Connect with us

Northeast

Trump eyes a state no Republican has carried in a quarter century amid Biden post-debate turmoil

Published

on

Trump eyes a state no Republican has carried in a quarter century amid Biden post-debate turmoil

NEWFIELDS, N.H. — It’s been 24 years since a Republican carried the swing state of New Hampshire in a presidential election.

You have to go back to then-Texas Gov. George W. Bush in 2000. Four years later, as he won re-election, then-President Bush was narrowly edged in the Granite State, kicking off a losing streak that has extended to the present day.

But in the wake of two recent polls that indicated a margin-of-error race in New Hampshire and following President Biden’s extremely rough debate performance nine days ago in his first primetime face-to-face showdown with former President Trump, Republicans are increasingly hopeful they can bring an end to the losing streak.

BIDEN FACES THE MOST CONSEQUENTIAL STRETCH OF HIS POLITICAL CAREER

Former President Donald Trump speaks as he celebrates a victory in New Hampshire’s Republican presidential primary in Nashua, New Hampshire, on Jan. 23. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Advertisement

“I firmly believe that New Hampshire is very much in play,” Steve Stepanek, the senior Trump adviser in the state, told Fox News.

Former longtime state party chair and former Democratic National Committee member Kathy Sullivan disagreed, spotlighting that “New Hampshire is not Trump-friendly territory” and that “there’s nothing changing the dynamic now in terms of Biden versus Trump in New Hampshire.” 

BIDEN RAMPS UP SPENDING IN BID TO STEADY HIS FALTERING CAMPAIGN

Since the start of the general election rematch between Biden and Trump four months ago, much of the campaign spotlight has shined on the seven key battlegrounds that decided the 2020 election. Those states include Pennsylvania, Michigan, Wisconsin, Georgia, Arizona and Nevada — which Biden narrowly carried four years ago — and North Carolina, which Trump won by a razor-thin margin.

Starting in May, Trump’s campaign started eyeing Minnesota and Virginia, two blue-leaning states in presidential contests, with his top advisers saying they were “clearly in play.”

Advertisement

Trump headlined a Minnesota GOP fundraising gala later that month, and last week, on the day after his debate with Biden, Trump held a large rally in Virginia.

Joe Biden, Donald Trump

Former President Trump and President Biden face off at a debate in Atlanta on June 27. (Getty Images)

The debate was a major setback for Biden, who at 81 is the oldest president in the nation’s history. His halting delivery and stumbling answers at the showdown in Atlanta sparked widespread panic in the Democratic Party and sparked a rising tide of calls from within his own party for him to step aside as its 2024 standard-bearer.

Fighting back, Biden is now aiming to show Americans that he still has the stamina and acuity to handle the toughest and most demanding job in the world and prove that he has the energy and fortitude to defeat Trump.

TOP NON-PARTISAN POLITICAL HANDICAPPER SHIFTS TWO STATES TOWARDS TRUMP

Earlier this week, well-known non-partisan political handicapper Sabato’s Crystal Ball shifted two key states towards Trump in the wake of the debate.

Advertisement

Michigan was shifted from “Leans Democrat” to “Toss-up” and Minnesota was moved from “Likely Democrat” to “Leans Democrat.”

In New Hampshire, a poll conducted after the debate by the Saint Anselm College Survey Center suggested that Trump was edging Biden by two points, which was within the survey’s sampling error. The poll followed a survey conducted in late May by the University of New Hampshire Survey Center which indicated Biden with a lower single-digit edge.

“I do think we are now in a battleground,” said Neil Levesque, executive director of the New Hampshire Institute of Politics at Saint Anselm College. “You are likely to see states that are similar to ours that show it’s tied up or Trump has the lead.”

President Biden holding microphone

President Biden speaks to supporters during a visit to a campaign field office in Manchester, New Hampshire, on March 11. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

But pointing to the new poll, Levesque told Fox News that “the good news for Biden is he’s weak with the people who self-describe as very liberal. Just 67% support. That means, in the end, most likely many of those people are going to vote for Biden even if they don’t want to admit it right now.”

New England College president Wayne Lesperance, a veteran New Hampshire-based political science professor, also said that the state “is in play.”

Advertisement

“Biden’s performance at the most recent debate has pushed Democrats to question his ability to campaign, win and govern. Recent polls in New Hampshire point to continued rock-solid support by Republicans for Trump. Democratic support seems to be faltering with some looking at independent candidates,” Lesperance noted. “As long as questions remain about Biden’s ability to go forward, the President will continue to bleed support, putting the Granite State in play.”

TRUMP GETS BOOST IN POST-DEBATE POLLS AFTER BIDEN’S BOTCHED PERFORMANCE

While the polls indicate a close contest in a state Biden carried by seven points over Trump four years ago, the Democrats currently hold a very large organizational advantage over the GOP when it comes to ground-game operations.

The Biden re-election team and the state Democratic coordinated campaign have 14 field offices across New Hampshire, with boots on the ground since January. Meanwhile, the Trump team and the GOP currently have one field office in addition to the campaign’s state headquarters.

“New Hampshire Democrats will continue to use our robust, grassroots campaign infrastructure to reach Granite Staters in every corner of New Hampshire to ensure we come together and re-elect President Biden and Vice President Harris in November — the stakes could not be higher,” longtime state Democratic Party chair Ray Buckley emphasized in a statement.

Advertisement

But Stepanek, who chaired Trump’s 2016 campaign in New Hampshire before later serving as state GOP chair, touted that “there’s an army of Trump supporters out there, and they’re all coming out.”

“It’s going to be a turnout situation, and we feel we have a very significant ground game that’s going to turnout not only all the Trump supporters but all the Republicans and independents leaning Republican in spite of all the things the Democrats have on the ground here in New Hampshire,” Stepanek predicted.

And he argued that the Democrats “have a significant enthusiasm gap that they are contending with, and we don’t have that.”

As for specifics on how the Trump campaign will build out its ground game in New Hampshire, Stepanek answered, “My game plan I can’t tell you because it’s confidential.”

Advertisement

Sullivan, a top Biden surrogate in New Hampshire, shot back, claiming that when it comes to ground-game operations, “Republicans always say they’re going to do something, and they never follow through.”

Sullivan pointed to the Democrats’ “incredibly strong ground game and seeing nothing on the ground from the Trump campaign.” She also spotlighted that “the issues like abortion, the Republicans are just not in the mainstream.”

“Between the ground game, the issues, the spending by the Biden campaign and the lack of any presence by the Trump campaign, I don’t see the Republicans catching up,” she predicted.

Supporters of the write-in Joe Biden effort in the New Hampshire primary stand for a photo in Concord, New Hampshire, on Jan. 19.

Supporters of the write-in Joe Biden effort in the New Hampshire primary stand for a photo in Concord, New Hampshire, on Jan. 19. (Fox News – Clare O’Connor)

Sullivan also highlighted that they “got a real good head start when we had the write-in Biden effort,” as she referenced the outside effort by state Democrats that boosted the president to a large victory in New Hampshire’s unsanctioned Democratic presidential primary in January, where Biden wasn’t on the ballot.

And in a state where Trump’s GOP presidential primary rival, former U.N. ambassador and former South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley, won 43% of the vote — losing to Trump by only 11 points — Sullivan noted that “the Biden campaign is going to be reaching out to moderate to conservative Republicans who understand what a danger Donald Trump is to our democracy.”

Advertisement

Get the latest updates from the 2024 campaign trail, exclusive interviews and more at our Fox News Digital election hub.

Read the full article from Here

Advertisement
Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Northeast

Trump shooter Thomas Crooks' family had 14 guns in home, father legally sold gun to son: FBI Director Wray

Published

on

Trump shooter Thomas Crooks' family had 14 guns in home, father legally sold gun to son: FBI Director Wray

Join Fox News for access to this content

You have reached your maximum number of articles. Log in or create an account FREE of charge to continue reading.

By entering your email and pushing continue, you are agreeing to Fox News’ Terms of Use and Privacy Policy, which includes our Notice of Financial Incentive.

Please enter a valid email address.

Having trouble? Click here.

BETHEL PARK, Pa. — FBI Director Christopher Wray revealed on Wednesday that Thomas Crooks’ family had more than a dozen firearms in their Pennsylvania home and that father Matthew Crooks legally sold his son the weapon that the 20-year-old would use in his assassination attempt on former President Trump.

“We located a number of firearms associated with the shooter and his family,” Wray told the House Judiciary Committee. “I think it was a total of … 14 in the house.”

Advertisement

“The weapon that he used for the attempted assassination was an AR-style rifle that was purchased legally,” Wray said. “We believe, based on what we’ve seen, that his father, after purchasing the gun, legally sold the gun to his son.”

This revelation came on the same day that Mary Crooks, the mother of the would-be Trump assassin, was pictured outside for the first time since her son opened fire at the rally in Butler.

The gunman’s mother, who is blind, was guided by her husband from their blue Toyota Tacoma into their Bethel Park home around 7 p.m. on Wednesday. Matthew Crooks opened her car door for her and held her hand as they entered the house.

TRUMP SHOOTING: TIMELINE OF ASSASSINATION ATTEMPT RAISES QUESTIONS ABOUT HOW GUNMAN EVADED SECURITY

The younger Crooks was a “fairly avid shooting enthusiast,” Wray said during Wednesday’s testimony.

Advertisement

In addition to the AR-15 and magazines for the rifle, a bulletproof vest and “crude” explosive devices that could be detonated remotely were found in Crooks’ car after he was shot dead by a Secret Service sniper, Wray said.

The FBI director said the agency is still searching for a manifesto or other clues that could determine the 20-year-old Crooks’ motive for the attack that nearly killed Trump, injured two rallygoers and killed retired volunteer fire chief Corey Comperatore on July 13. He added that the bureau’s behavioral analysis unit was assembling a profile of the shooter.

DETAILS ABOUT HOW TRUMP SHOOTER SCALED BUTLER RALLY ROOF EMERGE IN FBI DIRECTOR CHRISTOPHER WRAY’S TESTIMONY

Thomas Matthew Crooks (Handout via AFP)

TRUMP SHOOTER WAS NOT ONLY SUSPICIOUS PERSON AT BUTLER RALLY: PENNSYLVANIA STATE POLICE COMMISSIONER

Advertisement

The FBI has conducted more than 400 interviews in their investigation of the shooting. Typically, the FBI does not discuss ongoing investigations, but Wray said on Tuesday that “the attempted assassination of the former president was an attack on our democracy” and that he “recognize[d] the congressional and public interest in this case.”

The gunman’s father told reporters this week that his family was not ready to comment on their son’s actions.

Trump assassin's father Thomas Crooks with a full shopping cart in the carpark of a supermarket.

Matthew Crooks leaves a supermarket in Bethel Park, Pennsylvania, on July 22, 2024. (Derek Shook for Fox News Digital)

“We’re going to release a statement when our legal counsel advises us to do so. Until then, we have no comment,” he told Fox News Digital before beginning to load groceries into his vehicle outside a Shop ‘n Save near the family’s home. “We just want to try to take care of ourselves right now. Please, just give us our space.”

Read the full article from Here

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Boston, MA

How Boston said no to the 2024 Summer Olympics – The Boston Globe

Published

on

How Boston said no to the 2024 Summer Olympics – The Boston Globe


For a fleeting flash, Boston looked like a bona fide contender to host the 2024 Summer Games. The United States Olympic and Paralympic Committee chose the city as its candidate, but then, armed with facts, gumption, and a penchant for democracy, an unlikely alliance of two anti-Games groups teamed up to torpedo the bid, forcing the USOC to hand the role to Los Angeles instead. In truth, Bostonians dodged disaster, and they have a plucky band of political activists to thank for it.

Confronting the Olympics is a classic David vs. Goliath battle that often pits raw economic power against scrappy people power. Boston’s bid for the 2024 Olympics was no exception. Games boosters included John Fish, the construction tycoon who served as the Boston 2024 chairman, New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft, Steve Pagliuca of Bain Capital, and then-Boston mayor Marty Walsh.

Opposing this formidable network were two groups: No Boston Olympics, largely comprised of 30-something white-collar professionals and up-and-coming policy makers, and No Boston 2024, made up mostly of grass-roots activists, some of whom participated in the Occupy Boston movement and felt comfortable frequenting radical political circles.

The orchestrated frenzy of the Olympics, that festival of sporting brilliance, arrives with serious, entrenched downsides for the host city. Anti-Olympic activists in Boston illuminated these pitfalls, drawing from social-science research. Looking at the evidence-driven claims of Boston’s Olympic critics as the Paris 2024 Games unfold helps us see with piercing clarity how right they were.

Advertisement

Olympic costs were a vital arrow in Boston’s anti-Games quiver. As No Boston Olympics cochair Chris Dempsey told me: “The financial argument for us was front and center.” Activist Reginald Mobley added, “The Olympics are deft at hiding behind sports,” but the numbers don’t lie. Indeed, the Games are a real-deal budget-buster: Going back to 1960, every single Olympics for which reliable data exist has gone over budget, according to research from Oxford University.

Researchers found Paris 2024′s current “cost overrun is 115% in real terms,” although “final cost and cost overrun may be higher.” The financial argument helped Boston activists nab the support of fiscal conservatives, thereby broadening their alliance. Activists also raised the opportunity-cost argument: Money spent on a two-and-a-half-week optional sports event would not be spent on schools, roads, or public health.

Another reason activists opposed the Boston bid was the Olympics’ history of turbocharging the displacement of poor and marginalized people. No Boston Olympics activist Claire Blechman told me she expressed concern that building an Olympic venue on Boston Common would have “affected the unhoused people that lived there” and impinged “freedom of movement around the Common,” as public space was converted into private space designed to be safe for profit-making. The city’s poor residents would have been swept aside.

This is precisely what has happened in Paris, where security officials have rounded up unhoused people and migrants and placed them on buses destined for distant French cities before foreign journalists arrive. Activists in Paris call it “nettoyage social,” or social cleansing. The Paris-based activist collective Le Revers de la Médaille (The Other Side of the Medal) carried out a study that revealed a marked uptick in evictions in the lead-up to the 2024 Games affecting more than 12,000 people.

Those opposing the Boston bid also explained how the Olympics intensify surveillance and policing. The state of exception that mega-events inevitably bring provides local and federal law enforcement agencies with an opportunity to secure special weapons, laws, and funding that would be difficult to obtain during normal political times. Crucially, these weapons and laws can remain in place after the Games, cohering into the new normal for policing.

Advertisement

Kade Crockford, director of the Technology for Liberty Program at the ACLU of Massachusetts, said in an interview that “fundamental questions about what impact the Olympics could have on basic civil rights and civil liberties in Boston, not just during the Games or in the run up to the Games, but forever” were a massive red flag. As if on cue, the French National Assembly passed an Olympic Games Law in spring 2023 that green-lit the use of AI-driven video surveillance to police the Olympics, making France the first nation in the European Union to do so.

In challenging Boston’s Olympic bid, activists fully embraced democracy, organizing public meetings, engaging with local media, and filing a flurry of public records requests. Organizer Robin Jacks of No Boston 2024 explained, “We wanted all the transparency” while Olympic boosters “wanted zero.” Such engagement could galvanize vitriolic flak. But activist Jonathan Cohn told me, “I don’t mind attracting the hatred of people in power, because I feel that makes me stronger.”

When, back in 2015, activists in Boston stood shoulder to shoulder with concerned residents of all stripes to jettison the city’s Olympic bid, they sidestepped calamity. This was a complex “cacophony of dissent,” as No Boston Olympics cochair Kelley Gossett put it, not merely “10 people on Twitter,” as Walsh infamously quipped.

You can’t spell Olympics without an L, and Parisians are taking a big L in hosting the Games. They’re painfully aware of it, too: One recent poll found that a whopping 44 percent of locals believe the Games are a “bad idea.”

The sad truth is that the modern-day Olympics are both a glorious gala of sport and a massive albatross slung over the neck of the host city. No Boston 2024 activist Joel Fleming said he was “crossing my fingers for the people of Paris.” Paris might need more than that.

Advertisement

Jules Boykoff is a professor and chair of Department of Politics and Government at Pacific University in Oregon. He played professional soccer and represented the US U-23 Men’s Soccer Team in international competition.





Source link

Continue Reading

Pittsburg, PA

Russell Wilson embracing leadership role in Pittsburgh, excited for training camp in front of Steelers fans

Published

on

Russell Wilson embracing leadership role in Pittsburgh, excited for training camp in front of Steelers fans


LATROBE, Pa. (KDKA) — As training camp is officially underway for the Pittsburgh Steelers, veteran quarterback Russell Wilson is more than ready to get started with the team.  

Wilson was one of the first players to arrive at Saint Vincent College on Wednesday and he’s excited for things to get going as the team’s unquestioned leader of its hopefully new and improved offense.

“I look at it as I’m supposed to lead us the way we’re supposed to,” Wilson said. “I know how to do that at the highest level. I just want to be my best everyday. I think it’s our team, it’s our opportunity to win, it’s our opportunity to do what we want to accomplish and that’s my focus.”

Wilson also spoke about how he was excited to go away for training camp, noting that during his 10 years with the Seattle Seahawks, camp was always ‘right there.’

Advertisement

“I’m excited to get in the playbook and I’m excited for the time with the fellas, for the camaraderie in the locker room.” Wilson added. I’m excited for the fans. I haven’t experienced that part yet, really. Obviously, you’re walking around and all the fans are in Steelers gear and everything else, but to actually be here and to have that experience, it’s game time, you know? It’s that time to get ready to play some football.”

Steelers training camp at Saint Vincent College

The first practice open to the public is scheduled for at 10:30 a.m. The first practice with pads is scheduled for July 30 at 10:30 a.m. 

The Steelers have 16 practices open to the public this summer, including the “Friday Night Lights” practice at Latrobe Memorial Stadium on Aug. 2. The final open practice is on Aug. 14.

Saint Vincent College is one of the few remaining collegiate destination training camps in the NFL, and the school takes great pride in its partnership with the team. 

Admission to all open practices is free, but the Steelers said anyone attending needs a mobile ticket.   

Advertisement

Steelers training camp storylines

After losing to the Buffalo Bills last season in the first round of the playoffs, the Steelers head into 2024 with a revamped roster and a new face on the coaching staff.

Russell Wilson joins the Steelers to run the offense after two seasons with the Denver Broncos, while linebacker Patrick Queen signed a free-agent deal with Pittsburgh after playing his first four seasons with AFC North Division rival Baltimore Ravens.

Arthur Smith is the Steelers’ new offensive coordinator. He recently served as the Atlanta Falcons head coach from 2021 through 2023.

Cam Heyward, who skipped some organized team activities earlier this summer, has made it known that he wants a new contract. The 35-year-old defensive captain is in the final season of his current deal.

“All I know is I want to be here, but we’ll see what happens,” Heyward said last month. “This is my last year here. I’ve had a great career here, but I look forward to playing next year.”

Advertisement



Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Trending