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It’s a brutally hot summer in D.C., and there’s little sign of relief

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It’s a brutally hot summer in D.C., and there’s little sign of relief


The heat in Washington — which went into overdrive in mid-June — is becoming insufferable.

Tuesday became the fifth day in a row hitting at least 97 degrees and the 22nd day reaching 90 degrees or higher this year. Heat indexes, factoring in oppressive humidity levels, climbed to around 110 — higher than just about anywhere in the United States. The brutal conditions prompted the National Weather Service to upgrade D.C.’s heat advisory to an excessive-heat warning.

Wednesday is forecast to reach the upper 90s again, and heat alerts are in effect for the third-straight day.

The nights, meanwhile, have been sultry. We’ve already posted several instances of lows of 80 degrees or higher this summer after a five-year pause. Before the year 2000, nights this warm were exceptionally rare.

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The hot days and steamy nights add up to the second-hottest start to the summer on record.

While there might be a break in the heat Friday, it won’t last. The hot weather pattern probably resumes over the weekend and intensifies next week.

According to the Climate Shift Index from Climate Central, a science communications firm, human-caused climate change has made the recent heat in the D.C. area twice as probable.

The second-warmest summer on record so far

Using the meteorological definition, summer began June 1. The current average temperature of 80.5 degrees since then trails only 2010’s 80.8 degrees among the hottest years as of this date. Rounding out the top five are 1994 (80.1), 2011 (79.4) and 2012 (78.9).

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Since Jan. 1, this is also the second-warmest year on record to date with an average temperature of 58.7 degrees, trailing only 2012’s 59.3 degrees (that year went on to become the hottest on record). The United States is also having its second-warmest year on record so far.

Since we turned on the heat in mid-June, abnormally hot afternoon highs have been the norm. The average since June 1 of 90 degrees ranks as the third highest on record to date, behind 2010 (90.4) and 1994 (90.6).

The 22 days with highs reaching at least 90 is eight ahead of the norm to date. Typically, it’s not until late July that we’ve seen this many 90 degree days. Last year, as of this date we only had 10 such days.

In addition to all of the 90 degree days, we’ve racked up nine with a high of at least 97 degrees, including the first 100 degree day since 2016. To date, the count is behind only 1991, which had nine, and 2012 at 12.

We’ve now had five days in a row with highs of at least 97 and will probably bring the streak to six days Wednesday — tying for the second longest on record, trailing only the tally of seven in 1953.

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Low temperatures so far this summer rank as the second hottest on record to date. The average low of 71 degrees is only slightly cooler than 2010’s 71.2 degrees — which had the warmest nights to date.

We’ve already logged four nights with lows at or above 80 degrees, with three coming between Saturday and Monday. We’ll probably add another Wednesday, which would bring the total to five. The most lows of 80 or higher on record in a year is seven, last done in 2016.

The current heat wave, which began July 4, will probably end Friday. That’s when clouds and some tropical moisture pulled north by Hurricane Beryl’s remnants will briefly overtake the area, lowering temperatures somewhat (but not humidity). The chance of rain — much-needed because of growing drought conditions — should keep highs below 90, although the forecast could still shift drier and hotter.

Beyond that, highs at or above 90 will probably return for at least the next two weeks. With average highs of 90 until July 27, hot weather is expected. But computer models project that temperatures have a good chance to rise above the norm, well into the 90s to near 100 at times.

Jason Samenow contributed to this report.

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Washington, D.C

The Most Charming Weekend Getaways From Washington, DC

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The Most Charming Weekend Getaways From Washington, DC


Washington, D.C. doesn’t loosen its (metaphorical) tie all too often—this much is true. And although the capital city has made major strides to shed its steak and potatoes reputation in recent years with a booming restaurant scene, new museums and galleries, and an onslaught of boutique hotels, it’s the weekend getaways from DC that are increasingly attracting attention. From plush country inns in rural towns to destination restaurants to wineries working their way up to national recognition, there’s never been a better reason to get out of town. Here’s where to go to escape the District, whether you call DC home or are looking for somewhere to visit that isn’t the National Mall.

Middleburg, Virginia

The Red Fox Inn and Tavern.

Photo: Jodi & Kurt Photography / Courtesy of the Red Fox Inn and Tavern

Middleburg is Washington’s answer to the Cotswolds. While just over an hour from the capital, it could not feel further away—nowhere else nearby does rolling fields, horse farms, old stone buildings, and vineyards quite as well. The picturesque town features a charming main street flush with window shopping and splurge-worthy options, like Crème de la Crème (which sells a curated selection of mostly Italian and French homewares), Middleburg Books (a compact bookstore), Highcliffe Clothier (an upmarket country outfitter), and Knead Wine (which sells wines hand-selected by a master sommelier as well as pizza). There’s also the surprisingly interesting National Sporting Library & Museum, which boasts an on-brand collection of paintings and sculptures of all things equine.

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Middleburg has long been a haven for well-heeled Washingtonians and their weekend homes, with residents including Elizabeth Taylor and the Kennedys, who made Wexford, a 166-acre farm their weekend home during their White House years. (Even after the sale of the Wexford, horse-mad Jackie still made Middleburg a regular destination, staying at the historic Red Fox Inn and Tavern in the center of town.) As charming as the town itself is, the real beauty of Middleburg is its deep countryside dotted with horses, cattle, foxes, and Virginia’s growing wineries—Boxwood, Cana, and Greenhill provide an excellent introduction to the area’s viticulture and make Middleburg one of the most surprising weekend getaways from DC.

The crowning jewel of the area is Goodstone, an inn featuring guest rooms and a handful of well-appointed country homes spread across 256 very private acres of working farmland and open fields. To be a guest at Goodstone—to wander its meadows, swim in its quiet pool, and soak in a hot bath with views of rolling hills—is an experience to savor long after returning home. The excellent French-leaning, farm-to-table restaurant is the ultimate cherry on top.

Washington, Virginia

Image may contain Dining Table Furniture Table Architecture Building Dining Room Indoors Room Lamp Blade and Knife

The Inn at Little Washington.

Photo: Gordon Beall / Courtesy of the Inn at Little Washington



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Unique Angle – Watch Celtic score four goals in Washington DC

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Unique Angle – Watch Celtic score four goals in Washington DC


The Celtic Star is the independent Celtic Supporters site. We’re ‘obsessed with Celtic’ – just like you! The Celtic Star is committed to bringing you the best coverage of Celtic, past, present and future.

Email us at editor@thecelticstar.co.uk

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Washington, D.C

Gray D.C. Saturday seemed a summer landmark

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Gray D.C. Saturday seemed a summer landmark


Not to gloat, lest the scorching spirits of summertime be provoked, but on Saturday the mercury in the District failed for a third successive day to reach 90 degrees.

In a month of many 90-degree readings, and several in the 100s, D.C.’s high temperature on Saturday climbed only to 87 degrees.

That was two degrees cooler than the 89s of Thursday and Friday, and three degrees below the average high for the date of 90.

In a way, that below average reading seemed a special sign of defiance of Washington’s heat at its most formidable.

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Saturday’s 87 came on the 94th anniversary of the date the temperature in Washington reached the fearsome figure of 106 degrees, the highest reading ever recorded in the District.

That 106 degree temperature of July 20 in 1930 had been reached in Washington once before; the first time was on Aug. 6, 1918. Saturday’s 87 was 19 degrees cooler.

By halting its climb at 87 degrees, Saturday’s temperature gave Washington its first string of three successive days in the 80s since the first three days of July.

In another seeming break with this summer’s trends, Saturday also provided the city with a predominantly gray and overcast sky, and even a few raindrops.

Rain has often been sparse in parts of the Washington region this summer, so even the small amount of rain officially measured for the District might loom large.

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As of 5 p.m. the official figure was .02 inch. That amount may be nobody’s downpour. But it might at least signal that the mechanisms that produce rainfall have not been scrapped.

A sprinkling of raindrops fell on the city for a couple of hours at least, moistening pavements, creating concentric ripples in puddles and giving the sensation, perhaps, that it would amount to more than it actually did.

The sensation was enhanced by the thick gray clouds that lumbered across the sky, dark billows that seemed destined to unleash great torrents, but in many places, at least, never quite did.

But the very presence of raindrops may have added a distinctive touch to a day that merited recognition on other grounds. For example, Saturday was 30 days since the June 20 solstice, which started astronomical summer.

As a result, Saturday was almost one third of the way from the solstice to the Sept. 22 autumn equinox.

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Saturday gave signs of slow erosion in the luxurious expanse of daylight for which summer is known. According to the timeanddate website, sunrise in the District on Saturday was still before 6 a.m. — but only a minute before.

On Sunday, as daylight shrinks by ever larger amounts, sunrise will not be until 6 a.m.

Nevertheless it would seem foolhardy at the least not to remain aware that we are far from finished with summer, and it is far from finished with us.



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