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Nevada vs. San Jose State: Sportsbook promo codes, odds, spread, over/under – February 23

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Nevada vs. San Jose State: Sportsbook promo codes, odds, spread, over/under – February 23


The Nevada Wolf Pack (21-6, 8-5 MWC) battle the San Jose State Spartans (9-18, 2-12 MWC) in a matchup of MWC teams at 10:00 PM ET on Friday. The game airs on Fox Sports 1.

See odds, spreads, over/unders and more from multiple sportsbooks in this article for the Nevada vs. San Jose State matchup.

Nevada vs. San Jose State Game Info

  • When: Friday, February 23, 2024 at 10:00 PM ET
  • Where: Provident Credit Union Event Center in San Jose, California
  • How to Watch on TV: Fox Sports 1

Catch college basketball action all season long on Fubo!

Sportsbook Promo Codes

Nevada vs. San Jose State Odds, Spread, Over/Under

Take a look at the odds, spread and over/under for this matchup listed at multiple sportsbooks.

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Nevada vs. San Jose State Betting Trends

  • Nevada has covered 17 times in 27 matchups with a spread this season.
  • In the Wolf Pack’s 27 games this season, the combined scoring has gone over the point total 10 times.
  • San Jose State has compiled a 10-17-0 record against the spread this season.
  • So far this season, 18 out of the Spartans’ 27 games with an over/under have hit the over.

Nevada Futures Odds

  • Odds to win the national championship: +14000
  • Oddsmakers rate Nevada much higher (38th in the country) than the computer rankings do (51st).
  • The Wolf Pack’s national championship odds have improved from +20000 at the start of the season to +14000, the 39th-biggest change among all teams.
  • Nevada has a 0.7% chance of winning the national championship, based on its moneyline odds.

Check out all the futures bets available at BetMGM!

Not all offers available in all states, please visit BetMGM for the latest promotions for your area. Must be 21+ to gamble, please wager responsibly. If you or someone you know has a gambling problem, contact 1-800-GAMBLER.

© 2023 Data Skrive. All rights reserved.



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Fury erupts in Las Vegas community as residents push back against massive Mormon temple that would stand 216-feet high and tower over their quiet streets

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Fury erupts in Las Vegas community as residents push back against massive Mormon temple that would stand 216-feet high and tower over their quiet streets


Angry residents in a Nevada town are doing everything they can to stop the Mormon church from erecting a 216-foot temple in their neighborhood.

Although residents in the Lone Mountain neighborhood of Las Vegas insist that their frustration doesn’t stem from any issue with the Mormon religion, they are nevertheless opposed to the temple’s construction. 

The Lone Mountain townsfolk fear that the proposed 87,000-square-foot temple will disrupt their rural lifestyle and lead to further development.  In particular, they are concerned with the temple’s planned height- 216 feet- which will dwarf the rest of the buildings in the area.

‘It’s going to stick out like a sore thumb in the middle of a rural setting,’ resident Brinton Marsden told 8news.

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Residents of Lone Mountain, a small and sleepy community in Las Vegas, are up in arms about the Mormon church’s plans to construct an enormous temple in their neighborhood, pictured: a mock-up of the proposed temple

In Lone Mountain, homes are required to stand no higher than two stories. The 216-foot temple would dwarf all buildings in the area. In order to illustrate just how much taller the temple would be, some residents floated a balloon 216 feet high in the air on Saturday

In Lone Mountain, homes are required to stand no higher than two stories. The 216-foot temple would dwarf all buildings in the area. In order to illustrate just how much taller the temple would be, some residents floated a balloon 216 feet high in the air on Saturday

In late March, 12 locals and members of the Northwest Rural Preservation Association, an organization that aims to preserve the rich rural culture in the Lone Mountain area, expressed their anxiety about the project.

Marsden, a member and long-time inhabitant of the area, said the large building would be lit up ’24/7′ over their quiet town.

Marsden also cited the Interlocal Agreement between the City of Las Vegas and Clark County, a document meant to protect the community from more populous urban planning.

‘For instance, no home can be built on less than a half-acre,’ he said.

‘It has to be a single-family home no taller than two stories.’ 

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The organization’s treasurer, Erin DeLoe, expressed a fear the area’s pleasant and serene dark skies would vanish once the temple, with all its bright lights, was constructed.

About 15 other members of the community joined the resident when he launched the balloon

About 15 other members of the community joined the resident when he launched the balloon 

Brinton Marsden (pictured), a longtime member of the community, said the temple was 'going to stick out like a sore thumb in the middle of a rural setting'

Brinton Marsden (pictured), a longtime member of the community, said the temple was ‘going to stick out like a sore thumb in the middle of a rural setting’

Northwest Rural Preservation Association treasurer Erin DeLoe (pictured) said: 'We have no streetlights, no curbs, no gutters, and no sidewalks, and that's what we like'

Northwest Rural Preservation Association treasurer Erin DeLoe (pictured) said: ‘We have no streetlights, no curbs, no gutters, and no sidewalks, and that’s what we like’

‘We have no streetlights, no curbs, no gutters, and no sidewalks, and that’s what we like,’ DeLoe said. ‘This structure will be as tall as the Durango Casino.’

Both Marsden and DeLoe were adamant their objection to the temple had nothing to do with the Mormon faith.

‘If the Catholic Church wanted to build a basilica across the street, I’d be against that too,’ Marsden said. ‘This is not a religious thing at all.’ 

DeLoe added: ‘I value their faith, and what they have taught their people.’

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‘I don’t want this to be taken as an affront to their beliefs because that’s not it at all, it’s the building.’

This past Saturday, residents in Lone Mountain took action to illustrate the proposed height of the new Mormon temple.

An aggrieved local purchased seven-foot helium balloon, which they then floated above the Lone Mountain area at 216 feet – the proposed height of the temple.

The balloon, which could withstand 15mph, was affixed to two cinderblocks to anchor it. Around 15 community members walked over to the balloon’s launch site and stood in solidarity.

Matt Hackley, a Lone Mountain resident, said: ‘We as the neighbors are trying to battle against this project.’

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‘It does not fit the neighborhood.’

Like Brinton Marsden, Hackley also invoked the Interlocal Agreement. 

‘It does not fit along within the guidelines of what the rest of the neighborhood has to follow.’ 

‘Our homes are asked to be 35 feet maximum, and the LDS community is asking for their temple to be 216 feet.’

Although the Interlocal Agreement could indeed tie up future construction on the temple, a recent report conducted by the City of Las Vegas concluded that the Mormon temple would not be in violation – as the agreement does not address religious or government facilities. 

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One local resident complained that their houses were required to be under 35 feet in height, while the proposed temple would be 216 feet tall

One local resident complained that their houses were required to be under 35 feet in height, while the proposed temple would be 216 feet tall

The lot (pictured) on which the Mormon church hopes to build encompasses some 20 acres- enough to contain the proposed 87,000-square-foot bulk of the temple

The lot (pictured) on which the Mormon church hopes to build encompasses some 20 acres- enough to contain the proposed 87,000-square-foot bulk of the temple

Bud Stoddard, stake president of the Las Vegas Lone Mountain Stake of the Mormon church, told 8news that he believed that the 3,000 members he represents approve of the temple.

Stoddard explained he was aware of the community’s concerns, but the power to alter the temple’s height was not vested in him.

The lot the Mormon church hopes to build on amounts to 20 acres.  

The massive temple would stand between North Grand Canyon Drive and Tee Pee Lane. The Lone Mountain temple would be the second Mormon temple in Las Vegas and the fourth in the state of Nevada.



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Crush of lawsuits over voting in multiple states, including Nevada, creates a shadow war for the 2024 election

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Crush of lawsuits over voting in multiple states, including Nevada, creates a shadow war for the 2024 election


CHICAGO (AP) — As President Joe Biden and Donald Trump step up their campaigning in swing states, a quieter battle is taking place in the shadows of their White House rematch.

The Republican National Committee, newly reconstituted under Trump, has filed election-related lawsuits in nearly half the states. Recent lawsuits over voter roll maintenance in Michigan and Nevada are part of a larger strategy targeting various aspects of voting and election administration.

It’s not a new strategy. But with recent internal changes at the RNC and added pressure from the former president, the legal maneuvering is expected to play an increasingly significant role for the party as Election Day in November approaches. The lawsuits are useful for campaign messaging, fundraising and raising doubts about the validity of the election.

Danielle Alvarez, a senior adviser to the RNC and the Trump campaign, said the lawsuits were one of the organization’s main priorities this year.

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“This is something that’s very important to President Trump,” she said. “He has said that this is something the RNC should do year-round.”

Democrats and legal experts are warning about how the lawsuits might overwhelm election officials and undermine voter confidence in the the results of the balloting.

The Democratic National Committee has a legal strategy of its own, building “a robust voter protection operation, investing tens of millions of dollars,” to counter the GOP’s efforts that seek to restrict access to the polls, spokesperson Alex Floyd said.

“The RNC is actively deploying an army of lawyers to make it harder for Americans’ ballots to be counted,” he said.

Election litigation soared after the 2020 election as Trump and his allies unsuccessfully challenged his loss to Biden in dozens of lawsuits.

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Experts that year wondered whether the blitz of legal action was an aberration caused by false claims of a stolen election and changes to voting processes due to the COVID-19 pandemic, said Miriam Seifter, attorney with the State Democracy Research Initiative at the University of Wisconsin Law School.

They quickly realized that wasn’t the case as the 2022 midterms also generated a high number of election-related lawsuits. This year is projected to be similar, she said.

“Litigation seems to now be a fixture of each parties’ political and electoral strategies,” Seifter said.

Voter ID rules, mail ballots and voter roll maintenance are among the RNC’s litigation targets. The latest is a lawsuit this month alleging that Michigan has failed to keep its voter rolls up to date.

Maintaining accurate voter rolls by updating voters’ status is routine for election officials, who watch for death notices, changes in motor vehicle records or election mail being repeatedly returned. Michigan also uses ERIC, an interstate data-sharing pact that helps states update voter lists but has been targeted by conspiracy theories.

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Opponents of the lawsuit have said it relies on unsubstantiated, flawed data and runs the risk of purging legitimate voters.

“They’re claiming there’s a problem because one piece of data doesn’t match another piece of data,” said Justin Levitt, a Loyola Law School professor. “But the pieces of data they’re trying to match don’t measure the same thing. It’s like saying, ‘I just looked at the clock and it’s different from the temperature on my thermometer.’”

This is not a new tactic, said Caren Short, director of legal and research for the League of Women Voters, which has filed to intervene in the Michigan lawsuit. She said most previous lawsuits have been from “more fringe groups” rather than directly from the RNC.

“Now seeing a prominent political party attempting to purge people from the rolls, it’s very concerning,” she said.

In the past four years, Michigan’s voter rolls have been targeted in three similar unsuccessful lawsuits. Just days after the Michigan lawsuit was filed, the RNC filed a similar one in Nevada.

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A federal appeals court earlier sided with the RNC in a lawsuit in Pennsylvania questioning whether officials should count improperly dated absentee ballots. A Wisconsin lawsuit is targeting absentee voting procedures and ballot drop boxes. An RNC lawsuit in Arizona is aiming to invalidate or adjust the state’s 200-page elections manual while another in Mississippi seeks to prevent mail ballots from being counted if they are postmarked by Election Day but received days later.

Various other groups have filed similar litigation recently, including a lawsuit against the Maryland State Board of Elections claiming the state’s voting system is not in compliance with federal and state law.

Marly Hornik, CEO of United Sovereign Americans, one of the groups behind the Maryland lawsuit, said more lawsuits are intended in other states this year. On its website, United Sovereign Americans, which Hornik said formed last summer, announced plans to file lawsuits in 23 states.

The GOP and affiliated groups are involved in dozens of other cases with more on the way, RNC officials have said. In this election cycle, the RNC’s legal team has been involved in more than 80 lawsuits in 23 states, said Alvarez, the RNC spokesperson.

She said part of the reason for the flurry of lawsuits was the lifting of a federal consent decree in 2018 that had sharply limited the RNC’s ability to challenge voter verification and other “ballot security.”

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During an interview this month with Fox News, the RNC chairman, Michael Whatley, emphasized the party’s plans to prioritize election-related litigation. He said the RNC is recruiting and training tens of thousands of poll observers and working with thousands of attorneys.

On Friday, the RNC announced plans to train poll watchers, poll workers and lawyers and send out more than 100,000 attorneys and volunteers to monitor vote-counting across battleground states in November.

Prioritizing election litigation also is reflected in recent changes within the RNC since Whatley and Lara Trump, the former president’s daughter-in-law, took control and reshaped the organization with a renewed focus on “election integrity.” The RNC now has “election integrity directors” in 13 states.

Christina Bobb, who has promoted false claims of a stolen 2020 election and was part of a Trump-backed fake elector scheme, was tapped to lead the department.

“One of our biggest changes from last cycle to this cycle was making the election integrity department its own department with its own dedicated budget and focus,” Alvarez said.

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Rick Hasen, an election law expert and professor at the University of California, Los Angeles, said most of the lawsuits are unlikely to win in court but “serve as a basis for fundraising and are trying to keep this issue front and center as a campaign issue.”

Democracy groups and legal experts said the lawsuits could pave the way for false narratives challenging the validity of the 2024 election while consuming time and staff at election offices across the country. Post-election lawsuits also could delay or obstruct certification of the results.

“I worry about these lawsuits that are not designed to clarify the rules but instead to lay the groundwork for false claims that an election their side lost was stolen or rigged,” said David Becker, founder and executive director of the Center for Election Innovation & Research, which advises local election officials nationwide. “We saw this in 2020. We saw it in 2022. And we’re beginning to see the planting of seeds of doubt in the minds of the electorate again in 2024.”

___

Associated Press writer Joey Cappelletti in Lansing, Michigan, contributed to this report.

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___

The Associated Press receives support from several private foundations to enhance its explanatory coverage of elections and democracy. See more about AP’s democracy initiative here. The AP is solely responsible for all content.



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Trump, RNC promise 'aggressive' election interference in battleground states • Nevada Current

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Trump, RNC promise 'aggressive' election interference in battleground states • Nevada Current


Donald Trump and the Republican National Committee on Friday announced a “100,000 person strong” program designed to harass election officials and their employees and discredit democracy in Nevada and a dozen other states.

In a statement announcing its Orwellian named “election integrity program,” the RNC said it is “establishing a robust network of monitoring, and protection against any violation or fraud.”

Neither the RNC, Trump, nor anyone else has ever provided any evidence of fraud that would have altered results of the 2020 election that Trump lost to Joe Biden.

“We will aggressively take them to court,” declared Charlie Spies, the RNC’s lead lawyer in the program. 

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Again? 

More than five dozen lawsuits filed by Trump and Republicans challenged the 2020 election results, including several suits in Nevada. To reiterate, the existence of significant fraud or illegal voting was not found in a single one of those cases.

“The Democrat tricks from 2020 won’t work this time,”  Spies said.

A few weeks after the Trump-instigated January 6 attempt to steal the election, Spies himself acknowledged lies launched by Trump and his allies about the 2020 election are “simply not true.”

The RNC’s announcement issued Friday is loaded with hyperbole and innuendo about “voter fraud,” and a “rigged” election, but refers to no evidence of either. That’s not surprising. To reiterate, the courts and election officials in state after state, including Nevada’s then-Secretary of State, Republican Barbara Cegavske, found no evidence that the 2020 election was “rigged.”

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But the RNC isn’t promising to intimidate election officials and workers in Nevada because of evidence of wrongdoing in 2020. The RNC is launching its effort because Trump controls the RNC, and he told it to.

‘Democrat tricks from 2020’? Do tell.

With Friday’s RNC announcement, the de facto official position of the Republican Party in 2024 is that in 2020, in Nevada and several other states, every election official, including multiple Republican ones, along with thousands of poll workers and election staff in those states, were co-conspirators in an extravagant and sweeping conspiracy to steal the 2020 election from Donald Trump.

Many of the federal judges rejecting suits from Trump and Republicans in 2020 had been appointed by Republican presidents. Several of them had been appointed by Trump. 

Yet for the “Democrat tricks from 2020” to have worked, dozens of state and federal judges would have also had to be in on the conspiracy. 

For the alleged plot – again, the existence of which is now a fundamental premise of the official Republican Party – to succeed, not just judges but thousands, perhaps tens of thousands, of people across the country would have had to have been in on it. It would have had to be an unprecedentedly sophisticated bipartisan conspiracy spanning all branches of local, state and federal government in multiple states.

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And yet to this day, and despite multiple and ongoing efforts to prove election fraud by everyone from Trump’s ever-changing stable of quack lawyers to the RNC to Fox News to the My Pillow guy, not a single one of the thousands and thousands of people who would have had to participate in the “Democrat tricks” have confirmed any Republican allegations of the alleged vast conspiracy.

Because there was no conspiracy. 

There was an election. 

Trump lost.

Whether Trump’s daughter-in-law, Lara Trump, who co-chairs the RNC, or Sigal Chattah, who is Nevada’s Republican Committeewoman, or any of the other RNC’s leaders, members and/or staffers sincerely believe the fantasy of the “stolen” 2020 election – in other words, if they have genuinely been brainwashed into delusion – is irrelevant. The delusion is now official RNC policy. Their job is to act accordingly. And that job, specifically, is “a 100,000 person strong” effort to belittle and discredit democracy.

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To belabor the obvious, the last thing Trump wants to do is protect the integrity of elections. He is dedicated to doing the opposite of that.

He relentlessly attacked the election process in the years leading up to the 2020 election in an attempt to discredit the results even before any votes had been cast, and lied about the process on election night, in an attempt to stop votes from being counted.

After all the votes had been counted he continued to tell lies about the election, and instigated the January 6 insurrection. 

When that failed, he started running for president again. He’s been lying about the 2020 election and, in a repeat of his behavior prior to the 2020 election, trying to discredit the 2024 results in advance.

The RNC’s announcement Friday is not an “election integrity program.” It’s just an extension of Trump’s attacks on democracy and penchant for cheating.

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How ugly will it get in Nevada?

Trump’s adoring flock continues to be mesmerized by his schtick. Pandering to that flock, Republican elected officials and office-seekers, even those who did not deny the 2020 election results, have effectively condoned Trump’s war on democracy by citing “concerns” in some segments of the public about the 2020 election – concerns that were fabricated and spread by Trump.

Those Republican elected officials and office-seekers are implying, with no evidence, that somehow some vague something must have been wrong.

If not election deniers, they are election-denier-adjacent. They are irresponsibly enabling and lending credibility to Trump’s effort to end democracy. Their behavior is despicable, cowardly, and an ongoing threat to the nation and its people.

Nevada Republican Gov. Joe Lombardo is a good example of this (although most of the Nevada press doesn’t seem to care much).

If Lombardo shows the same blithe disregard when the RNC begins intimidating Nevada election workers, filing more nuisance Nevada lawsuits in which it compares apples to orangutans, and spreading lies to undermine his constituents’ faith in the same election system by which he obtained his job, he’ll be enabling and empowering all that as well.

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By looking the other way, Lombardo would also be doing his bit to help Trump nullify the votes of Nevadans in 2024, as Trump tried to do after the 2020 election.

Lara Trump as co-chair of the RNC, Michael McDonald and fellow indicted election deniers in charge of the Republican Party in Nevada, Trump’s cavalcade of weirdo lawyers … given the chuckleheads who will be involved, it’s tempting, maybe even warranted, to speculate that Trump’s lawyers and the teams of people he enlists to harass election officials and undermine democracy in Nevada won’t be any more competent in 2024 than they in were 2020, and equally ineffective at overturning legitimate election results.

But even in failing, their efforts can be pernicious, as evidenced in multiple states, most notably the pain and suffering Trump and his minions cruelly inflicted on Georgia election workers Shaye Moss and Ruby Freeman.

How ugly will it get in Nevada? Especially if Lombardo, Rep. Mark Amodei, and other Nevada Republican elected officials and candidates go along to get along with Trump? We’re about to find out.

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