Connect with us

Massachusetts

Massachusetts From the Lowest to the Highest Elevation

Published

on

Massachusetts From the Lowest to the Highest Elevation


Massachusetts is a small state. At 10,555 square miles, 25.7 percent of which is water, Massachusetts is the seventh-smallest state in the nation. Massachusetts can fit into Alaska, the largest state, 62 times.

As little as it is, Massachusetts seems to have it all. There are oceans, forests, lakes, rivers, islands, mountains and at least two inactive volcanoes that date back hundreds of millions of years.

The Bay State’s highest and lowest elevations are at opposite corners.

The lowest elevation anywhere is sea level. That would be us, here in New Bedford and much of southeastern Massachusetts. New Bedford’s shoreline is the lowest elevation in Massachusetts.

Advertisement

So what about the highest elevation in Massachusetts? That would be Mount Greylock in the northwest corner of the state.

Massachusetts From The Lowest To The Highest Elevation

Barry Richard/Townsquare Media

According to the Massachusetts Department of Parks and Recreation’s Mount Greylock State Reservation website, “At 3,491 feet, Mount Greylock is the highest point in Massachusetts.”

The site says, “On a clear day, you can see as far as 90 miles away.”

Mount Greylock is open from dawn to dusk every day except Thanksgiving and Christmas. There is an auto road from the base to the summit, however “vehicles greater than 22 feet in length are prohibited from traveling on the Mount Greylock Auto Roads and to the summit.”

Advertisement

The distance from New Bedford, the lowest elevation in Massachusetts, and Mount Greylock, the highest, is 134 miles as the crow flies. According to Waze, the drive from New Bedford to Mount Greylock is 188.9 miles and will take about three hours and 12 minutes.

Jonathan the Tortoise Is Older Than These Historic Massachusetts Staples

People come and people go but Jonathan is forever. At least it seems that way. The oldest-living documented land animal, born in 1832, is celebrating 192 spectacular years and shows no signs of stopping. To put his mindblowing age into perspective, here are some Massachusetts mainstays Jonathan predates.

12 Things Invented in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts

A lot of life-changing things have come out of Massachusetts. Here are a few of the Bay State inventions still relevant to our lives today.

Gallery Credit: Gazelle





Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Massachusetts

Massachusetts is the smartest state in the nation – Boston Agent Magazine

Published

on

Massachusetts is the smartest state in the nation – Boston Agent Magazine


A new report has ranked the smartest states across the country, and Massachusetts came out on top.

Education researchers at UTS Online analyzed each of the 50 states across 10 main factors, including average IQ, high school graduation rates, college graduation rates, SAT & ACT scores, NAEP scores, literacy rates, numeracy rates, share of State Value Added for Arts and Culture Production (ACPSA), and the number of colleges per capita.

The Bay State ranked overall No. 1 with an intelligence score of 81.63 

The report found it had the highest average IQ in the nation, at 104.3, plus its students achieved the highest score for both the SAT and ACT exams and came in second in NAEP. 

Advertisement

Home to some of the most prestigious universities in the nation, including M.I.T. and Harvard, Massachusetts also had the highest college graduation rate in the country. 

Additionally, the Bay State ranked fifth for ACPGA, 17th for 2024 high school graduation rates and 29th for number of colleges. 

And it wasn’t the only New England state to make the top of the list.

New Hampshire came in second followed by Minnesota, Vermont and Washington state.

Advertisement



Source link

Continue Reading

Massachusetts

US Marshals nab fugitive in Connecticut, wanted for murder and other crimes in Massachusetts

Published

on

US Marshals nab fugitive in Connecticut, wanted for murder and other crimes in Massachusetts


U.S. Marshals apprehended a Puerto Rican man in Willimantic, Connecticut on Thursday, who was wanted for allegedly shooting and killing a man in Massachusetts in December.

The U.S. Marshal’s Service said 28-year-old Lee George-Maldonado faces multiple charges in Fall River, Massachusetts, including murder, carrying a firearm without a license, attempting to commit a crime, kidnapping with a firearm, and two counts of attempted assault with a firearm. He also faces domestic violence charges in Puerto Rico.

Detectives with the Fall River Police Department investigated the shooting of 44-year-old Juan Castro, who was found dead outside his home on Bank Street on Dec. 23, 2023.

UTAH POLICE OFFICER KILLED BY SEMI-TRUCK, SUSPECT ARRESTED AFTER HOURS-LONG MANHUNT

Advertisement

An image of Lee George-Maldonado, who was wanted in connection to a murder on Dec. 23, 2023, in Massachusetts. (U.S. Marshals Service)

Following the investigation, police obtained a warrant for Maldonado’s arrest on May 17, and requested assistance from the U.S. Marshals Service to locate and take him into custody.

Members of the U.S. Marshals Connecticut Violent Fugitive Task Force tracked Maldonado to a residence in Willimantic, Connecticut, where he was ultimately apprehended with the help of SWAT members from the Willimantic Police Department.

DEADLY FLORIDA CARJACKING: PERSON OF INTEREST ARRESTED, ANOTHER ON THE LOOSE AS PLOT THICKENS

U.S. Marshals badge

The U.S. Marshals have recently been involved in several successful fugitive captures in New England. (File )

Maldonado is currently being held, pending extradition to Massachusetts to face charges against him.

Advertisement

The Connecticut Violent Fugitive Task Force is made up of several agencies, including police departments in Hartford, New Haven, Bridgeport, Norwalk and Waterbury, as well as U.S. Immigrations and Customs Enforcement.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

The task force seeks out and arrests violent fugitives and sexual predators, and since the group’s inception in 1999, they have arrested people wanted for being unregistered sex offenders or on charges of murder, assault, probation and parole violations and more.



Source link

Continue Reading

Massachusetts

Antisemitism education amendment passed in Massachusetts

Published

on

Antisemitism education amendment passed in Massachusetts


SPRINGFIELD, Mass. (WGGB/WSHM) – As the Massachusetts Senate continues to debate their budget bill, an amendment to combat antisemitism passed last night.

We spoke with Senator John Velis, and he told us it was an emotional night in State House as many of his Jewish colleagues shared their experiences with antisemitism. He believes requiring the state to come up with a curriculum to educate students and teachers on the vast history of antisemitism is a step in the right direction. Especially as the number of antisemitic instances are on the rise here in the Commonwealth.

Longmeadow parent Shelley Barron told us, “My involvement was really catalyzed by, there was an incident where there was a swastika found on a whiteboard in Longmeadow High School seen by the child of a friend of mine and by our child, so that was very distressing for many of us here in the Longmeadow and kind of the Lower Valley Jewish community.

Shelley Barron is a parent of a 1st grader at Blueberry Hill Elementary School in Longmeadow. As a Jewish mom raising Jewish children, she told us she’s noticed an uptick in antisemitic biases, especially since October 7th when the Israel-Hamas war officially ignited.

Advertisement

This uptick in hatred here in western Mass is what has led her to become an advocate for educating students and the public on the harm of antisemitism, and now an amendment to the state senate budget introduced by Senator John Velis would require the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education to come up with a curriculum to educate students and teachers on antisemitism both historically and beyond. It passed 40 to 0 on Wednesday night.

Velis explained, “I’ve had a lot of meetings recently. I should say with constituents telling me about their kids, kids eight years old, just young young, young telling me about how their loved one, their child, their grandson, granddaughter is embarrassed to say, sad to say, scared to say that they’re Jewish.”

From vandalism to physical assault and verbal harassment, Senator Velis told us antisemitism in our state has gone up over 100%.

To put that in perspective, only 3 percent of our state’s population is Jewish, meanwhile, that small group of our population is on the receiving end of over  60% of all hate crimes that occur in Massachusetts.

Senator Velis added there are five states with 50% of Jewish hate and antisemitism in the U.S. and Massachusetts is among those five.

Advertisement

These alarming numbers are why the senate is working to lend a hand to our Jewish residents and find the root cause of this severe hatred.

Barron added, “I think it’s actually really important to integrate age appropriate curriculum to create safer schools for all children.”

CEO of the Jewish Federation of Western Mass told us there is a lack of understanding by many administrations and officials on what truly qualifies as an act of antisemitism, and they are noticing a lot of hatred going unreported. Gorenstein feels this amendment could potentially help to target this issue.

“I hope that it will help our schools and communities better recognize and connect the dots when these small, isolated things actually happen that they are part of a bigger picture unfortunately and a framework that we want to be disrupting.”

The budget is being reviewed in the Senate as we speak, and once passed, it will then go to a conference committee to come up with a compromise bill with the house.  Senator Velis is optimistic that this antisemitism education amendment will be included in the final draft. I did reach out to DESE as well as the Massachusetts Teachers Association for comment but haven’t yet heard back.

Advertisement



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending