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Renting, and your A/C goes out? Nevada law and your rights

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Renting, and your A/C goes out? Nevada law and your rights


LAS VEGAS, Nev. (FOX5) – FOX5 is looking into Nevada law and your rights and options if you’re renting and your A/C goes out.

FOX5 heard from a woman named “Kim” who had trouble with her A/C since she moved in, back in April. She said her A/C did not work very well or at all, and showed FOX5 screen grabs of temperatures inside soaring to 97 degrees with the thermostat set at 74 degrees.

She tells FOX5 that property management with Cape Cod apartments did repeatedly send out a maintenance worker, but the string of repairs did not help. She said the maintenance worker told her to set the temperature to 74 degrees, with not much success to lowering the inside temperature.

“I guess we had a heat wave. And then we winded up having extremely high [temperatures] in here,” Kim said to FOX5. She ended up calling the newsroom to ask for help and any relief.

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By the time FOX5 called Kim back, she reported that her A/C unit was completely replaced. She faced a different problem: her NV Energy bill soared to $700 for two months, and Kim worries that her broken A/C and thermostat set to 74 degrees led to the high bill.

FOX5 reached out to her management company to ask if and how they could assist with the bill; a representative with the company responded to our email, stating that the matter was a private matter between the tenant and management.

FOX5 turned to Legal Aid Center of Southern Nevada for help. Your A/C is considered an “essential service” under state law, and your landlord must provide that service and repairs.

“We see it here almost every single day. We’ll also see at the Civil Law Self Help Center. What are my rights? What do I have to do?” said consumer rights attorney Harrison Bohn.

Bohn walks us through the steps you can and should take.

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1) Send your landlord a notice. You must give a written notice, keep a copy and document how and when you sent it, via email, text or certified mail. You can use a copy from the Civil Law Self-Center’s sample letter. “You need to have that paper trail, especially if you get in front of a judge,” Bohn said.

2) Wait. You must give your landlord 48 hours, not including holidays or weekends, for them to respond and fix the problem.

3) Enforce your rights if the landlord does not repair your unit. You can exercise options that include:

º Paying for repairs, and deducting the amount from your rent.

º Getting a hotel or another option to stay. “Try and find something that’s very comparable to your rent, but also communicate all these costs to your landlord the entire time,” Bohn said.

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º If repairs are not made, withhold your rent until the landlord has attempted to restore essential services.

If you withhold rent, you may run into a scenario where your landlord pursues an eviction. According to the Civil Law Self Help Center, respond to any notices from the court.

If you withheld rent, you must pay it to the court. “That’s showing the judge that ‘it’s never been about the money I can pay. I just want to live in somewhere that’s habitable,” Bohn said.

For a guide of what to do in these scenarios, click here: Essential Services and Your Rent

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Nevada

The 'tear it down' vote • Nevada Current

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The 'tear it down' vote • Nevada Current


This weekend I did a bit of doomscrolling about the global erosion of support for democracy, which research indicates is particularly pronounced among people in their 30s and 40s.

I was reminded of a finding in one of those NYT-Sienna polls a while back that showed Trump crushing Biden in Nevada.

“Which comes closest to your view about the political and economic system in America, even if none are exactly right?” the poll asked.

Among Nevada voters aged 30 to 44, an unsettling (to me anyway) 22% – more than any other age group – picked “The system needs to be torn down entirely.” Needless to say poll respondents said Trump was the one most likely to “tear down the system completely.”

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I was also reminded of remarks (that have been getting a lot of attention this week) made by Republican nominee for vice president J.D. Vance in 2021 as he was ramping up his 2022 Senate bid.

“I think Trump is going to run again in 2024,” Vance said on a podcast. “I think that what Trump should do, if I was giving him one piece of advice: Fire every single midlevel bureaucrat, every civil servant in the administrative state, replace them with our people.”

“And when the courts stop you,” Vance continued, “stand before the country, and say ‘the chief justice has made his ruling. Now let him enforce it.’”

That last line of course is reportedly what Andrew Jackson infamously said after the Supreme Court ruled against the state of Georgia’s unconstitutional seizure of Cherokee land in the 1830s. (Supreme Court Chief Justice John Marshall could not enforce a ruling – it’s not like the Supreme Court has federal troops to enforce its ruling. But Jackson had some, which he sent to help Georgia push Cherokees into the deadly forced march to Oklahoma.)

Early this month the Supreme Court ruled that Trump (and theoretically any president, but the ruling was specifically aimed at protecting Trump) can break the law with immunity. Vance’s earlier concern that the U.S. Supreme Court might attempt to stop Trump from doing … anything at all … now seems outdated.

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When people, their businesses, their families, their assets or their property, are hurt or jeopardized, sometimes they seek or rely on protection or remedy from the law. How will Nevadans, – especially the one in five of them aged 30 to 44 who say “the system needs to be torn down entirely” – feel if, along with democracy, the rule of law is discarded, replaced with an arbitrary cronyism that rewards those who are in favor with Trump and his courtiers and punishes those who aren’t?

Meanwhile, polling also suggests a number of voters, including and especially those in younger cohorts, may not be MAGA, but have become numbed enough by years of relentless Trumpism to consider voting for him anyway. If for no other reason than to, you know, shake things up.

Polling also suggests a number of voters have no use for Trump but they’re sick of the whole show and won’t vote at all, a decision which also works to Trump’s favor.

The U.S. has been flawed from the start, and still is. But relative to other world-historical global powers, it has a hell of a story to tell about the expansion of rights and freedom and prosperity.

Good gawd yes it’s imperfect. Opportunity, prosperity, and economic and social justice are not near as broadly and fairly shared as they should be.

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But tossing aside the nation’s political and legal institutions and empowering a narcissistic sociopath as a quasi-monarch because prices went up a lot after covid seems a bit much.



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BOOMTOWN: Nevada's Newest FASTEST-GROWING City

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BOOMTOWN: Nevada's Newest FASTEST-GROWING City


If you’ve lived in the area for AT LEAST the last quarter century, you probably remember when Mesquite was thriving, growing, and was quite exciting. In the early 2000’s, Mesquite began to collapse. They shut down the Oasis, then tore it down (for some reason). Local businesses went under, and before you knew it, Mesquite didn’t have much going on. Well, all those things are changing for this small town just outside of Las Vegas.

MESQUITE IS THE FASTEST GROWING CITY IN NEVADA!

According to the US Census Bureau, Mesquite is now Nevada’s fastest-growing city. The city is predicted to continue its rapid expansion, with its population expected to double by 2044. Their population is currently around 20,000 with the average age around 62 years old. 45% of the population is considered a snowbird, someone that only lives in the city during the late fall, winter, and early springtime.

Mesquite has over 2,000 vacant houses, but only 16% of those homes are for sale!

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Nevada’s TOP GROWING cities in the state:

  1. Mesquite
  2. North Las Vegas
  3. Fernley
  4. Henderson
  5. Reno
  6. Las Vegas
  7. Sparks
  8. Elko

From the start of the pandemic until now, Mesquite’s population has jumped a whopping 10%! But, would this sway you to buying a home in Mesquite and living full-time there? What would it take for Mesquite to have before you’d consider buying a home and moving there full time? A shopping mall? A Costco? Or maybe you’d be ready to move to Mesquite today! Well, over the next 20 years, Mesquite will definitely be a totally different place!





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I-49 lane closures in Nevada for pavement upgrades

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I-49 lane closures in Nevada for pavement upgrades


NEVADA, Mo. — Here’s a heads-up for drivers in Nevada. Beginning today MoDOT crews will be working on I-49 pavement improvements in Nevada.

Starting at 7:00 p.m. to 6:00 a.m. July 20 through July 26.

Lanes running north and southbound of I-49 between Highland Avenue and the bridges over the railroad in Nevada will be closed.

Crews will be adding a high-friction pavement treatment in multiple areas to try and help improve traction on curves.

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Various selected routes in McDonald, Stone, Taney, and Vernon counties are also a part of the project.

Drivers are urged to stay alert of signs and messages, as MoDOT crews will be directing traffic through flagger vehicles.

It’s also encouraged to find alternative routes in the meantime.



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