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Here are some safety tips before going out on the water

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Here are some safety tips before going out on the water


ST. LOUIS — Historically, July is when most water-related deaths and accidents occur. The Missouri State Highway Patrol (MSHP) has already reported 14 incidents in July’s first week, including a drowning.


What You Need To Know

  • Don’t swim alone
  • Wear a US coast guard approved life jacket
  • Know everyone’s swimming ability and be attentive to fatigue
  • Be mindful of current, undertow, and submerged debris






In June, there were seven drownings throughout Missouri. The Highway patrol recommends not to swim alone, wear a US coast guard approved life jacket, stay hydrated, and swim in areas with calmer currents.

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Exhaustion is the big concern; it may occur when swimming for too long or too hard, according to the MSHP. Younger and less experienced swimmers may be inattentive to their fatigue before they realize they’re in trouble.

If going on a float trip or swimming in a river with friends, MSHP says to be aware of everyone’s swimming ability. Avoid areas with debris in the water. They also advise against using rope swings and jumping off bridges because submerged logs or branches may be beneath the surface.

MSHP has even more tips on their website specifically for floating.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers echoes the call for lifejackets, and adds that those operating a watercraft should wear an engine cutoff device and always boat sober.



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Missouri

Chiefs May Stay In Missouri Despite Kansas’ Best Efforts

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Chiefs May Stay In Missouri Despite Kansas’ Best Efforts


Though much of the attention has focused on Kansas’ push to serve as the next home for the Kansas City Chiefs, staying in Missouri remains a strong option.

“We are in some pretty significant conversations with leadership on the Missouri side,” Chiefs president Mark Donovan said. “We are in discussions with the folks in Kansas. We are in discussions and continue our discussions with the folks in Missouri.”

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The Chiefs’ current home — GEHA Field at Arrowhead Stadium — resides on the Missouri side of the border, but there had been speculation they’d jump to Kansas after that state’s governor, Laura Kelly, signed into law on June 21 an expansive plan to issue STAR (sales tax and revenue) bonds.

Kansas is one of three states that has this unique funding system, and under this proposal, state lawmakers would issue bonds for up to 70% of the estimated cost of the stadium project.

“We appreciate the effort that the Kansas legislature made to really supercharge STAR Bonds to make it make sense for a professional sports team to come over there and take advantage of that,” Donovan said. “We don’t take that for granted.”

According to this Kansas plan, some of the state’s retail sales tax from the stadium and surrounding business districts — in addition to lottery and sports betting dollars — would go toward paying off the stadium’s STAR bonds.

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After the bonds would be paid off, which is supposed to take 30 years according to the plan, the sales tax from the district would be diverted to the state’s general fund.

Donovan, though, indicated it’s a long way from determining whether that STAR bond proposal is viable.

“There’s a lot of work to be done with Kansas to see what the reality of that is,” Donovan said. “The good news is that it creates more options.”

Donovan said staying at Arrowhead and renovating that structure “very much” remains one of those options.

Though Chiefs are under lease to continue playing there through the end of the 2030 season, Donovan realistically said they need to figure out a direction in the next six months.

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“That’s the timeline we’re working on,” he said. “Six months from today, we’re going to have to have a really good idea where we are. We may not be done-done, but we need to have a really good idea.”

Another upcoming event that could factor in is the election to succeed current Missouri governor Mike Parson.

Parson is a huge Chiefs fan, but that didn’t prevent Missouri’s previous plan from failing.

By a measure of 58% to 42% in April, Jackson County, Mo. residents voted against the 3/8 cent sales tax to help fund the Kansas City Royals’ move to the East Crossroads district and the Chiefs’ renovations at their existing stadium.

One of the most vocal detractors was Jackson County executive Frank White, a five-time All-Star whose No. 20 was retired by the Royals

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White had said the Royals and Chiefs were not transparent on the community benefits that would ensue, that the teams’ ownership should pay more of the bill and that the tax would have cost too much at $2 billion over 40 years.

“It’s just not an equitable situation,” White exclusively shared. “I can’t just rubber stamp this deal because I played sports. I was elected to be a good steward to the taxpayer dollars, and that’s my goal.”

Donovan said he met with White after the vote and had a good conversation.

There also has been discussion that sports betting, which is allowed in Kansas — but not Missouri — could impact the Chiefs’ decision on what to state to play in, but Donovan dismissed that notion.

“I don’t think that is a significant factor,” Donovan said. “If we get something done in Missouri, it’s something we’d be able to add to whatever we’re going to do here, but that’s not a big factor in making the decision one way or the other.”

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Gambling issues aside, the stakes remain high regarding where the Chiefs will call home.

“This is going to impact the future of this franchise for generations,” Donovan said. “We’ve got to get it right and we are going to do the due diligence.”



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Checkers go to Smith, Ewing, Russell, and Wood at Central Missouri Speedway! – St. Louis Racing – STLRacing.com

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Checkers go to Smith, Ewing, Russell, and Wood at Central Missouri Speedway! – St. Louis Racing – STLRacing.com


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Central Missouri Speedway
July 20, 2024
By Sam Stoecklin
For Immediate Release

The sights and sounds of racing returned to Central Missouri Speedway (CMS) on Saturday evening with 48 race teams on hand in four divisions. Entrants included 15 B-Mods, 14 Super Stocks, 10 Pure Stocks, and 8 Midwest Mods.

Seven heat races and four main events were held during the race program with victories going to Brad Smith in B-Mods, Blaine Ewing in Super Stocks, Bobby Russell in Pure Stocks, and David Wood in Midwest Mods.

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POWRi B-Mod – 15 Entries
Heat 1 – 8 Laps | 00:03:26.759:  1. 57-Chad Clancy[1]; 2. 1K-Tim Karrick[4]; 3. 6T-Michael Taylor III[5]; 4. 12C-Stephen Clancy[7]; 5. 7-Anthony Tanner[3]; 6. 94-Jacob Ebert[8]; 7. 447-Kenny Prince[6]; 8. 55-Devin Payne[2]

Heat 2 – 8 Laps | 00:04:54.172:  1. 99S-Brad Smith[2]; 2. 30-Rex Harris[1]; 3. 56-Shadren Turner[5]; 4. 29-Tyler Cochran[3]; 5. 15J-Jake Fetterman[6]; 6. 15-Colin Pierce[7]; 7. 99-Jess Fitzpatrick[4]

Brad Smith and Chad Clancy began the 20-lap B-Mod main event at the front of the field with Smith setting the pace during the early laps while Clancy was let to battle with Tim Karrick for second. Karrick eventually pulled up to challenge high-riding Smith on the low side, but Smith kept his machine in front through a lap nine yellow flag. For the restart, Smith led Karrick, Clancy, Rex Harris, Steven Clancy, and Shadren Turner. By lap 11, Turner moved to the fourth spot as Smith began putting distance on the rest of the field. Turner advanced one more position by lap 14 to take third. Shortly after, he pressured Karrick for the second spot eventually moved into second by lap 19. On this night, Smith held all challengers at bay and collected his 45th career CMS win. Turner finished second with Karrick third. Brothers Chad and Stephen Clancy were fourth and fifth, with Rex Harris rounding out the top six.

A Feature – 20 Laps | 00:08:51.081:  1. 99S-Brad Smith[1]; 2. 56-Shadren Turner[6]; 3. 1K-Tim Karrick[3]; 4. 57-Chad Clancy[2]; 5. 12C-Stephen Clancy[7]; 6. 30-Rex Harris[4]; 7. 94-Jacob Ebert[11]; 8. 15-Colin Pierce[12]; 9. 6T-Michael Taylor III[5]; 10. 7-Anthony Tanner[10]; 11. 15J-Jake Fetterman[9]; 12. 29-Tyler Cochran[8]; 13. 55-Devin Payne[15]; 14. 99-Jess Fitzpatrick[14]; 15. (DNF) 447-Kenny Prince[13]

POWRi Super Stocks – 17 Entries
Heat 1 – 8 Laps | 00:07:10.150:  1. 251-Brian Schutt[2]; 2. 26M-Donnie Miller[1]; 3. 44-James Nighswonger[4]; 4. 10-Marc Carter[5]; 5. 45-Aaron Poe[7]; 6. 77-Daniel McKenzie[3]; 7. 67-Devin Irvin[8]; 8. 25X-Rodger Detherage[6]

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Heat 2 – 8 Laps | 00:03:26.288:  1. 04-Blaine Ewing[2]; 2. 30C-Clayton Campbell[4]; 3. 25-Aaron Murry[5]; 4. 9-Dave Meyer[6]; 5. GO-Jimmy Ngo[1]; 6. 30K-Cameron Kelly[3]; 7. 07D-Mike Daugherty[7]

Just one week prior to their upcoming track special event, Super Stocks were searching for the best way around the track with another solid outing of racing as Lebanon, Missouri’s Brian Schutt and Green Ridge’s Blaine Ewing brought the field to green for 20 laps. After a quick early caution, racing resumed with Ewing holding court over Clayton Campbell, who put heavy pressure on the leader until he eventually took command of the race on lap four. However, one lap later Ewing retook the top spot with Campbell second, Donnie Miller third and Schutt fourth. A lap nine restart bunched the field with Ewing leading Campbell through lap 15. Campbell again turned up the wick and challenged for the lead on lap 16, just as yellow flag conditions flew for a final time. For the restart, Ewing led Campbell and seventh-starting Dave Meyer. In the closing laps, Ewing was free of any challenges as Meyer and Campbell ran hard for the second spot with Meyer eventually claiming the position. In the end, Ewing drove to his ninth career CMS win and fourth of the season. Meyer was second at the line followed by Campbell, Aaron Poe, Donnie Miller, and Schutt.

A Feature – 20 Laps | 00:12:56.847:  1. 04-Blaine Ewing[2]; 2. 9-Dave Meyer[7]; 3. 30C-Clayton Campbell[3]; 4. 45-Aaron Poe[9]; 5. 26M-Donnie Miller[4]; 6. 251-Brian Schutt[1]; 7. 44-James Nighswonger[6]; 8. 164-Michael Muskrat[17]; 9. 77-Daniel McKenzie[11]; 10. 25-Aaron Murry[5]; 11. 25X-Rodger Detherage[15]; 12. GO-Jimmy Ngo[10]; 13. 07D-Mike Daugherty[14]; 14. 30K-Cameron Kelly[12]; 15. (DNF) 10-Marc Carter[8]; 16. (DNF) 67-Devin Irvin[13]; 17. (DNS) 21W-Ted Welschmeyer

Pure Stocks – 10 Entries
Heat 1 8 Laps | 00:03:45.213:  1. M87-Mallory Stiffler[1]; 2. 99-Ryan Oerly[2]; 3. 81-Donnie Devers[3]; 4. 75-Brady Tanner[5]; 5. (DNF) MRS01-Kristina Wyatt[4]

Spencer Reiff and Mallory Stiffler of Hoyt, Kansas earned the row one starting positions for the Pure Stock main event with Reiff quickly grabbing the top spot. The race was slowed by two yellow flags before lap five with Reiff leading the way over Bobby Russell.  At lap seven, Russell challenged Reiff for the top spot just as Ryan Oerly moved to the top three. The race for the front heated up by lap 11 with Reiff narrowly leading Russell. Unfortunately, as the leaders were battling for the lead. Reiff’s car contacted a lapped machine, with Reiff being relegated to the back of the field for rough driving. This paved the way for Russell to capture his twelfth CMS victory and fifth of the season. Oerly moved forward to claim his best-ever CMS finish in second, with Blaine Nolker advancing from eighth to third at the finish. Mallory Stiffler ran a solid fourth with Brady Tanner completing the top five.

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A Feature – 15 Laps | 00:13:03.437:  1. 24-Bobby Russell[3]; 2. 99-Ryan Oerly[4]; 3. F86-Blaine Nolker[8]; 4. M87-Mallory Stiffler[2]; 5. 75-Brady Tanner[7]; 6. 7-Spencer Reiff[1]; 7. MRS01-Kristina Wyatt[9]; 8. (DNF) 81-Donnie Devers[5]; 9. (DNF) 4D-David Doelz[6]; 10. (DNS) 41-Larry Drake

POWRi Midwest Mods – 8 Entries
Heat 1 – 8 Laps | 00:05:10.305:  1. 82-David Wood[7]; 2. 17-Logan Roark[4]; 3. 5D-Dustin Dennison[3]; 4. 98-Terry Smith[8]; 5. 29-Tyler Cochran[2]; 6. 4P-Jesse Hogg[1]; 7. 10-Johnny McGinnis[6]; 8. (DNS) 9-Brian Meyer

Heat 2 – 8 Laps | 00:04:33.488:  1. 7-Spencer Reiff[2]; 2. 24-Bobby Russell[4]; 3. 4D-David Doelz[3]; 4. (DNF) F86-Blaine Nolker[5]; 5. (DNF) 41-Larry Drake[1]

David Wood and multiple-time winner Logan Roark led the way for the 15-lap Midwest Mods main event with Wood setting the early pace. Terry Smith and Roark ran hard and close for the second position with Dustin Dennison eventually joining the battle inside the top three. Wood was well in control of the race but nearly let the win slip from his grasp in the closing stages as his car nearly spun coming for a restart late in the race. However, Wood kept his position and the race ended with a green, white, and checkered flag finish as he collected his second-career CMS win. Dennison advanced from fourth to claim second with Roark third. Brian Meyer ran strong from eighth on the grid to finish fourth with Tyler Cochran completing the top five.

A Feature – 15 Laps | 00:11:13.287:  1. 82-David Wood[1]; 2. 5D-Dustin Dennison[4]; 3. 17-Logan Roark[2]; 4. 9-Brian Meyer[8]; 5. 29-Tyler Cochran[5]; 6. 10-Johnny McGinnis[7]; 7. 4P-Jesse Hogg[6]; 8. (DNF) 98-Terry Smith[3]

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Next week, the Super Stocks take the spotlight for their annual Super Stock Showdown, featuring a $2,500-to-win, 30-lap main event. B-Mods, Midwest Mods, and Pure Stocks will also be on hand for weekly championship points racing. Super Stocks will not compete for track points. All POWRi-sanctioned classes will earn POWRi points accordingly.

On Saturday, pit gates officially open at 4:30, followed by grandstand admissions at 5. The driver’s pill draw cutoff to earn passing points is 6:15 (no passing points if the driver is late checking in). The pit meeting takes place at 6:30, followed by practice hot laps at 7:00, with racing to follow at approximately 7:30.

SPECIAL EVENT ADMISSION INFO:  General Admission – $20, Seniors 65 and Over – $15, Student w/I.D. – $15, Active-Duty Military w/I.D. – $15, Kids Aged 6 to 12 – $6, Permanently Confined to Wheelchair – Free in Grandstands. All Pit Passes are $40 regardless of age. Super Stocks will have a special event entry fee, which is $75 for track-registered drivers and $90 for non-registered drivers at CMS. The entry fee includes the driver’s pit pass and event entry. All other classes pay pit pass only.

Kids’ Night is right around the corner on Saturday, August 3. We have put together an Amazon wish list of items needed to make this a memorable night for youngsters 12 and under. The list may be found at the following link:  www.amazon.com/hz/wishlist/ls/3AWEH6UQNHWVS. The most needed items are bikes for the older aged kids up to age 12, and backpacks.  We thank you in advance for your kids’ night contributions.

CMS is currently taking both Kid’s Night donations for the August 3rd event, and also food and clothing donations for the August 10 food and clothing drive. All donations may be dropped off at the pit entrance on race day.

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CMS is currently in need of some fencing repair with the swinging gates. Seriously interested parties should call Susan Walls at 816.229.1338. No calls after 8 p.m.

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Innocent Missouri prisoner held 43 years freed after trial court orders release

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Innocent Missouri prisoner held 43 years freed after trial court orders release


Wrongfully convicted Missouri inmate Sandra Hemme was released from prison Friday after a monthlong battle with the state’s attorney general who sought to deny the release on procedural and jurisdictional grounds.

Hemme’s release was the outcome of a sequence of motions and petitions. Following Circuit Judge Ryan Horsman’s decision to overturn Hemme’s conviction based on withheld exculpatory evidence, the AG filed a motion to deny her release. In this motion, the AG argued that the court lacked jurisdiction to issue the order, that they had the right to judicial review, and that Hemme would be a danger to herself and others. The appeal court denied this motion and Judge Horsman again ordered Ms. Hemme to be released. The AG then called the correctional facility holding Ms. Hemme and countermanded the order, preventing her release.

In response, Ms. Hemme’s counsel sought to enforce the order to release. The AG in response, requested that the release order be reconsidered. The AG again put forward, among other procedural arguments, that the court lacked jurisdiction to release Ms. Hemme. They also submitted that she needed to serve her other two-year and ten-year sentences for incidents that occurred while prison. Judge Horsman responded to the reconsideration motion by again ordering Hemme to be released by 6 pm on Friday, and for the AG himself to appear in court next Tuesday if he failed to do so, according to the Associated Press.

Sandra Hemme was wrongfully convicted in 1980 for the stabbing murder of Patricia Jeschke. Judge Ryan Horsman found that there was “clear and convincing evidence” that she was innocent. In addition to this claim of actual innocence, Judge Horsman found that the conviction was based on unreliable self-testimony. Hemme had been involuntarily admitted to the hospital when she gave her first statement to police. Shortly before that first statement, she had been administered antipsychotic and sedative medications and confined by leather wrist restraints. Subsequent questioning led to different statements which changed significantly over the course of police interrogations, eventually leading to her confession. Judge Horsman also found that crucial evidence was withheld by the prosecution, prejudicing her case.

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This case was supported by the Innocence Project, an independent nonprofit dedicated to ending overturning wrongful criminal convictions. Founded in 1992 at the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, it has now helped free more than 240 people from prison.



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