd pies. 

The story is told nonchronologically, through the eyes of preteen Tinh (a remarkably unaffected Chloé Djandji) and following her family’s harrowing journey from upper-class comfort in Vietnam to the refugees once known as “boat people”, eventually starting over again in Canada. The culture shock is immediate: upon arrival in Quebec, the trip into Granby is by bus, through a blizzard, following a snowplow. In one of Michaud’s poetically surreal moments, a wide-eyed Tinh spots a new bride, crying and drinking champagne, still wearing her long white gown, on the hall floor of the motel the family calls home for many weeks. 

The script (by Thuy working with Michaud and Jacques Davidts)  uses restraint but never glosses over the trauma the parents and their children carry with them into their new lives. Via flashbacks, we see soldiers ransacking the family’s books and belongings, and witness the inhumanity of the dank boat hold. Through assured visual storytelling, Ru lets us in on the experience of forced migration—specifically, the trials, big and small, that “boat people” faced—whether it’s a parent sewing money into shirt hems or a camera slowly panning through a garment factory. In one scene, Tinh’s mother (a steely Chantal Thuy) stares from the ship hull, up a long ladder to the first daylight she’s seen in weeks. It’s a complex mix of despair about what’s behind her and fear of the unknown that awaits at the top of the hatch. Later, she refuses to speak to her daughter and two young sons in anything but French, and drives them to study harder. At the same time, the parents’ sacrifices are moving, the educated father (a quietly dignified Jean Bui) mopping cathedral floors and delivering Chinese food. What’s so poignant is that everyone’s too busy to pay too much attention to the growing pains and trauma that Tinh is quietly navigating herself—at a time when PTSD wasn’t a term yet, and everyone, even children, were expected to tough things out.

To his credit, director Michaud chooses not to tell this story through a lot of dialogue, but rather through imagery and often achingly beautiful visual details. A perfect symbol of all of the cultural upheaval comes with recurring shots of a second-hand toaster, which a kind Quebec sponsor assumes will be a necessity for the Vietnamese family’s breakfasts, but that becomes a chopstick holder abandoned in a corner. 

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Oscars rewind — 2004: Why the hair and makeup winners apologized to their cast

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Oscars rewind — 2004: Why the hair and makeup winners apologized to their cast

Many of the Academy Awards categories have long histories that stretch back nearly 100 years. That’s not true for the hair and makeup artisans, though. Their artistry was left out of the awards prior to 1981, when a groundswell of support for the recognition of the work done on 1980’s “The Elephant Man” led to the creation of a makeup-only category (and “Elephant” wasn’t the first winner). Hair wasn’t included until 1993, and is still considered part of the package deal, now known as the Academy Award for makeup and hairstyling.

Meanwhile, hair and makeup nominees are chosen slightly differently than most other categories — a shortlist of seven titles are selected by the academy’s makeup branch, then winnowed down during a “bake-off” into a final list of nominees (usually three). Such was the case for the 2004 Oscars, held on Feb. 29 at the Kodak Theatre in Hollywood: Three nominees, one winner.

The winners likely surprised no one in the audience. By the time the award was handed out by Scarlett Johansson to Richard Taylor and Peter King, their film “The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King,” was already well on its way to earning all 11 awards for its 11 nominations. It was Taylor’s second chance on stage that night; earlier in the evening he’d picked up his first Oscar for the film’s costume design, an award he shared with Ngila Dickson. He also has previous Oscars for makeup (shared with Peter Owen) and visual effects (shared with Jim Rygiel, Randall William Cook and Mark Stetson) from 2002 for the first film in the trilogy, “The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring.”

Taylor shared the applause in his speech, crediting several other crew members who were instrumental with the manufacture and care of over 10,000 prosthetics used during the “Lord of the Rings” series of films. He also then spoke to the various former Middle Earth residents in the audience, giving credit to “the cast that had to wear it all over all those months. I apologize for the rubbery feet and funny noses but cheers to you all.”

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King was picking up his first (and so far, only) Oscar; he’d go on to be nominated again in 2013 for “The Hobbit: an Unexpected Journey.” “God, it’s scary up here,” he said. After thanking the studio and fellow crew, he added, “I’d like to thank my gorgeous wife Sarah for being there every night with a glass of wine when I got home. I thank my gorgeous daughter for just being gorgeous.”

The other two nominees that went home certainly presented formidable competition, but it was hard to deny “King’s” dominance. Edouard F. Henriques and Yolanda Toussieng had been nominated for “Master & Commander: The Far Side of the World.” This was Henriques’ second of three nominations; he would be tapped in 2011 for working on another Peter Weir-helmed film, “The Way Back,” and his first nomination came from work on “The Cell” in 2001. Meanwhile, Toussieng won two Oscars in back-to-back-years: 1994 for “Mrs. Doubtfire” and 1995 for “Ed Wood”; she also would be nominated for working with Henriques and Greg Funk on “The Way Back.”

Completing the trio of long-titled nominated movies were Ve Neill and Martin Samuel, who were nominated for their work on “Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl.” Neill already was well-stocked with Oscars — she has three, from “Beetlejuice” (1989, shared with Steve LaPorte and Robert Short); “Mrs. Doubtfire” (shared with her competitor this year Toussieng and Greg Cannom); and “Ed Wood” (shared with Toussieng and Rick Baker).

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