Connect with us

Indiana

A Summer Road Trip Along Highway 41 – Travel Indiana

Published

on

A Summer Road Trip Along Highway 41 – Travel Indiana


story by Mike Davis, Executive Director Kentland Economic Development

As I drove from Highway 41 into Kentland, I thought about the town from a visitor’s perspective. And because I’d just left a meeting where we discussed the positive impact women have on the local economy, I became keenly aware of businesses that are owned and/or managed by females in the area.

Pulling into the north side of town, I was enticed by a classic ice cream stand where you order from your car and pay in cash—a nod to simpler times and certainly an ideal way to celebrate a summer road trip. The pleasant voice, ready to take my order through the drive-in’s speaker, was Kim Donohue, who, along with her husband, owns Don’s Drive-In, now in its 50th year. While the menu includes traditional items like chili dogs, corn dogs, and more, I opted for one of their ice cream specialties. I was not disappointed.

Wonder Park

As I continued through town, the Robert & Jeanette Batton Park caught my eye. The 5.5-acre park features a new pavilion, in addition to picnic facilities, baseball fields, and playground. Next to the park is the recently-opened Autumn Trace senior living community.

Advertisement

Driving further south and around Kentland, I took some time to visit two other parks: Cast Park, featuring a soccer field and fishing pond; and the newest park–Wonder Park–dedicated to children ages 2-12, and surrounded with spectacular designs created by South Newton elementary, middle school, and high school art students. The park system is overseen by another female leader, Park Board President Casey Ward.

Cast-Park-Newton-County
Cast Park

Approaching the town square, a quaint full-service grocery store came into view. Murphy’s Food King, now in its 77th year, is the only full service grocery in all of Newton County, and is managed by Colleen Clifton. Taking a quick turn from the grocery, an unusual feature in the town came into view: the parking lane in the middle of the street. Hopping out of the car I took a stroll down 3rd Street, stopping by Cottage on Main, a charming antique and floral shop, owned by Judy King. The shop is a few doors down from the Old Colonial Inn, a fine dining establishment in a classic building constructed in 1894, and directed by Mara Davis.

Don’s-Drive-In
Don’s Drive-In

I passed by Inspiration Fitness Studio created by Bailey Geswein, who also organizes the popular monthly farmers market in downtown Kentland. Crossing the street, I pass by Jodie Havens’ recently opened Simply Stylish Boutique. The charming storefront next door is J.P. STYLE CO., owned by Jessica Pence, a wonderful tasteful ladies and children’s clothing store. Cars were parked in front of a popular style salon owned by Becca Harrington for over a decade.

Backtracking, I sauntered by DX Creations owned by Amanda Rhanor-Saldana, which is adjacent to the Graham Street Barbershop owned by Alicia Gust.

By now I hope visitors realize Kentland truly has a lot to offer; and checking out the real estate market would be a positive exercise. The Real Estate Shoppe on 4th Street is owned by Debby Shuffle- barger, who also serves as the president of the Kentland Town Council, with her associate Ladonna Davidson; there are also two other real estate agents in town. Judy Wirtz and Andrea Standish. Leaving the Real Estate Shoppe you can’t miss the Newton County Mural where historians Kay Babcock and Janet Miller preside over the rich history of Newton County.

Market-No-48
Market No 48

Jumping on US24 West, I pass by Si Senor Restaurant run by Gabriele Moreno, and Market No. 48 with owner McKenna Strasburger. By this time two things were obvious to me. One, Kentland Indiana is a charming small town gem; and two, more than 20 women business owners and directors clearly drive a significant part of our local economy. Their contributions make Kentland a delightful community to visit, work, and live in.

For more information visit: kentland.in.gov.

Newton-County-Historical-Society
Barbara Wilfong, Kay Babcock & Judy Wirtz, Newton County Historical Society

NORTHWEST INDIANA’S NEWEST ATTRACTION!

SOR WILDLIFE ADVENTURE
Exotic Animal Wildlife Park

Advertisement

SOR Wildlife Adventure is a family-owned Wildlife Park. It is situated on approximately 80 acres in Lake Village, Indiana. Raising and caring for exotic animals has always been a part of this family’s everyday life. In early 2021, the SOR family purchased a beautiful plot of land and began building a place where the public can enjoy and learn about wildlife while preserving the natural land their animals call home.

WHAT TO EXPECT WHEN YOU VISIT SOR

When you enter the ranch and pull up to the ticket booth, you will be greeted by a member of the SOR staff. You will stay in your vehicle and immediately drive through a tree-covered terrain admiring the animals as they roam their natural, vast enclosures. So, get comfortable, roll your windows down and see who can spot the animals first! The driving path will end in the parking lot. From there, visitors can park their vehicle and enter the walk-thru portion of the ranch. Take your time, stroll the beautiful landscape and get a closer look at SOR’s smaller animal exhibits. Within the walk-thru adventure, you have the opportunity to feed the animals and possibly meet one of SOR’s baby animals.

WWW.SORWILDLIFE.COM

Advertisement





Source link

Indiana

Mistrial declared in case of Indiana man accused of fatally shooting 5, including pregnant woman

Published

on

Mistrial declared in case of Indiana man accused of fatally shooting 5, including pregnant woman


INDIANOLIS — A judge declared a mistrial in the case of an Indianapolis man accused of fatally shooting five people, including a pregnant woman, after a witness verbally confronted the defendant in front of the jury.

Mistrial declared in case of Indiana man accused of fatally shooting 5, including pregnant woman

Marion County Superior Judge Chris Miller declared the mistrial Tuesday in the trial of Raymond Ronald Lee Childs III, who faces six counts of murder in the January 2021 slayings in an Indianapolis home.

Childs, 20, was arrested a day after the attack and accused of killing his father, stepmother, two teenage relatives, a woman nearly due to give birth, and her unborn son.

Advertisement

The mistrial came after a key witness in the case, Elanso Valez, testified that in the hours after the killings, he had picked up Childs and drove him around Indianapolis. He said Childs later covered his eyes and wept while laying on a bed at Valez’s home in Plainfield, just west of Indianapolis.

“Y’all remember that?” Valez asked Childs from the witness stand, WXIN-TV reported.

The defense and prosecution teams quickly sought to cut Valez off, and the judge tried to intercede from the bench, but Valez continued, asking: “Why did you do it, Raymond?”

The judge admonished Valez for his comments in front of the jurors and sent them from the courtroom so he could speak with attorneys and then each juror individually.

Miller then declared a mistrial, saying he’s “firmly convinced that Mr. Childs cannot get a fair trial.” He set a status conference for Monday with the attorneys.

Advertisement

The killings followed an argument over Childs, who was 17 at the time, staying out late, according to court records. Prosecutors said Childs methodically went from room-to-room, shooting the victims.

The attack killed Childs’ father, Raymond Childs Jr., 42; his stepmother, Kezzie Childs, 42; the couple’s daughter, Rita Childs, 13; son Elijah Childs, 18; and Elijah’s 19-year-old girlfriend Kiara Hawkins, who died at a hospital along with her unborn son.

Childs’ 15-year-old brother also was shot but survived after fleeing the house to escape the gunfire.

This article was generated from an automated news agency feed without modifications to text.

Advertisement



Source link

Continue Reading

Indiana

Indiana students face stricter attendance rules, new reading requirements

Published

on

Indiana students face stricter attendance rules, new reading requirements


The Indiana Youth Institute said enhancing educational opportunities means more resources for underfunded schools, to help bridge learning gaps for all Indiana students. Photo by Adobe Stock.

By Joe Ulery
Indiana News Service

As students in Indiana head back to school, they will encounter some stricter classroom rules, including new reading requirements and a tighter absenteeism policy.

Advocates believe the new laws, enacted this year, will enhance the lives of young people.

Tami Silverman, president and CEO of the nonprofit Indiana Youth Institute, said a notable new state law mandates students who fail a reading assessment must repeat the third grade.

Advertisement

“Senate Bill 1, ‘Every Child Learns to Read,’ and really thinking about that third-grade literacy,” Silverman explained. “How are we going to continue to build a foundation so that all of our kids — particularly our youngest ones — get those strong early reading skills?”

The 2024 Indiana Kids Count Data Book revealed only one-third of Indiana fourth-grade students were reading at or above proficiency levels, marking a four-percentage-point decrease from the 2019 rate of 37%.

Also starting this fall, schools are required to report students who have 10 or more unexcused absences to the local prosecutor’s office. The new law may result in legal action against parents whose kids miss too much school.

Looking ahead to the 2025 Indiana legislative session, Silverman noted there is discussion to improve mental health services to address growing concerns among students and educators.

“We’ll continue to look at youth mental health and the services that are needed,” Silverman emphasized. “Many of our kids are suffering from depression, anxiety, suicidal tendencies or contemplation, so we do know there’s already a lot of discussion about that.”

Advertisement

Silverman believes the changes could have a profound impact on the future of Indiana’s youth, providing them with more tools and support to succeed. She added her organization will continue advocating for changes aimed at creating more equitable environments for all children in the state.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email



Source link

Continue Reading

Indiana

Northwestern’s ‘imperfect’ pop-up stadium will make for scenic Indiana football game

Published

on

Northwestern’s ‘imperfect’ pop-up stadium will make for scenic Indiana football game


INDIANAPOLIS — Indiana football will be in for a unique experience when it heads to Evanston to play Northwestern in October.

The Hoosiers played at Ryan Field the last time they visited their Big Ten rival in 2016, but all that’s left of the venue is rubble. 

Northwestern demolished the stadium over a four month-span starting in February as they started the process of an $800 million redevelopment project. That left the Wildcats in search of a temporary home until the 2026 season when construction will be completed on the new 35,000-seat venue.  

Advertisement

Those new digs will be a temporary structure — a ”Lakeside pop up” as coach David Braun called it on Tuesday at Big Ten Media Days — built around its on-campus soccer/lacrosse stadium that sits right off the shores of Lake Michigan. 

They will play five of their home games including the one against Indiana on Oct. 5 at the facility. The program’s other two games (Ohio State and Iillinois) will be played at Wrigley Field. 

More: IU’s Curt Cignetti took shot at Purdue football. Boilermakers kept receipts.

“There have been so many moving parts,” Braun said. “So many experts in their space that have been involved in those conversations to make it best for Northwestern, best for the Big Ten and best for everyone involved.”

Advertisement

Northwestern considered a variety of options from playing its home games at Soldier Field to using the Chicago Fire’s former home, SeatGeek Stadium. Braun threw his support behind the temporary stadium after his interim tag was removed at the end of the 2023 season. 

“I spoke with great conviction that I felt it was in the best interests of our student-athletes, best interests of our program and the best interests of our students on campus for our game day environment,” Braun said. “To be honest with you, this is the best case scenario to bridge the gap to the new Ryan Field.”

It will be a much smaller venue with a capacity of just 15,000, but Braun’s experience coaching a North Dakota State football program that plays at the vaunted Fargodome (18,700 fans) makes him think it could be an advantage. 

“We got an opportunity to give our allotment to our other Big Ten opponent, but the rest of that pop up should be purple,” Braun said. 

More: Why Rutgers coach Greg Schiano anticipates bright future for Indiana football

Advertisement

That doesn’t mean there won’t be any drawbacks including the weather. Braun didn’t know what the locker room situation would be for the visiting team, but campus staff is working through all those logistical hurdles. 

There will be coaching boxes overlooking the field for both Northwestern and the visiting teams to have assistants view the game from a higher vantage point. 

“It’s going to be really unique and I think it’s going to be something that everyone that’s a part of it will remember, it will be imperfect though,” Braun said. 

Michael Niziolek is the Indiana beat reporter for The Bloomington Herald-Times. You can follow him on X @michaelniziolek and read all his coverage by clicking here.





Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading
Advertisement

Trending