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On Bicycling: Escape From Inferno Vegas to Roll Along Oregon's Pacific Coast – LVSportsBiz

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On Bicycling: Escape From Inferno Vegas to Roll Along Oregon's Pacific Coast – LVSportsBiz



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Shop at Jay’s Market at 190 East Flamingo Road at the Koval Lane intersection east of the Strip.

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By Alan Snel, LVSportsBiz.com Publisher-Writer

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The ocean views are so expansive, visually-dramatic and smile-evoking that I don’t even notice or feel the burn in my leg muscles as I slowly grind up another roller-coaster hill on my road bicycle along Pacific Coast Highway route 101 along the Oregon coastline.

It’s the best artwork in the world, natural scenery of an amazing array of landscape features from oceans and large trees to beaches and dunes.

They’re all knitted together in a wonderfully aesthetic way.

And the sunny, 70-degree temperature doesn’t hurt either. Click on images two and four to share the visual road scenes of the Pacific.

I’m cherry-picking the most gorgeous natural segments along the Pacific Ocean on Oregon’s coast to bike.

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The PCH is a north-south road with lots of bends and turns and a healthy number of uphills (and downhills).

*

My favorite under-the-radar Oregon ocean town is the small community of Port Orford, which has a working port anchoring a genuine and scrappy town of about 1,200 or so.

If you zipped through this town on Highway 101, you might not think there are many residential homes.

But I spent Saturday evening bicycling around some legit neighborhoods that even have an official bike route running through them.

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On Saturday, a local bookshop in Port Orford had its door open. So as I biked on Rt 101, I poked my nose in the open store and there was a poetry reading in action.

I was invited in and even offered pie and water.

I stayed in a motel attached to an eatery and it had a nice kitchenette, too.

*

On Sunday I arrived in the Coos Bay-North Bend area to anchor myself for eight nights at an AirBNB at a lovely guesthouse tucked on a steep, forested hill overlooking a river, bay and even dunes where quads are flying through the sand at a national dunes preserve.

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In 1989 during a cross-country solo bicycle ride and bike tour down the Pacific from Seattle to San Francisco, I crossed the Conde B. McCullough Memorial Bridge.

It was a ridiculously narrow bridge with zero bike lane, a short wall on the sidewalk section and a sidewalk that was also very narrow.

This is Highway 101, so you had mammoth RVs, giant 18-wheelers and logging trucks rumbling literally inches from you as you crossed this bridge.

And 35 years later in July 2024, not one iota was different from this bridge that offered a terrifying experience for bicyclists.

Coos Bay has a funky Empire District that I biked through to reach a small fishing village named Charleston.

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I thought Bill Walton would have loved this tie-dye store. RIP Big Man.

Back off Highway 101 were those dunes and I enjoyed biking on the federal dunes road that had access points for campers and their sand-eating quads.

One camp area even had space and corrals for horses.

*

On Monday, it was off to Newport, home of two of my favorite businesses — the Rogue brewery and a fun, author-themed hotel called, Sylvia Beach Hotel.

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Rogue serves up my favorite beer by far — the hazelnut brown ale. It’s a world champion beer. That’s not my opinion. The hazelnut brown ale nectar really is a world champion beer. The sign says so.

*

The drive to Newport included a visit and stop at Cape Perpetua, a dramatic section of the land along Highway 101.

It’s mesmerizing.

 

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The bridges of 101 can be seen from many angles.


 

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Oregon

Ducks countdown to kickoff: At No. 49, an all-time sack master

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Ducks countdown to kickoff: At No. 49, an all-time sack master


The Oregon Ducks start the 2024 season Aug. 31 at home against Idaho. The Oregonian/OregonLive will count down the days with mini-profiles of prominent former and current Ducks whose jersey numbers correspond with the days remaining until the opening kickoff.

Today, No. 49: Defensive end Nick Reed.

• • •

Bio: The Ducks recruited Reed out of Mission Viejo High School (California). During his time at Oregon, Reed earned First-Team All-Pac-10 twice (2007, 2008), was named a First-Team All-American (2008), and was the recipient of the Morris Trophy (2008).

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Key statistics: Reed accumulated a long list of impressive statistical accomplishments at Oregon.

  • Reed’s 13 sacks in 2008 are tied for first in Oregon history. His 12 sacks in 2007 rank tied for third.
  • Twice, Reed had 3 1/2 sacks in a game. That mark ranks tied for second.
  • His 29 1/2 career sacks are tops in program history.
  • Reed’s 51 1/2 career tackles for loss rank second.
  • Reed’s 22 1/2 tackles for loss in 2007 rank second. His 20 tackles for loss in 2008 rank tied for fourth.
  • Reed twice had five tackles for loss in a game, a performance that ranks tied for second all-time.

Reed was inducted into the Oregon Hall of Fame in 2020.

University of Oregon Ducks vs Arizona Sun Devils 1st quarter action by Bruce Ely/The Oregonian Nick Reed sacks Rudy Carpenter LC- THE OREGONIANLC- THE OREGONIAN

NFL: The Seattle Seahawks selected Reed in the seventh round of the 2009 NFL draft. He spent one season with the Seahawks and split his second season between the Chicago Bears and Tampa Bay Buccaneers. Reed played in 26 NFL games.

• • •

PRIOR COUNTDOWN POSTS

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No. 50: Defensive tackle Popo Aumavae

No. 51: Offensive lineman Jeff Kendall.

No. 52: Linebacker Tom Graham.

No. 53: Defensive lineman Igor Olshansky.

No. 54: Three champion linemen.

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No. 55: Centers Hroniss Grasu and Jake Hanson, plus linebacker Casey Matthews.

No. 56: Offensive tackle Gary Zimmerman.

No. 57: Offensive lineman George Dames and the 1957 Rose Bowl team.

No. 58: Defensive end Kenny Rowe and center Jackson Powers-Johnson.

No. 59: Offensive lineman Ian Reynoso.

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No. 60: Center Max Unger.

No. 61: Lineman Steve Barnett.

No. 62: Offensive lineman Matt Pierson.

No. 63: Defensive lineman Vince Goldsmith.

No. 64: Lineman Dave Wilcox.

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No. 65: Offensive lineman Ajani Cornelius

No. 66: Defensive lineman Taylor Hart.

No. 67: Offensive lineman Jack Patera.

No. 68: Offensive lineman Shane Lemieux.

No. 69: Offensive lineman Bo Thran.

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No. 70: Fullback Bob Sanders.

No. 71: Offensive linemen Mark Lewis and Malaesala Aumavae-Laulu.

No. 72: Offensive lineman Adam Snyder.

No. 73: Offensive lineman Tyrell Crosby.

No. 74: Offensive linemen Kyle Long and Tom Drougas.

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No. 75: Offensive tackle Jake Fisher.

No. 76: Offensive tackle Josh Conerly Jr.

No. 77: Offensive lineman Carson York.

No. 78: Offensive linemen Alex Forsyth and Cameron Hunt.

No. 79: Mark Asper, offensive line

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No. 80: Wide receivers Lavasier Tuinei, Greg Moser and Ray Palm

No. 81: Wide receiver Bob Newland

No. 82: Wide receiver Lew Barnes and tight end Blake Spence

No. 83: Tight end Ed Dickson and wide receiver Patrick Johnson

No. 84: Tight end Justin Peelle, linebacker Anthony Trucks, and Cam McCormick

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No. 85: Pharaoh Brown, Tim Day and Matt Evensen.

No. 86: Wide receiver Paul Burleson.

No. 87: Wide receiver Greg Specht

No. 88: Wide receiver Dwayne Stanford and defensive lineman Brandon Bair

No. 89: This team ended a 25-year drought

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No. 90: Tight end Josh Wilcox and defensive lineman Drayton Carlberg



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Oregon expands free Medicaid health insurance to tens of thousands more people – Ashland News – Community-Supported, NonProfit News

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Oregon expands free Medicaid health insurance to tens of thousands more people – Ashland News – Community-Supported, NonProfit News


The state is the third nationwide to expand coverage to people who earn more than limits set by the federal government

By Lynne Terry, Oregon Capital Chronicle

After two years of planning, Oregon is officially expanding its Medicaid program to give tens of thousands of more people access to the free health insurance program. 

The Oregon Health Authority announced on July 1 the launch of its OHP Bridge Plan to those who earn more than the federal limits for traditional Medicaid. The Oregon Health Plan, the state’s version of Medicaid, currently covers 1.4 million Oregonians who earn up to 138% of the federal poverty level, or nearly $21,000 a year for one person or more than $43,000 a year for a family of four.

The OHP Bridge is extending Medicaid benefits to those who earn up to 200% of the federal poverty level. That means that individuals who earn about $30,000 a year or families of four who earn $62,400 a year will qualify.

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Oregon Health Authority officials expect the plan to cover 100,000 Oregonians by 2027.

Dr. Sejal Hathi, director of the health authority, said in a news conference the plan marks a “significant milestone” in Oregon and will help eliminate health inequities, a health authority goal. 

“We know that these higher rates of coverage are associated with better health outcomes, with greater health care access and with fewer health inequities, and we want to keep it that way,” Hathi said.

Who qualifies
People can apply for OHP Bridge coverage by going to ONE.Oregon.gov or HealthCare.gov. People in Oregon will qualify for OHP Bridge if they: 
Are 19 to 64 years old
Have an income between 138% and 200% of the federal poverty level
Are a U.S. citizen or have eligible immigration status
Do not have access to other affordable health insurance
The income limits change every March. For more information, go here: ohp.oregon.gov/Bridge.

Oregon is the third state nationwide — after Minnesota and New York — to expand Medicaid to beyond the traditional federal income limits. But it’s the first state to offer that coverage at no cost, without monthly premiums or co-pays. 

“We know that cost sharing in any form, whether that’s premiums or co-pays, is a barrier to care for people in this income range, and were we to have either or both of those, we would actually see decreased access to care, which is counterproductive for the goals of the state,” said state Sen. Elizabeth Steiner, a medical doctor and one of the lawmakers who developed the bridge plan.

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Like those on Medicaid, people who qualify for the bridge plan will enjoy free medical, dental and mental health care along with some other benefits, such as transportation to medical appointments. 

“This means that more people will be able to get the diagnoses, treatment and other services they need, preventing delays and care that nearly 300,000 Oregonians otherwise report due to costs,” Hathi said. 

Gil Muñoz, chief executive officer of Virginia Garcia Memorial Health Center, which serves many Medicaid patients in Forest Grove, said during the news conference that the plan is a win for working families who have a tough time paying for housing, food, transportation and child care. He said it’s also a boon for providers to work with lower-income families to get them diagnostic services, specialist care and hospital treatment that they need.

“It eases the path to better health and better prevention for these families,” Muñoz said.

Federal approval

Oregon won approval from the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to offer the plan under a Medicaid waiver. That approval means that the federal government will pay much of the cost of the plan, diverting money that it would normally pay in subsidies to people who otherwise would buy health insurance on the federal marketplace. The state will pay the remaining cost. 

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Under traditional Medicaid, the federal government picks up about 60% of the cost, and Oregon pays the rest. Payments for the bridge plan will work differently, with the federal government depositing money into an account and the state reconciling that later. Erica Heartquist, a health authority spokeswoman, said the state estimates that Oregon will receive about $500 million in federal revenue to cover an average of 65,000 members per month over the next 12 months. The state is likely to spend $10 million to administer the program and cover costs not paid for by federal funds. 

Health officials say keeping people covered is cheaper in the end because they take care of basic problems early or even before they start by regularly seeing a primary care provider and receiving preventive care, like cancer screenings and blood tests that track cholesterol and diabetes risk. Those without insurance often wait until a health problem worsens until they’re severely ill and care is more expensive or seek treatment in an emergency room, which is the most expensive kind of care and drives up overall health care costs.

“The basic health plan, OHP Bridge, is a great deal for Oregon taxpayers,” Hathi said.

The plan has been in the works in Oregon for two years, following passage of House Bill 4035 during the 2022 session, which launched a task force to develop the plan. One of the plan’s biggest targets is to cover people who’ve recently lost Medicaid coverage. During the pandemic, the federal government provided extra benefits to states that kept people enrolled, regardless of any income changes. That meant that even when people’s income changed and they technically no longer met the limit, they enjoyed the free coverage.

But last spring, that changed when the federal government ended the program. Since then state officials have gone through the Medicaid rolls, making sure that everyone on Medicaid qualifies. In Oregon, more than 80% of those covered kept the insurance — one of the highest rates in the country, according to an analysis by KFF Health News. 

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About 222,000 have fallen off, and state officials have pointed them to the federal marketplace to buy individual coverage. Hathi said that up to 30,000 people who stayed on Medicaid during the pandemic but no longer qualify will be moved to the bridge plan because they qualify under the bridge plan’s income limits.

Though they will enjoy most Medicaid benefits, those on the bridge plan will not qualify for long-term care, nor will they be able to obtain social services that were approved under a CMS waiver to improve the environment of Medicaid patients. Under the waiver, Oregon can offer climate support, such as a free air conditioner or air filter, to help patients cope with extreme weather events and wildfire smoke; housing support for up to six months; and nutrition education and food assistance.

Officials rolled out the climate benefit this spring, though fewer patients are getting air conditioners than originally hoped. The housing benefit is expected to be offered toward the end of the year and the food benefit after that.

Lynne Terry has more than 30 years of journalism experience, including a recent stint as editor of The Lund Report, a highly regarded health news site. She reported on health and food safety in her 18 years at The Oregonian, was a senior producer at Oregon Public Broadcasting and Paris correspondent for National Public Radio for nine years.



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Golfers head to the Oregon Special Olympics in Corvallis – KTVZ

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Golfers head to the Oregon Special Olympics in Corvallis – KTVZ


There are 60 Central Oregon athletes competing in 4 different sports at the Special Olympics Oregon. Many of those are on the golf team. For golf they compete in skills, which includes driving, chipping, and putting, and the others do 9 holes or 18.

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