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Richards Layton Promotes 6 Attorneys In Delaware – Law360 Pulse

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Richards Layton Promotes 6 Attorneys In Delaware – Law360 Pulse


The Delaware-based Richards Layton & Finger PA recently announced that three attorneys were elected to serve as directors of the firm and three others were promoted to counsel….

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Delaware

Delaware is most jealous state in the United States. Here’s why.

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Delaware is most jealous state in the United States. Here’s why.


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If familiarity breeds contempt, that might explain why Delaware ranked first as the most jealous state in the Inited States.

A national survey of 2,000 Americans revealed a wide range of triggers for jealousy. It found jealousy is not limited to personal connections but also extends to the workplace, especially in Delaware.

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Conducted by DatingNews.com, the survey delved into questions related to relationships, careers and finances. The findings revealed a significant number of Americans experience jealousy but for different aspects of their lives. In terms of relationships, the survey showed the majority of respondents feel envious of their partner’s friends. Specifically, 60% reported feeling jealous of friends who match their partner’s preferred gender. However, friends of any gender can be a source of tension: 40% of those surveyed admitted to feeling jealous when their partner spends time with friends instead of them.

In one distinctive turn, the main cause of jealousy in The First State is work-related.

Delaware tops states for jealousy

In DatingNews.com rank of the most jealous states, here are the top five and the primary reasons for jealous-inducing feelings:

1. Delaware

Delaware tops the list with a jealousy score of 45.2 out of 60. Survey respondents report higher levels of jealousy than other states, particularly in the workplace. Fifty-seven percent of respondents feel jealous when coworkers get promoted, and 51% are envious of their coworkers’ salaries.

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2. Oklahoma

Oklahomans admitting to feeling jealous when their partners like models’ pictures on social media helped push Oklahoma’s score of 43.9, placing it second in the survey.

3. Rhode Island

The smallest state, Rhode Island, ecures the third spot with a jealousy score of 40.2. Its strong community bonds may contribute to heightened awareness of each other’s achievements, with 62% expressing envy towards their peers’ salaries.

4. Tennessee

Tennessee ranks fourth with a score of 39.3, where 37% have felt compelled to ask their partners to limit interactions with a friend due to jealousy.

5. Indiana

Indiana concludes the top five with a jealousy score of 36.9. While many Hoosiers celebrate their partners’ accomplishments, 34% acknowledge feeling a twinge of envy.

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EXPANDING OPPORTUNITIES: Delaware’s DBE pilot at Hodgson offers potential labor boost to construction industry

Not just jealousy, but envy too

Jealousy involves the fear of losing something or someone important, often seen in romantic or close relationships. These feelings can “undermine relationships and friendships by making a person feel inadequate or insecure,” said Amber Brooks, Editor-in-Chief for DatingNews.com. “Whether it’s wealth, love, or Chris Evans’ relationship status, we all have dreams for ourselves, and it can be hard to see someone seemingly living your dream.”

Envy, on the other hand, arises when we desire something someone else possesses, like wealth, status or achievements. Despite these distinctions, the feelings often intertwine in complex ways. The DatingNews.com survey results found other people’s success triggered jealousy and envy:

  • 54% envy their peers’ salaries
  • Nearly 40% said they feel jealous of their peers’ jobs
  • 45% feel jealous when their coworkers get promotions
  • 57% are jealous of their peer’s wealth or possessions

ANOTHER TOP FIVE: Does your home reflect on one Delaware’s top 5 home décor styles?

What are people most jealous of?

Here is what survey participants said was the one thing they were most jealous of: 

  • People who can retire
  • People who own homes
  • Anyone richer than me
  • The girl engaged to Chris Evans
  • My best friend
  • Cats

Ohio ranks as the least envious state, with Nevada, South Carolina, Connecticut and Maryland following closely behind as the top five least jealous states. Due to their smaller populations, there was insufficient data from Alaska, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Vermont, and Wyoming to be included in the survey results.

You can contact Anitra Johnson at ajohnson@delawareonline.com.

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Delaware

Delaware Historical Society: ‘America’s 250th: For all, for once’

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Delaware Historical Society: ‘America’s 250th: For all, for once’


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Learning from our history has never been more important than it is today. The Delaware Historical Society promotes and amplifies relevant and inclusive histories that inspire deep engagement with the entirety of our past. Viewing contemporary issues through the lens of history reveals complexities, reminds us of important lessons, and helps us explore different perspectives resulting in greater capacity for compassion and understanding.

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As we approach the 250th anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of Independence, it is important that we draw on new interpretations and new tools to make interconnected stories that comprise the founding of our nation more relevant and personally meaningful to a broader and more diverse audience.

The Delaware Historical Society was founded in 1864, primarily as the repository for historic materials and documents of wealthy and influential citizens of Delaware and the surrounding region. A lot has changed since then; along with the study of well-known Delaware historical figures and events, we have a heightened focus on learning and sharing the stories of those individuals and groups whose voices were (or continue to be) seldom heard or muted at different points in history. 

We address Delaware’s underrepresentation and misrepresentation of marginalized communities with diligence and care, eagerly exploring the histories of everyday Delawareans and pioneering innovative ways to advance important conversations among members of our many intersecting communities.

We partner with learning communities, families, other cultural institutions, scholars and artists to coauthor meaning and deepen our collective understanding of the many circumstances, world views and events that have shaped the First State. Whether it is a new, student-led walking tour highlighting the lives and residences of Black families and neighbors from the 19th to early 20th centuries in Old New Castle; a hands-on exploration of the medicinal plants of the Lenape; a community-curated window display celebrating the Lunar New Year; an educational seminar about LGBTQ+ histories and experiences; or a book talk celebrating Delawareans’ service in the WWII era and Wilmington’s designation as a WWII Heritage City; we are working hard to respond to community interests, needs and requests with the understanding that service to all learners is our priority.

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In the 160 years since our founding, DHS has acquired nine historic buildings related to Delaware’s past and an extraordinary collection of more than 3 million objects, books, documents, photographs, and maps. We are the only private nonprofit organization with the mission to serve as the statewide organization exploring, preserving, promoting and sharing Delaware history, heritage, and culture to educate, inspire, and empower people and communities.

DHS’ Jane and Littleton Mitchell Center for African American Heritage offers an expansive exploration of the African American experience in Delaware from 1639 to the present. Through artifacts, oral history interviews, music, and art, it sheds light on diverse perspectives related to African Americans’ struggle for freedom and dignity. The center’s permanent exhibition,” “Journey to Freedomdelves into Delaware’s African American history, covering topics such as faith, placemaking, equality, selfhood, and resistance to slavery. 

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The impact and relevance of DHS reaches far beyond the walls of our historically significant museums and facilities. Teachers and educators around the state and across the country regularly access and share our free, downloadable educational resources covering various topics tying Delaware to national and international histories. Others connect with us by engaging their students as contestants or serving as judges for the National History Day contests we host each spring.

Through discovering new evidence or inviting new perspectives on the facts as we know them, we are growing into an institution whose work is a true reflection of the many ideas and ideals that comprise Delaware history.

At DHS, we tell Delaware’s unique and often surprising stories like no other organization can or does. We approach the commemoration of the Semiquincentennial with a firm commitment to examine what terms like liberty, freedom, patriotism, and loyalty mean to Delawareans, and how the definition of “we the people” has evolved.

Keeping music playing: Art school closings underscore need for community support, engagement for young performers

Blues prodigy in Wilmington: Blues star who shreds like Freddy Krueger to play Delaware

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As we join together as a state to commemorate the country’s 250th anniversary, I invite you to connect with DHS and our wide range of programming, resources and events.

Visit the Delaware History Museum, the Mitchell Center for African American Heritage, and the Read House & Gardens; visit historic Old Town Hall as you consider rental venues for a special event; or get answers to your Delaware history questions at our Research Library.  

Your engagement with DHS and your unique voice and perspective are invaluable as we continue to learn from our history and offer new experiences in the spaces we steward.

Ivan Henderson is executive director of the Delaware Historical Society.

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Café owner in Rehoboth Beach, Delaware shares thoughts about what the Biden’s mean to the communi

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Café owner in Rehoboth Beach, Delaware shares thoughts about what the Biden’s mean to the communi


Café owner in Rehoboth Beach, Delaware shares thoughts about what the Biden’s mean to the communi – CBS Philadelphia

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While Trump is in Michigan, speculation continues to build over whether President Biden will remain in the race. He is still isolated in Delaware this Saturday, as he recovers from COVID.
Josh Sanders reports in Rehoboth Beach and talked to a café owner of one the Biden’s favorite spots while in town.

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