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Republicans launch seven-figure ad campaign in North Carolina attacking Democrat Josh Stein on immigration – Washington Examiner

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Republicans launch seven-figure ad campaign in North Carolina attacking Democrat Josh Stein on immigration – Washington Examiner


The Republican Governors Association announced it is launching an initial seven-figure ad campaign attacking Democratic North Carolina Attorney General Josh Stein on illegal immigration.

The ad, titled “Weak,” features Stein, who is running to be the state’s next governor, stating in a media interview, “There are no sanctuary cities in North Carolina.” It then features a slide that says “Josh Stein is lying to you.”

Davidson County Sheriff Richie Simmons, a Republican, then says, “Here is the truth: Several North Carolina counties are refusing to cooperate with deportation officials.”

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The ad continues, showing mug shots and stating, “All of these criminal illegal aliens were released back on the street, including a sex offender.” The 30-second spot features Stein twice saying, “I just don’t think it’s real,” though no context is given.

Simmons then says, “Trust me, the threat is very real.”

The RGA said in a statement, “‘Weak’ exposes Josh Stein for lying to North Carolina families as he claims there are ‘no sanctuary cities’ in North Carolina when the reality is that counties across North Carolina are taking dangerous stands and refusing to cooperate with immigration officials.”

Stein is running against Republican Lt. Gov. Mark Robinson to be the state’s next governor. The race is one of the most hotly contested gubernatorial races in the country.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE FROM THE WASHINGTON EXAMINER

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There are no sanctuary cities in North Carolina because then-Republican Gov. Pat McCrory signed a bill into law in 2015 outlawing such places. However, the state does not force local officials to comply with federal immigration officials, which lawmakers have recently addressed.

The Washington Examiner reached out to Stein’s campaign about the ad but did not receive a response.



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Old country store on the Haw River keeps NC traditions alive

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Old country store on the Haw River keeps NC traditions alive


There was a time when old-fashioned general stores carried the memories and stores of rural North Carolina — locals sitting in rocking chairs on the front porch, somebody picking a guitar while the older folks swap stories and kids run in and out buying penny candy and bubblegum.

Today, many of those old country stores can be found decaying along rural North Carolina roadsides. With antique paint curling on fading storefronts, their drooping wooden porches are only fit for ghosts – and no one can hear their stories.

Bynum Front Porch was originally the general store for the small mill town of Bynum.

But tucked away down the winding rural roads of NC, there’s a place not far from the Triangle where the old traditions continue – where you can sit in a rocking chair and listen to local music on the front porch on a balmy summer evening. Or, in the fall, you can bundle up with cider on a crisp afternoon and listen to authentic storytellers keep our state’s country lore alive.

Almost a century old, stepping into Bynum’s general store is like stepping back in time. It’s one of the few remaining original stores from the historic mill village, which sits on the bank of the Haw River.

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On a summer evening, you might see people dancing barefoot in the grass while a musician strums the guitar, or families running down to play near the river. There’s a food truck on-site, and several locals sitting on the front porch in rocking chairs.

Nearly a centuy old, Bynum Front Porch was originally the general store for the small rural mill town of Bynum.
Nearly a centuy old, Bynum Front Porch was originally the general store for the small rural mill town of Bynum.

Many of the dozen or so original stores in the unincorporated community of Bynum have closed their doors over the decades. In fact, Bynum itself has faded from the maps, losing its zip code, post office, movie theater and central cotton mill over the decades after a bypass funneled traffic away from the town.

However, the vibrant community refuses to let their way of life – or their history – just fade away.

Bynum Front Porch now holds a popular summer music series each Friday night.
Bynum Front Porch now holds a popular summer music series each Friday night.

Bynum Front Porch: Step back in time in Chatham County

Fueled by volunteers and community members, these old store keeps the Old North State’s legacy of storytelling, music and community alive.

“I was born within a stone’s throw of the store,” said Ted Williams, a native of Bynum.

Williams’ parents built the general store, now known as Bynum Front Porch, in the mid-1930s. Before that, both his parents worked at the cotton mill, which was central to Bynum’s existence. Families lived in traditional mill houses, and kept entertained by visiting the five or six stores in downtown. There was also a movie theater and a school.

“It was a vibrant community,” says Williams. “There was a lot of traffic through here at the time.”

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Bymum Front Porch was originally the general store for the small mill town of Bynum, NC.
Bymum Front Porch was originally the general store for the small mill town of Bynum, NC.

As a kid, Williams recalls sitting on the porch, where people gathered to tell stores, swap jokes and laugh and talk with each other.

“I remember sitting down here and just listening to the grown folks talk,” he said. “It was really special.”

In those days, the town had around 60 or 70 kids, according to his memory, and the bus had two stops:

“One at this store and the other at a store down the street,” he said.

Bymum Front Porch was originally the general store for the small mill town of Bynum, NC.
Bymum Front Porch was originally the general store for the small mill town of Bynum, NC.

The highway went right through Bynum, bringing plenty of visitors and money to the town. However, when a bypass was built around the little mill town in the 1950s, the town began to struggle. It was the beginning of the end.

Soon, locals began going to nearby towns to shop. Eventually, stores began closing down and even the post office decided there weren’t enough residents to stay in town. Bynum lost its zip code and became incorporated.

The mill stopped running in the 1980s, and a fire destroyed it a few decades later.

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But despite the setbacks, the people of Bymum refused to let their little town’s history just fade away. Bynum was a vibrant community — and would fight to stay that way.

Folks still gather on the front porch of the Bynum General Store in summer to chat and share stories, just like the old days.
Folks still gather on the front porch of the Bynum General Store in summer to chat and share stories, just like the old days.

Keeping Bynum’s history alive

Many waterways across North Carolina are dotted with overgrown stone foundations of mills and surrounding villages that washed away, burned down or were otherwise lost to time. Some communities became ghost towns; others were swallowed by the development of rapidly-growing cities nearby. In the mountains, the ghost of an old mill town provides a glimpse of what can happen when history is lost. Not far away, the community of Merry Oaks – whose general store is abandoned, but for sale – is under pressure by large nearby developments.

Bynum Front Porch now holds a popular summer music series each Friday night.
Bynum Front Porch now holds a popular summer music series each Friday night.

Instead of letting the tide of history wash Bynum away, Ron Hatley, chair of the board for Bynum Front Porch, wants to ensure Bynum’s history is preserved.

“It’s a constant struggle,” he said.

There are efforts in place to preserve the old water tower, as well Bynum Bridge – an abandoned bridge closed to vehicle traffic that currently serves as a popular walking path for locals, as well as a ‘freedom of expression’ canvas for painters. Colorful and vibrant, the bridge provides sweeping views of the Haw River. Every Halloween, hundreds of people come from around the region to see the bridge lined with glowing, carved pumpkins.

Bynum Front Porch now holds a popular summer music series each Friday night.
Bynum Front Porch now holds a popular summer music series each Friday night.

“One of the things we’re doing is an SOS, Save our Store. The Bynum Front Porch building is over a creek, and it’s 90 years old,” he said. “We’re trying to raise money to shore up the foundation. Back then, they just laid down some rocks and built right on top!”

Just as it always has, Bynum Front Porch serves as the beating heart of the community. It may no longer sell groceries, but it you can still trade a story or two and keep those old NC memories alive.

“It’s stayed open as a community center,” said Hatley. “Summer music, storytelling, yoga, morning coffee, scout troop meetings, gatherings for local organizations and leaders.”

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Bynum Front Porch now holds a popular summer music series each Friday night.
Bynum Front Porch now holds a popular summer music series each Friday night.

Every Friday in summer, Bynum Front Porch hosts a summer music series in the grassy lawn beside the store. Then, starting in September, guests can come sit and listen to a storyteller at the old country store – just like kids listening to the older folks swap tales on the front porch.



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North Carolina senators, congressman concerned about Fort Liberty training and anti-abortion advocates – WWAYTV3

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North Carolina senators, congressman concerned about Fort Liberty training and anti-abortion advocates – WWAYTV3


The new Fort Liberty sign is displayed outside the base on Friday, June 2, 2023 in Fort Liberty, N.C. (AP Photo/Karl B DeBlaker)

FAYETTEVILLE, NC (WWAY) — A number of senators and congressmen, including Rep. David Rouzer and Sens. Ted Budd and Thom Tillis, are concerned about military training at Fort Liberty.

In the letter, the senators and congressmen claim an anti-terrorism training conducted at Fort Liberty depicted anti-abortion advocates as terrorists.

The letter claims the anti-terrorism slide was briefed to a group of soldiers as recently as Wednesday, July 10.

A statement released by Fort Liberty that these slides were not vetted by appropriate approval authorities.

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The full text of the letter is reproduced below:

We write regarding social media reports that anti-terrorism training conducted at Ft. Liberty, North Carolina depicts Pro-Life Americans as terrorists.  Specifically, the slides identify National Right to Life, “Choose Life” license plate holders, and anyone who opposes the Supreme Court’s rightfully overturned decision in Roe v. Wade, which was rightfully overturned by the Supreme Court, as members of terrorist groups.  Smearing Pro-Life Americans is despicable and emblematic of the ongoing politicization of the military under the Biden-Harris administration.

The American public expects the Department of Defense and its personnel to defend the homeland from actual terrorists, not Americans who seek protections for children in the womb. Labeling Pro-Life organizations as threats challenges servicemembers’ moral obligation to defend and protect even the smallest among us. In fact, around half of all Americans identify as Pro-Life.  It is no wonder that the Army is struggling to recruit young men and women to join its ranks when it appears the service attacks their values and promotes a woke agenda rather than improving readiness and lethality.

While Ft. Liberty’s statement asserts that the slides “do not reflect the views of the … U.S. Army or the Department of Defense”, the American people are rightfully concerned that training of this kind is being disseminated in the first place and possibly at other military installations. The American people deserve to be assured that these slides truly do not reflect the Army’s views, that a full investigation will be conducted, and that any offending employees will be properly held accountable. Finally, we must be assured that similar materials are not being utilized at other installations across the Army. 

Therefore, we request responses to the following questions no later than July 29, 2024: 

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  • Is it official Army policy to identify Pro-Life Americans and Pro-Life Organizations as “terrorist groups”?
  • How long have these slides been briefed to soldiers and how many soldiers have been briefed with these slides? 
  • What is the current process by which the Army reviews anti-terrorism training materials disseminated on Army bases? 
  • Who are the appropriate approval authorities charged with vetting training materials disseminated to soldiers across the Army?
  • What action is the Army taking to investigate the distribution of training materials depicting Pro-Life Americans as terrorists? 
  • What statutes or Army regulations were potentially violated and what action is the Army taking with regard to any offending employee? 
  • Will you commit to an installation-by-installation review to ensure that these or similar materials are not being disseminated elsewhere and that Army anti-terrorism training aligns with DoD anti-terrorism standard guidance and training? 
  • Will you commit, in writing, that these slides will no longer be used and all future training materials reviewed will align with current DoD anti-terrorism guidance?  

We look forward to your prompt attention and response.





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US North Carolina withdraws out-of-state sales tax transaction threshold – vatcalc.com

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US North Carolina withdraws out-of-state sales tax transaction threshold – vatcalc.com


200-transaction per annum threshold removed; $100k threshold remains

The US state of North Carolina joins most other US states in withdrawing its transaction threshold for non-resident sellers. This had been 200 or more sales per annum, and applied to out-of-state – sellers without a presence or nexus in the state.

This means the obligation to register for sales tax collections only applies for remote sellers with sales over $100,000 per annum.

The change applies from 1 July 2024.

The base state sales tax rate in North Carolina is 4.75%.

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US Sales Tax rates and selling thresholds


State

State sales tax rate

Remote seller annual thresholds

Digital services taxable?

$ threshold

Transactions threshold

Alabama

4.0%

1 Oct 2018

$250,000

Yes

Alaska

0%


n/a

No state-wide tax

Arizona

5.6%

1 Oct 2019

$100,000


Yes

Arkansas

6.5%

1 July 2019

$100,000

200 transactions

Yes

California

6.0%

1 April 2019

$500,000


No

Colorado

2.9%

1 Dec 2018

$100,000


Yes

Connecticut

6.35%

1 Dec 2018

$100,000

200 transactions

Yes

Delaware

0.0%


n/a

No state sales tax

Florida

6.0%

1 July 2021

$100,000


No

Communications Tax. E-books exempt

Georgia

4.0%

1 Jan 2019

$100,000

200 transactions

No

Hawaii

4.0%

1 July 2018

$100,000

200 transactions

Yes

General Excise Tax

Idaho

6.0%

1 June 2019

$100,000

Yes

Software exempt

Illinois

6.25%

1 Oct 2018

$100,000

200 transactions

No

Indiana

7.0%

1 Oct 2018

$100,000

– (since Jan 2024)

Yes

Iowa

6.0%

1 Jan 2019

$100,000


Yes

Kansas

6.5%

1 July 2021

$100,000


No

Kentucky

6.0%

1 Oct 2018

$100,000

200 transactions

Yes

Louisiana

4.45%

1 July 2020

$100,000

– (since Aug 2023)

Yes

Maine

5.5%

1 July 2018

$100,000

– (since 2022)

Yes

Maryland

6.0%

1 Oct 2018

$100,000

200 transactions

Yes

Massachusetts

5.6%

1 Oct 2018

$100,000

No

Michigan

6.0%

30 Sep 2018

$100,000

200 transactions

No

Minnesota

6.875%

1 Oct 2018

$100,000

200 transactions

Yes

Mississippi

7.0%

1 Sep 2018

$250,000


Yes

Missouri

4.225%

1 Jan 2023

$100,000


No

Montana

0.0%


n/a

No state sales tax

Nebraska

5.5%

1 April 2019

$100,000

200 transactions

Yes

Nevada

4.6%

1 Oct 2018

$100,000

200 transactions

No

New Hampshire

0.0%


n/a

New Jersey

6.625%

1 Nov 2018

$100,000

200 transactions

Yes

New Mexico

5.0%

1 July 2019

$100,000


Yes

New York

4.0%

21 July 2018

$500,000

100 transactions

No

North Carolina

4.75%

1 Nov 2018

$100,000

– (since 2024)

Yes

North Dakota

5.0%

1 Oct 2018

$100,000


No

Ohio

5.75%

1 Aug 2019

$100,000

200 transactions

Yes

Oklahoma

4.5%

1 Nov 2019

$100,000


No

Oregon

0.0%


n/a

No state sales tax

Pennsylvania

6.0%

1 July 2019

$100,000

Yes

Puerto Rico

10.5%

1 Jan 2021

$100,000

200 transactions

Yes

Rhode Island

7.0%

1 July 2019

$100,000

200 transactions

Yes

South Carolina

6.0%

1 Nov 2018

$100,000


No

South Dakota

4.5%

1 Nov 2018

$100,000

– (since Jul 2023)

Yes

Tennessee

7.0%

1 July 2019

$100,000


Yes

Texas

6.25%

1 Oct 2019

$500,000


Yes

Only if physcial equivilaent is taxable (e.g. books)

Utah

4.7%

1 Jan 2019

$100,000

200 transactions

Yes

Vermont

6.0%

1 July 2018

$100,000

200 transactions

Yes

Virginia

4.3%

1 July 2019

$100,000

200 transactions

Yes

Washington

6.5%

1 Oct 2018

$100,000


Yes

Washington, DC

6.0%

1 Jan 2019

$100,000

200 transactions

Yes

West Virginia

6.0%

1 Jan 2019

$100,000

200 transactions

Yes

Streaming services only

Wisconsin

5.0%

1 Oct 2018

$100,000

– (since 2021)

Yes

Wyoming

4.0%

1 Feb 2019

$100,000

– (since 2024)

Yes

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