Connect with us

Texas

Texas A&M Football's All-Time Results vs. Notre Dame

Published

on

Texas A&M Football's All-Time Results vs. Notre Dame


With the 2024 college football season less than four months away, a slew of kick-off times have been released to the public. The most notable is Texas A&M’s season-opening matchup vs. Notre Dame on Saturday, Aug. 31, which will air on ABC, the new home for SEC Football.

For the next three months, we at Aggies Wire will provide as much content as possible regarding the matchup, which will be the first between both programs since the 2001 season, and returning to Kyle Field to open up the inaugural campaign for Aggies head coach Mike Elko.

For older Aggies and Notre Dame alums, the first meeting between the two schools dates back to New Year’s Day in 1988 in the Cotton Bowl. The Cotton Bowl was a popular bowl game for Texas A&M during the Jackie Sherrill and R.C. Slocum coaching eras, with seven appearances dating back to the mid-1980s. After their first meeting, back-to-back matchups occurred in 2000 and 2001 before the recent drought.

This big-time matchup could dictate both team’s postseason hopes, so what a way to open up the 2024 season for these two squads. Looking back at the matchup history, we analyzed the All-Time results of the five All-Time meetings.

Advertisement

1988 Cotton Bowl Classic — Texas A&M 35, Notre Dame 10

Texas A&M’s 1987 season was a massive success. The team finished the regular season with a 9-2 record, including an impressive 6-1 record in the Southwest conference. For Notre Dame, legendary Lou Holtz finished his second season at 8-4, as Hall of Fame WR Tim Brown would finish his collegiate career with a 35-10 blowout loss to the Aggies.

1993 Cotton Bowl Classic Notre Dame 28, Texas A&M 3

(Photo by Stephen Dunn/Getty Images)

Coming off a perfect 12-0 finish, Texas A&M’s staunch “wrecking crew” defense apparently took a break in the 1993 Cotton Bowl, allowing Notre Dame to run all over the place, including 34 consecutive rushing attempts in the second half.

1994 Cotton Bowl Classic — Notre Dame 24, Texas A&M 21

USA TODAY Sports

Advertisement

A controversial year for Notre Dame, Florida State was rewarded the 1993 National Championship after receiving more votes in the final poll, even though the Irish had defeated the Seminoles earlier in the season. A 10-1 regular finish for the Aggies meant another trip to the Cotton Bowl to take on Notre Dame for the second consecutive season, only to fall in a close 24-21 contest.

2000 Season Opener — Notre Dame 24, Texas A&M 10

Tom Hauck /Allsport

Another beatdown for the Maroon & White against the Fighting Irish, Texas A&M traveled to South Bend to face an option-based offense behind quarterback turned wide receiver Arnaz Battle. The Aggies failed to find their mojo until the second week of the season. Oh, and this remains the only visit to South Bend in program history.

Advertisement

2001 Season Opener — Texas A&M 24, Notre Dame 3

Ronald Martinez/Allsport

Finally, a win against Notre Dame, this time inside Kyle Field during the third week of the 2001 season, even though this was by far one of the worst Irish offenses in program history. Hey, a win is a win!

All-Time Results

Ronald Martinez/Allsport

As it stands, Notre Dame holds a slight 3-2 lead in the series as the 2024 season-opening battle will be the first matchup since 2001, as new Aggies head coach Mike Elko, who served as Notre Dame’s defensive coordinator in 2017, will also face his former Duke Quarterback, Riley Leonard, who transferred to Notre Dame this offseason. In 2025, Texas A&M will travel to South Bend for a Sept 13 matchup for just the second time in program history.

Advertisement



Source link

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Texas

Athletic trainer tells us how Houston-area athletes beat the Texas heat

Published

on

Athletic trainer tells us how Houston-area athletes beat the Texas heat


With intense heat now and over the Memorial Day weekend, Houstonians are gearing up for sweltering humidity, extreme UV indexes and triple-digit temperatures. In the presence of the infamous Texas heat, maintaining proper hydration is vital to keeping Houston’s high school athletes safe.

KPRC 2′s Michael Horton spoke with Alyce Kessler, who just completed her fifth year as an athletic trainer. She is employed by Houston Methodist Sugar Land Hospital and is contracted with Almeida Crawford High School in Fort Bend ISD.

As an athletic trainer at a Texas high school, keeping athletes hydrated is a major element of Kessler’s job. On a typical day during football season, she is at the campus before the athletic periods making sure that the water basins are prepared and meticulously placed in every area where practices will take place.

Along with providing access to water, Kessler and the other trainers must keep track of the outdoor conditions to make sure the weather isn’t too intense to safely practice. To calculate this, the school uses a wet-bulb globe thermometer. On top of general air temperature, this device measures humidity, radiant heat and wind speed to provide a complete picture of the outside elements. Not only has FBISD adopted the wet-bulb globe measurements for athletics, but Texas UIL has recommended it for marching bands as well.

The wet-bulb globe temperature index has five categories, with Category 1 being the calmest and Category 5 being the most severe. On a typical summer day, Kessler estimates that the wet-bulb globe temperature is a Category 2 or 3, The guidelines affiliated with these categories include several precautions, including shorter practice times, more rest time and dedicated hydration breaks. On a Category 3 day, practices can only be two hours long, and athletes get a rest break of four to five minutes every hour.

Advertisement

Here’s the rest of Michael and Alyce’s discussion:

Michael Horton:. How do the coaches feel about these [guidelines]? Are they positively received by the administration?

Alyce Kessler: I personally believe that the Fort Bend [ISD] administration has taken very well to these recommendations. We’re one of the first districts in our area to really take these recommendations and enforce them and monitor them with our schools and for our student athletes. In my personal experience, I think that the coaches that I have worked with really appreciate us taking the time to keep the kids safe. I know it does alter their practice plans, but they’re really looking to myself and my coworker as athletic trainer to tell them what is going to be the best environment for our kids to practice and play in. And that’s just because they’re working out in Texas heat, and they don’t want these kids to experience any kind of heat illnesses, including exertional heat stroke. Because that is a leading cause of preventable death that in high school athletes. So, we don’t want that to happen.

We want to keep our kids as safe as possible. We do that by preventing these illnesses from happening. That comes with monitoring the wet-bulb globe temp; that comes from having our precaution items out. So, we keep a bunch of different tools in our toolbox to keep these kids safe. One of those is called the Polar Life Pod. You can use really even a tarp or a Rubbermaid container, like a big one and have ice and water ready. So, if a kid is experiencing those heat illness symptoms, they can we can get them cooled down and bring their body to a normal level if we did need to transport them.

Michael Horton: What are those particular symptoms that you mentioned?

Advertisement

Alyce Kessler: Symptoms can include dizziness, headache and blurred vision. And when we’re talking about other types of more intense illnesses, we would see kind of see a gradual incline. We would see peak cramping. That’s a good first symptom if kids haven’t had enough to drink, water-wise. Or maybe they have had enough to drink, but their sweat ratio is coming down. So, they haven’t had enough sodium to then absorb that existing water.

Michael Horton: Do you have any general hydration tips for Houstonians who are active outside during these especially hot months?

Alyce Kessler: Yeah. So, there’s not really a magic number for kids—or really anybody—to drink each day. It’s something that they really need to learn about themselves and how their body reacts. But we try and advocate for our kids to drink about two to three cups of water, prior to exercising and then about a cup about 10, 15 minutes prior.

If that’s a little bit hard for them to manage, I try and make it a little bit easier by saying your body weight divided by two, and that’s how many ounces you should be drinking. Say that we have a kiddo in 10th grade; he’s 150 pounds. He automatically needs 75 ounces of water that day. Then depending on, you know, how much he’s sweating during working out, we would recommend about eight to 10 ounces during the workout, per hour.

Michael Horton: Are there any mistakes or myths you see surrounding hydration and athletics?

Advertisement

Alyce Kessler: I wouldn’t say I see a lot of it. I know a lot of student athletes these days think anything they’re drinking is considered hydration. But we want to remember that the different ingredients of a drink are not always hydrating you. So, they need to really look at the content.

A lot of kids think energy drinks are fine to be drinking, but those are really going to dehydrate them more than actually hydrating them and can actually be hurtful for them. So, I try and have them stay away from those as much as possible, and we really try and encourage if they’re going to be drinking sports type drinks, that they look at the contents and make sure that there is a balance in carbohydrates and sodium, because that sodium is going to help for that water to be reabsorbed, which is what we want. Because if they’re drinking too much water and they’re not actually absorbing any of it, they can feel bloated, and that’s going to make them a little bit more inclined to feel sick.

Michael Horton: At the risk of making this sound like a promotion, are there any brands or supplements you recommend outside of just water?

Alyce Kessler: Within our budget, we buy Gatorade products here. [We use] powder to make Gatorade for especially hot practices, games, things like that. Because it does have a good ratio to what is provided. And then we do have different things that you can buy as an athletic trainer for your athletic training room, and one of them is it’s GatorLyte. It’s basically a salt packet. I’ll say anything similar to that, because we want to encourage absorption of the water. But that’s what we use here. I’m sure there’s other brands that that work very well that other athletic training rooms use. But that’s what I’ve used in my practice as an athletic trainer.

Michael Horton: Is there anything we didn’t get to that you think is applicable for hydration in high school athletics and Houstonians in general?

Advertisement

Alyce Kessler: Yeah, the athletics figures on high school campuses are going to be a huge, huge help in preventing these, preventable injuries and illnesses from occurring to kids. Having these highly qualified, you know, health care professionals on all campuses can really make or break how these kids are feeling and how they’re learning to take care of their bodies. Ultimately, we are teaching them how to advocate for their own health care and how to take care of their bodies. If they don’t have someone helping them learn that, then those skills might not be learned. That can lead to some pretty serious problems both in the present and in the future.

Michael Horton: Would you say the majority of schools have people in these positions to lead these kinds of conversations?

Alyce Kessler: That’s a no. I think it really depends on districts and how they choose to spend their money in athletics. I know that Fort Bend has at least two athletic trainers at every campus. Some campuses have three. That is really great for those kids. I know some districts have chosen to shy away from having campus athletic trainers, and they have athletic trainers at games. And, although I’m always going to be advocating for us as healthcare professionals to be on campus, I would say that even having them at games is going to be very beneficial for these student athletes.

Copyright 2024 by KPRC Click2Houston – All rights reserved.



Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Texas

More than 55K Without Power in Central Texas

Published

on

More than 55K Without Power in Central Texas


WACO, Texas (KWTX) – Roughly 55,000 people were without power Thursday morning following strong storms and a confirmed tornado in Central Texas.

According to the Oncor power outage map, the bulk of the power problems were in the Waco, Killeen, and Temple areas.

The National Weather Service confirmed a tornado touched down in the city of Temple Wednesday evening.

Emergency crews told News 10, there have been no deaths or injuries reported in connection with the weather.

Advertisement

In terms of restoring power, Oncor said it has teams assessing the damage, making repairs, and the lights should come back on by Thursday 9:30 p.m.

The agency said the severe storms produced damaging wind gusts, leading to electric poles and towers being damaged, trees toppled, and branches impacting the electrical equipment.

As Oncor crews work, and residents assess their own damage, the agency warns the public about being cautious around downed power lines.

It said, to keep pets and others away from them and call 911 immediately.

Since the potential for the line being energized, it reminds that anything touching it, such as a tree branch, could shock you.

Advertisement

“Do not attempt to remove debris and tree limbs from areas near power lines,” said Oncor.



Source link

Continue Reading

Texas

Oklahoma State rolls past Texas Tech behind huge performance from Carson Benge

Published

on

Oklahoma State rolls past Texas Tech behind huge performance from Carson Benge


ARLINGTON — Carson Benge pitched effectively into the seventh inning with 10 strikeouts and had three hits to lead second-seeded Oklahoma State to a 7-2 win over 10th-seeded Texas Tech in the Big 12 Conference Tournament on Wednesday night.

The Cowboys were up 4-0 and Benge had allowed just two hits before Gavin Kash followed a one-out error with a home run to right field. Benge moved to designated hitter after that.

Oklahoma State (37-16) plays eighth-seeded UCF on Thursday while the Red Raiders (31-25) face fifth-seeded Cincinnati in an elimination game.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Benge doubled ahead of Zach Ehrhard’s home run in the first inning. Benge led off the bottom of the fifth with a single and came around to score on a bases loaded walk. He added a single in the sixth inning.

Texas College Sports

Get the latest college sports news, scores and analysis.

Or with:

Advertisement

Eight Texas Tech pitchers issued 13 walks but Oklahoma State only had eight hits and stranded 13 runners. Starter Zach Erdman (0-1) took the loss.

Related Stories

View More
    Mississippi State surges past Texas A&M with late-inning heroics
    Cincinnati barely holds onto big lead, eliminates Texas from Big 12 tourney

Advertisement

Find more college sports coverage from The Dallas Morning News here.

Find more Texas Tech coverage from The Dallas Morning News here.

Advertisement



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending