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After Biden’s 'terrible' debate, health experts warn of denial dangers, call for investigation of symptoms

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After Biden’s 'terrible' debate, health experts warn of denial dangers, call for investigation of symptoms

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Amid the ongoing fallout from Joe Biden’s lackluster debate performance on June 27, experts continue to react to potential signs of cognitive decline in the 46th president, with the president himself acknowledging on Monday morning, July 8, that he had a “terrible night” and “really regrets” that it happened.

Judy Gaman, CEO of Executive Medicine of Texas — a luxury medical services provider in Southlake — told Fox News Digital over the weekend that Biden’s behaviors highlight a very real health crisis in the U.S.

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“As a country, we need to be talking about the realities of this health crisis — the fact that families are often torn apart by denial,” she said.

DOCTORS EXPRESS CONCERN ABOUT BIDEN’S APPARENT COGNITIVE ISSUES DURING DEBATE: ‘TROUBLING INDICATORS’

While Biden has not been diagnosed with dementia, Gaman said she sees many of the same signs she experienced with her own mother, who suffered from Alzheimer’s disease before her death.

“The person with dementia or Alzheimer’s truly believes they are fine, and can be angered by anyone believing they are not,” Gaman said. (She has not examined or treated Biden.)

President Biden is shown on stage during a campaign rally at Girard College on May 29, 2024, in Philadelphia. Amid the ongoing fallout from Biden’s lackluster debate performance on June 27, experts continue to react to potential signs of cognitive decline in the 46th president. (Getty Images)

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Fox News Digital reached out to both the White House and the Biden campaign but did not receive a response. 

Red flags

Based on his speech and behaviors, Gaman said she believes Biden “certainly” shows signs of a neurological deficit, with Alzheimer’s being a possibility. 

“He stares, loses his thoughts and is rumored to get angry quite easily,” she said. “Watching him is like watching my own mother who had Alzheimer’s,” she added. 

“As a country, we need to be talking about the realities of this health crisis — the fact that families are often torn apart by denial.”

Almost all early Alzheimer’s patients rely on notes to help them remember, Gaman pointed out.

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“As the disease progresses, they require visual aids and instructions to help them complete even the simplest tasks and to remember dates and events.”

Joe Biden

Based on his speech and behaviors, Gaman of Executive Medicine in Texas told Fox News Digital she believes Biden shows signs of a neurological deficit. She has not examined the president. Biden is shown here during the June 27 debate with former President Trump. (Getty Images)

Given Biden’s shuffling feet and lack of arm movement when he walks, Gaman said that Parkinson’s disease could be another possibility.

“If you notice, he also leans forward, which is classic,” she said. “Slowed movement, also known as bradykinesia, is another classic sign. We have all noticed how he looks to be in slow motion.”

IN ALZHEIMER’S BREAKTHROUGH, RESEARCHERS IDENTIFY ‘PROTECTIVE GENE’ THAT DELAYS DISEASE IN HIGH-RISK FAMILY

Dr. Marc Siegel, clinical professor of medicine at NYU Langone Medical Center and a Fox News medical contributor, said it is more likely that Biden has vascular dementia, which is the second most common type of dementia after Alzheimer’s.

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“His gait is not consistent with Parkinson’s disease,” Siegel, who has not treated Biden, told Fox News Digital.

“He was visited by a Parkinson’s expert in January 2024, but the subsequent White House physical said he didn’t have it.” 

“I think what he has is much more consistent with vascular dementia.”

Siegel also said he believes Biden is not showing signs of advancing Alzheimer’s, which would generally involve worsening behavioral issues, delusions and hallucinations.

“I don’t believe this is Alzheimer’s,” the doctor added. “I think what he has is much more consistent with vascular dementia (insufficient blood flow to areas of the brain) from his long-term atrial fibrillation and a result of his brain aneurysm repairs in 1988 and brain bleed at that time.”

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Brain scans

One physician called for an MRI to determine whether Biden has vascular dementia, which is when impaired blood flow to the brain causes problems with memory, reasoning, judgment and other thought processes. (iStock)

Vascular dementia is when impaired blood flow to the brain causes problems with memory, reasoning, judgment and other thought processes, according to Mayo Clinic’s website.

It is often caused by strokes, but can also stem from other medical conditions that affect the blood vessels in the brain.

NEW ALZHEIMER’S TREATMENT ACCELERATES REMOVAL OF PLAQUE FROM THE BRAIN IN CLINICAL TRIALS

Most of the cognitive tests — such as the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and the Montreal Cognitive Assessment — are designed to assess mild cognitive impairment, according to Siegel.

“Biden appears to be far past that,” he said. “I was calling for that from 2020 to 2023.”

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Added Siegel, “He needs an MRI now most of all. We should ask for an MRI.”

The dangers of denial

Regarding the Biden family’s apparent failure to seek help for the president, Gaman said that in her view, she feels there are only three explanations.

“Either they are in denial and have watched this take place over a period of time, so they are less sensitive to the contrast, or they are fully aware but can’t bear the thought of what happens to the family (on many levels) if Joe is no longer president,” she said.

Jill and Joe Biden

President Biden listens as first lady Jill Biden speaks at a post-debate campaign rally on June 28, 2024, in Raleigh, North Carolina. (Getty Images)

Or, Gaman added, it could be that they are actually grieving and want to hold onto the hope that he will somehow get better. 

“Denial is a stage of grief,” she said. “This is worsened by the fact that they’re surrounded by people pressuring them not to let their opponent win.”

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“This is a medical situation, though, of course, it has enormous political implications.”

As far as Biden himself, Siegel said, “He does appear to be in denial. This is very common with dementia or cognitive impairment, as is depression, as those around you start to treat you differently.”

Another possibility, according to Gaman, is that “he probably doesn’t know he has an issue, or he excuses his symptoms. He may not be knowingly covering it up.”

President Biden

“He stares, loses his thoughts and is rumored to get angry quite easily,” an expert said. “Watching him is like watching my own mother who had Alzheimer’s.” (Saul Loeb/AFP)

“This is why family members of those affected must be advocates, protecting them from themselves.”

She went on, “Ask any family who has dealt with Alzheimer’s, dementia or Parkinson’s, and they will tell you that what we are seeing play out [here] is classic with most families who face this.”

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“His story just happens to be playing out on the big stage. Remember, everyone rallying around Biden and covering up the truth has something personal to gain by him continuing to hold office.”

If Biden is experiencing cognitive decline, failure to get him the medical attention he needs could be putting his health in danger, according to Gaman.

dr. marc siegel on fox and friends

“As a physician, I feel compassion for the president,” Dr. Marc Siegel said. “I have learned to feel empathy for anyone who is ill. This is a medical situation, though, of course, it has enormous political implications.” (Fox News)

“While there are certainly no cures for Alzheimer’s or Parkinsons, these conditions are often accelerated by stress and lack of sleep,” she told Fox News Digital. 

“From Joe’s health standpoint, this is like pouring gasoline on a fire. From the standpoint of the country, we need to address this as a health crisis and not a political crisis.”

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Gaman also noted that if Biden does have one of these conditions, he will not ask for help. 

“This is a prime opportunity to increase funding for research, raise awareness and encourage others dealing with this to come out of denial.”

Siegel added that he is also concerned about the possibility of depression, which could make dementia worse.

“As a physician, I feel compassion for the president,” he said. “I have learned to feel empathy for anyone who is ill. This is a medical situation, though, of course, it has enormous political implications.”

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If Biden does have a neurodegenerative condition, Siegel said, the symptoms may wax and wane, but “do not generally get better.”

He added, “He will likely get worse, especially under all this stress and scrutiny.”

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Artificial intelligence detects cancer with 17% more accuracy than doctors in UCLA study

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Artificial intelligence detects cancer with 17% more accuracy than doctors in UCLA study

Artificial intelligence is outpacing doctors when it comes to detecting a common cancer in men.

A new study from UCLA found that an AI tool identified prostate cancer with 84% accuracy — compared to 67% accuracy for cases detected by physicians, according to a press release from the university.

Unfold AI, made by Avenda Health in California — a software recently cleared by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration — uses an AI algorithm to visualize the likelihood of cancer based on various types of clinical data. 

WHAT IS ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE?

In the study, a team of seven urologists and three radiologists analyzed 50 cases where tumors had been removed, looking for signs of residual cancer. 

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A few months later, the AI software performed the same analysis.

A new study from UCLA found that an AI tool identified prostate cancer with 84% accuracy — compared to 67% accuracy for cases detected by physicians. (iStock)

The “negative margin rate” — a medical term that describes the absence of cancer cells surrounding the removed tissue — was 45 times greater in AI-detected cases, so the chances of cancer being left behind was far less.

Ali Kasraeian, M.D., a urologist at Kasraeian Urology in Jacksonville, Florida, said he uses the Unfold AI technology in his consultations with patients about managing their prostate cancer.

AI COULD PREDICT WHETHER CANCER TREATMENTS WILL WORK, EXPERTS SAY: ‘EXCITING TIME IN MEDICINE’

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“The AI takes the information that we currently have about a patient’s prostate cancer — like their pathology, imaging and biopsy results — and creates a 3D cancer estimation map,” he told Fox News Digital via email.  

“The results we get from Unfold AI tell us if a patient will be better suited for focal therapy or more radical therapy, such as radical prostatectomy, or radiation therapy, ensuring we optimize their cancer cure, the personalization of their cancer care, and their quality of life goals.”

“AI is our new diagnostic ally — but like any tool, it works best in human hands.” 

Based on these findings, the AI could lead to more accurate diagnoses and more targeted treatments, reducing the need for full-gland removal and the side effects that can come with it, such as incontinence and impotence, the researchers wrote.

AI MODEL COULD HELP PREDICT LUNG CANCER RISKS IN NON-SMOKERS, STUDY FINDS: ‘SIGNIFICANT ADVANCEMENT’

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Joshua Trachenberg, PhD, is a professor of neurobiology at UCLA — and also a prostate cancer patient himself. After doctors found a slow-growing tumor on his prostate, they recommended removing the gland surgically — but he decided to explore other options.

“I got in touch with a team at UCLA, where I also am a faculty member, that was exploring alternate treatments to total gland removal,” Trachenberg, 56, told Fox News Digital via email.

Prostate model

The “negative margin rate” — a medical term that describes the absence of cancer cells surrounding the removed tissue — was 45 times greater in AI-detected cases, so the chances of cancer being left behind was far less. (iStock)

The UCLA researchers were testing an approach that uses ultrasound to heat tissue and is “focally guided” by MRI to destroy the cancerous tissue without damaging the rest of the gland, he said.

After some imaging scans, it was determined that Trachenberg was a candidate for the experimental therapy.

AI TECH AIMS TO DETECT BREAST CANCER BY MIMICKING RADIOLOGISTS’ EYE MOVEMENTS: ‘A CRITICAL FRIEND’

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“The 3D map created by Unfold AI enabled this team to identify precise margins, target the cancerous area and avoid any functional structures of the gland,” he said. 

“It was able to visualize my cancer and it gave me a much better understanding of my case.”

“It was truly able to visualize my cancer and it gave me a much better understanding of my case.”

Trachenberg is now cancer-free and was able to avoid a radical prostatectomy.

Man cancer treatment

“I would recommend to any prostate cancer patient who is told they need a radical prostatectomy that they take some time to look at all their options, [including] AI technologies,” said a doctor and patient (not pictured).  (iStock)

“So many men are afraid of treatment because of the risks associated with gland removal, and Unfold AI enables therapies that don’t put men through the meat grinder,” he said.

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This type of AI technology gives Trachenberg hope for the future of prostate cancer treatment, he told Fox News Digital.

      

“Too often, we are given only two options: Watch and wait for it to get worse, or take the entire gland out, which often leaves men with lifelong side effects that strain their physical health, emotional health and even their marriages,” he said.

“I would recommend to any prostate cancer patient who is told they need a radical prostatectomy that they take some time to look at all their options, [including] AI technologies.”

Potential risks, limitations

Dr. Harvey Castro, a board-certified emergency medicine physician and national speaker on artificial intelligence based in Dallas, Texas, was not involved in the new study but shared his insights on the potential risks associated with the technology.

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Dr. Harvey Castro

Dr. Harvey Castro, a Dallas, Texas-based board-certified emergency medicine physician and national speaker on artificial intelligence, shared his insights on the potential risks associated with the technology. (Dr. Harvey Castro)

“The accuracy of AI depends heavily on the quality of the data it is trained on,” he told Fox News Digital. “Poor data can lead to inaccurate diagnoses.”

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Castro also cautioned against an “overreliance” on AI.

“While AI is a powerful tool, it should complement, not replace, the clinical judgment of health care professionals,” he said.

“AI is our new diagnostic ally,” Castro added. “But like any tool, it works best in human hands.” 

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AI health care

“While AI is a powerful tool, it should complement, not replace, the clinical judgment of health care professionals,” an expert said. (iStock)

Privacy should also be considered when using this type of technology, according to Castro.

“Handling sensitive patient data with AI necessitates stringent data protection measures to maintain patient trust and confidentiality.”

For more Health articles, visit www.foxnews/health

The cost of AI technologies can also be a significant barrier, added Kasraeian.

“I hope this study encourages us and future payers to make these innovations more accessible to urologists and, most importantly, to our patients.”

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Joe Biden with COVID at age 81: What to know about the risk the virus poses to older adults

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Joe Biden with COVID at age 81: What to know about the risk the virus poses to older adults

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President Joe Biden’s testing positive for COVID-19 this week may spark questions about how the virus affects older adults in America.

Certain populations are at a higher risk of severe illness from COVID — and older adults top that list, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

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On Wednesday, the White House released an announcement of Biden’s positive COVID test, noting that the president had been vaccinated and boosted and was “experiencing mild symptoms.”

AMID SUMMER COVID SURGE WARNING FROM CDC, SHOULD YOU WORRY? DOCTORS WEIGH IN

His upper respiratory symptoms included “rhinorhea (runny nose) and non-productive cough, with general malaise,” according to a statement on the White House’s website.

Here’s what people should know. 

On Wednesday, the White House released an announcement about President Biden’s positive COVID test, noting that the president had been vaccinated and boosted and was “experiencing mild symptoms.” Biden is 81 years old. (Getty Images)

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COVID prognosis for the elderly

More than 81% of COVID-related deaths affect those age 65 and older, the CDC states on its website — and the number of older people who succumb to the virus is 97 times higher than those who are 18 to 29 years old. 

Dr. Norman B. Gaylis, a Florida physician and COVID expert, agreed that adults over 80 years old comprise the highest-risk group for mortality, as they face “multiple significant risks.”

COVID VACCINE COMPANIES TOLD TO FOCUS ON KP.2 VARIANT FOR FALL SHOTS, PER FDA ANNOUNCEMENT

“COVID causes debilitating problems for the elderly, especially if there is a pre-existing neurological condition such as Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s disease,” he told Fox News Digital via email. (He has not examined or treated Biden.)      

A diagnosis of acute COVID can affect the ability of those in this age group to think properly, and often causes a condition known as “brain fog,” he said. 

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“It is a problem, because the elderly are often more susceptible to COVID due to weakened immune systems,” he said.

Best practices after a diagnosis

When someone over age 80 tests positive for the virus, the first course of action is to go into some degree of isolation, Gaylis said.

“It is also important [that people] stay well-hydrated and be cautious not to overexert themselves,” he said. 

Paxlovid medication

Paxlovid, Pfizer’s anti-viral medication to treat COVID-19, is displayed in this picture illustration taken on Oct. 7, 2022. Doctors recommend that older adults seek “proactive treatment.” (REUTERS/Wolfgang Rattay/Illustration)

If symptoms last more than 48 hours, the doctor calls for “proactive treatment.”

Take Paxlovid or approved nutraceuticals with zinc that boost the immune system,” he recommended. 

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If symptoms do not decrease after 36 hours — or if symptoms are severe — the patient should seek medical attention right away.

COVID test

More than 81% of COVID-related deaths affect those age 65 and older, the CDC says on its website — and the number of older people who succumb to the virus is 97 times higher than those who are 18 to 29 years old.  (iStock)

“With those in their 80s, it is crucial to check and make sure major organs are not being affected,” Gaylis said. 

Regarding Biden’s case of COVID, Gaylis said that only the president’s personal physician can speak to his condition and outlook for recovery. 

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“But we should certainly be more concerned about his condition than we would be with someone much younger — and because of his age, we also have to be aware of the risk of long-term health consequences,” he added.

“The elderly are often more susceptible to COVID due to weakened immune systems.”

As of Friday, Biden had completed his fourth dose of Paxlovid and “continues to tolerate treatment well,” according to an updated statement issued from the White House.

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“His loose, non­productive cough and hoarseness continue to be his primary symptoms, but they have improved meaningfully from yesterday,” the statement said.

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Biden will be 82 years old in Nov. 2024. 

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Ask a doctor: ‘Is it safe to swim underwater with my eyes open?’

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Ask a doctor: ‘Is it safe to swim underwater with my eyes open?’

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Hot summer days include plenty of pool or beach time for many people — but it’s important to stay safe while swimming.

While it may be tempting to open your eyes underwater, experts warn that prolonged exposure could put your vision at risk.

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Fox News Digital spoke with Brian Boxer Wachler, M.D., an ophthalmologist in Beverly Hills, California, who is also a medical reviewer with All About Vision, an online resource, about what happens when people take a peek while swimming.

ASK A DOCTOR: ‘WHY ARE MY EYES OFTEN BLOODSHOT?’

A quick glance likely won’t be harmful, the expert said — but extended periods of underwater peeping could cause problems.

“Usually when people open their eyes underwater, the [eyes] begin to feel irritated and they will close their eyes pretty quickly,” Wachler said. 

It may be tempting to open your eyes underwater, but experts warn that prolonged exposure could put your vision at risk. (iStock)

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When swimming in pool water, the chlorine can irritate the eyes, he warned.

Chlorine can cause damage to the outer layer cells that protect the cornea, Dr. Muriel Schornack, a Mayo Clinic optometrist in Minnesota, stated on the clinic’s website.

NEBRASKA BABY BORN WITH CATARACTS HAS 3 EYE SURGERIES TO SAVE HER SIGHT: ‘I JUST KEPT PRAYING’

As a result, the eye may become red, irritated or sensitive to light, the doctor warned. 

You may also notice blurred vision.

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Man swimming underwater

Swimming in saltwater or untreated freshwater can potentially introduce bacteria into the eyes, a doctor said. (iStock)

“A lot of folks who are highly nearsighted or highly farsighted like to wear their contact lenses while they’re swimming — and if chlorine soaks into those lenses, now you’ve got a reservoir of chlorine on the surface of the eye that’s likely to do damage,” Schornack noted on Mayo Clinic’s site.

ASK A DOCTOR: ‘WHY AM I HEARING MY HEARTBEAT IN MY EARS?’

With saltwater or untreated freshwater, the effects can be even harsher, and can potentially introduce bacteria into the eyes, Wachler warned.

blue eye contact lens

For people who wear contacts while swimming, chlorine can soak into the lenses and cause problems, a doctor said. (iStock)

“Microscopic organisms are found in various bodies of water, and can be both beneficial and harmful,” he said.

Bacteria such as E. coli can thrive in contaminated freshwater, while saltwater teems with decomposers like Vibrio, according to the ophthalmologist.

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“Viruses like those causing hepatitis A can linger in polluted water,” he said. 

“Protozoa such as Giardia can cause diarrhea if ingested from untreated sources, while molds like Aspergillus may be found in damp areas around freshwater.”

Signs that you should see a doctor

If you’ve been swimming with your eyes open for an extended period, watch out for signs of irritation like redness, itchiness and a burning sensation, Wachler advised. 

Woman swimming

For those who want to look underwater while swimming, experts recommend wearing goggles to protect the eyes.

“You might also experience watery eyes or increased sensitivity to light,” he said. 

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“These are usually temporary and go away on their own.”

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If you notice a thicker discharge, have trouble seeing or experience severe pain, it could be a sign of infection and warrants a trip to the doctor.

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For those who want to look underwater while swimming, experts recommend wearing goggles to protect the eyes.

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