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Louisiana's first wind turbine arrives at Avondale Global Gateway

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Louisiana's first wind turbine arrives at Avondale Global Gateway


Louisiana’s first wind turbine and its components have arrived at Avondale Global Gateway after a transatlantic journey from Ireland. Gulf Wind Technology (GWT), headquartered at Avondale Global Gateway in Jefferson Parish, is now preparing the onshore turbine for installation at the Port Fourchon Coastal Wetlands Park, with initial deployment and testing slated to begin late this year.

“This first turbine will demonstrate all the necessary elements for deploying wind energy projects in the Gulf, marking a crucial step toward realising the full technical and economic potential for offshore wind,” said James Martin, Gulf Wind Technology CEO. “It’s essentially a prototype to provide us research-oriented results that we can build upon and demonstrate the potential supply chain available in Louisiana, starting with Avondale Global Gateway and finishing at deployment near Port Fourchon.”

Host was instrumental in ensuring the turbine’s seamless journey from Ireland. Far from being automated, high-level logistics resemble a complex game of Jenga or Tetris, requiring the skill and expertise that Host employees have mastered.

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“The arrival of this wind turbine underscores Avondale Global Gateway’s commitment to innovation,” added Host Chairman and CEO, Adam Anderson. “Avondale is a prime location for companies like Gulf Wind Technology, and we are proud that they call Avondale Global Gateway home. Together, we will continue to increase economic stability and energy development in Jefferson Parish, Southeast Louisiana, and beyond.”

The transport of this turbine tested Louisiana’s pre-built infrastructure that could easily become part of the offshore wind supply chain. According to a recent report, more than 450 local companies, including Host and Avondale Global Gateway, are ready to support offshore wind in the Gulf of Mexico.

In addition to importing large offshore wind components, Avondale Global Gate-way’s modernised enhancements can offer storage, sub-assembly, and on-site manufacturing and fabrication before loading turbine components onto barges for installation in the Gulf. Avondale Global Gateway’s all-encompassing value and proximity to the Gulf’s experienced workforce make it well-positioned to serve as a logistics and supply chain hub for future offshore wind opportunities.

“Thanks to our extensive global network, we were able to support Gulf Wind Technology’s transport of this turbine as efficiently and cost-effectively as possible,” commented Amanda England, Vice President and General Manager of Avondale Terminal Services, a subsidiary of Host. “Not only do we have the vast acreage to support storing equipment of this size, but we provide the logistical solutions and expertise to ensure it arrives at Avondale on time and in proper condition.”

Gulf Wind Technology established the country’s most advanced rotor technology innovation centre at Avondale Global Gateway in 2023 to develop wind turbine rotors designed to harness the Gulf of Mexico’s wind energy. This involves developing and demonstrating new approaches tailored to the region’s unique conditions, which include seasonal hurricanes and moderate average wind speeds.

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The Accelerator also houses an offshore wind workforce and training programme, leading the 187-ft test turbine to serve as an educational tool supported by Gulf Wind Technology’s cutting-edge composites lab and 30 000 ft2 technology facility at Avondale Global Gateway. It not only provides a unique platform for upskilling and training regional businesses and workforce but also enables Gulf Wind Technology to collaborate with STEM programmes, universities, and national laboratories to showcase innovative American technologies designed for the Gulf of Mexico.

 

 

For more news and technical articles from the global renewable industry, read the latest issue of Energy Global magazine.

Energy Global’s Summer 2024 issue

The Summer 2024 issue of Energy Global starts with a guest comment from Terrawatt on the streamlining of the permitting process in Italy, before moving on to a regional report from Frost & Sullivan on the energy landscape in Asia Pacific. This issue looks at key topics such as wind installation vessels, offshore wind turbine foundations, weather analysis, solar maintenance, and more!

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Read the article online at: https://www.energyglobal.com/wind/11072024/louisianas-first-wind-turbine-arrives-at-avondale-global-gateway/





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Louisiana

Louisiana sees marginal gain in English LEAP scores, stagnant for math and science scores

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Louisiana sees marginal gain in English LEAP scores, stagnant for math and science scores


NEW ORLEANS (WVUE) – School leaders have touted the latest batch of newly released LEAP scores, while advocates said there is still much work to be done.

Louisiana saw minor improvements in student English test scores in 2024, while scores for math and science mostly stayed the same.

For grades 3-8, about 43 percent of students statewide achieved “mastery” in the English language arts test, a marginal improvement year-over-year. For the same grade levels, about 31 percent of students statewide achieved mastery in the math test, while about 28.5 percent of students achieved mastery in the science test.

“Mastery” is the state standard for proficiency.

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The return to nearly pre-pandemic English scores was noteworthy for education leaders, who pointed to efforts to increase literacy among younger populations.

“Following consecutive years of improvement, these latest scores show students holding steady,” said Louisiana State Superintendent of Education Dr. Cade Brumley. “With a need to see increased outcomes, however, these numbers substantiate our recent aggressive efforts to simply let teachers teach, provide students with high-dosage tutoring, refresh our school accountability model, and expand options for students to access high-quality schools.”

The 2024 LEAP scores can be found here.

The Coronavirus pandemic was a major disrupter for school systems nationwide, with school leaders acknowledging recovery is still a work in progress.

“The latest LEAP data released today is encouraging, with overall performance holding steady in line with recent achievement gains. With improvement confirmed in early grades, Louisiana’s emphasis on literacy initiatives and fundamental skills development is beginning to bear fruit,” said Ronnie Morris, President of the Louisiana Board of Elementary and Secondary Education.

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“The availability and accessibility of quality K-12 options is a strength of Louisiana’s system, in which families are empowered to provide the best learning environment for their children.”

About 36 percent of high school students achieved mastery across all subjects (English I, English II, Algebra I, Geometry, U.S. History and Biology).

“People have different learning styles, and we’re teaching to one, which is mostly lecture. The things we already know to do, we need to implement them. We just need to implement best practices,” said Ashana Bigard, a parent of two children in the Orleans Parish education system and a longtime education advocate.

“I know everybody’s going to focus on the one percent growth but considering how much money was poured into the system overall, there definitely needs to be more growth.”

Bigard said the results are not consistent with the amount of state and federal dollars that has been poured into education since the pandemic.

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“We do have a lot of good teachers, we do have a lot of good people trying very hard, but they don’t have the resources,” she said. “We don’t have the small class sizes. We don’t have the books.”

But education researchers note there is a nationwide trend of low-test scores.

“We’re basically back to where we were pre-pandemic, and that’s a lot better than most states can say, so that’s a plus,” said Douglas Harris, chair of the economics department at Tulane University and director of the Education Research Alliance for New Orleans.

“We still see improvement after years of continuous improvement, that’s like unusual. You don’t usually see states improving consistently over time, even to a small degree,” he said. “You’ve got the high absence rate, you’ve got students more stuck on their phones, mental health issues, and I think teaching has become less attractive.”

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Louisiana’s role in NASA’s upcoming moon mission; Baton Rouge painter on the relationship between art and health

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Louisiana’s role in NASA’s upcoming moon mission; Baton Rouge painter on the relationship between art and health


The push to unionize auto plants in the South appears to have lost momentum. This comes after a big loss in May when workers at a Mercedes factory rejected joining the United Auto Workers.

Stephan Bisaha of the Gulf States Newsroom visited the UAW’s campaign in Montgomery, Alabama to learn why it’s so hard to unionize in the Deep South.

Last week, the large core of the Artemis II moon rocket left an assembling facility in Michoud, Louisiana and headed for the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. This is just the latest journey for the rocket, which is set to launch into space late next year.

NASA engineer Chandler Sheuermann tells us about this upcoming mission to the moon, what will make the launch historic, and Louisiana’s role in assembling the rocket.

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This weekend, hundreds of artists from across the country will work on a single project aimed at exploring how artists can help build healthier communities. Their aim is to explore how art can improve the overall health and well-being of communities.

One of the participating locations in this nationwide project is in Baton Rouge. Mike Weary, artist-in-residence at the Arts Council for Greater Baton Rouge tells us about the city’s involvement and what he sees in the relationship between art and health.

Today’s episode of Louisiana Considered was hosted by Adam Vos. Our managing producer is Alana Schreiber; our contributing producers are Matt Bloom and Adam Vos; we receive production and technical support from Garrett Pittman and our assistant producer, Aubry Procell.

You can listen to Louisiana Considered Monday through Friday at noon  and 7:00 p.m. It’s available on Spotify, Google Play, and wherever you get your podcasts. 

Louisiana Considered wants to hear from you! Please fill out our pitch line to let us know what kinds of story ideas you have for our show. And while you’re at it, fill out our listener survey! We want to keep bringing you the kinds of conversations you’d like to listen to.

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Louisiana Considered is made possible with support from our listeners. Thank you!





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Louisiana Businessman to Pay $1.3M Fine for Neglecting Elderly Residents During Ida

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Louisiana Businessman to Pay .3M Fine for Neglecting Elderly Residents During Ida


A Louisiana businessman who sent more than 800 elderly residents from his seven nursing homes to ride out Hurricane Ida in a crowded, ill-equipped warehouse pleaded no contest to 15 criminal counts Monday and was sentenced to three years of probation.

Bob Dean Jr. also must pay more than $358,000 in restitution to the state health department and more than $1 million as a monetary penalty, but state Attorney General Liz Murrill expressed frustration in a news release that Dean didn’t get any prison time.

“We asked specifically that he be sentenced to a minimum of 5 years in prison, and not be given only probation. I respect our judicial system and that the judge has the ultimate discretion over the appropriate sentence, but I remain of the opinion that Dean should be serving prison time,” her statement said.

Dean, 70, owned seven nursing homes in New Orleans and southeast Louisiana. As Ida approached, Dean moved hundreds of residents into a building in the town of Independence, roughly 70 miles (110 kilometers) northwest of New Orleans.

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Authorities said conditions at the warehouse deteriorated rapidly after the powerful storm hit on Aug. 29, 2021. They found ill and elderly bedridden people on mattresses on the wet floor, some crying for help, some lying in their own waste. Civil suits against Dean’s corporation said the ceiling leaked and toilets overflowed at the sweltering warehouse, and there was too little food and water.

Within days after the storm hit, the state reported the deaths of seven of the evacuees, five of them classified as storm-related.

By the time Dean was arrested on state charges in June 2022, he had lost state licenses and federal funding for his nursing homes.

According to Murrill, Dean pleaded no contest to eight counts of cruelty to the infirmed, two counts of obstruction of justice and five counts of Medicaid fraud. Judge Brian Abels sentenced Dean to a total of 20 years in prison, but deferred the sentences in favor of three years of probation. The plea was entered in Tangipahoa, north of New Orleans.

Defendants who plead no contest do not admit guilt but elect not to defend against the charges. They are then subject to being convicted and punished as if there had been a guilty plea.

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