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Mississippi security guard shot, killed at convenience store; 3 teenagers charged

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Mississippi security guard shot, killed at convenience store; 3 teenagers charged

A security guard was shot and killed at a Mississippi convenience store Monday morning, according to police.

Two 17-year-old boys and a 16-year-old boy were charged with capital murder in connection with the incident.

Roy Love, 60, was working security at M&M Food Express at 516 Cooper Road in Jackson, Mississippi, when he was shot and killed in the early hours of the morning, Jackson Police Chief Joseph Wade said at a news conference.

2 MURDER SUSPECTS WHO ESCAPED MISSISSIPPI JAIL ARE CAPTURED AFTER MANHUNT

Two 17-year-old boys and a 16-year-old boy are charged with capital murder in the shooting death of 60-year-old Roy Love, who was working security at M&M Food Express in Jackson, Mississippi. (Google Earth)

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At about 1:30 a.m., Love approached the three teenagers and asked them to leave, according to Wade.

“They subsequently attacked him. They took his weapon, and they fired upon him with their weapon,” Wade said.

The chief said the motive of the teenagers, who already had a gun, was to steal Love’s firearm.

“And they succeeded,” Wade said.

FISHERMEN IN MISSISSIPPI PULL DRAMATIC RESCUE OF 38 DOGS TREADING IN WATER

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Jackson Police Chief Joseph Wade

Jackson Police Chief Joseph Wade said video footage of the incident between Roy Love, 60, and the three teens showed that Love never drew his gun. (Jackson Police Department/Facebook)

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Wade said video footage of the incident showed that Love never drew his gun. 

After the shooting, two of the teenagers ran away on foot and the other one fled on a bicycle, Wade said.

Police arrested the three suspects within hours of the encounter.

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True crime podcaster attempts to solve father’s 'strange' murder: ‘He did not deserve to die in this way’

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True crime podcaster attempts to solve father’s 'strange' murder: ‘He did not deserve to die in this way’

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Madison McGhee always believed that her father died from a heart attack – but that all changed in 2012.

The Charleston, Virginia, native, who was 16 at the time, was visiting her family at her grandmother’s house. She suddenly had a strange feeling that she couldn’t breathe. The patriarch was on her mind.

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“I remember after saying goodbye, I got in the car and asked my mom a very weird question,” McGhee recalled to Fox News Digital. “I wasn’t even sure I understood what I was asking at the time. I asked her if my cousin Omar was with my dad when he died, thinking that he had died of a heart attack.”

SERIAL KILLER SURVIVOR WONDERS WHY HE WAS SPARED AFTER CHILLING CAR RIDE: ‘HE WAS A MONSTER’

Madison McGhee is determined to solve her father’s murder and has launched a true-crime podcast, “Ice Cold Case.” (Courtesy of Madison McGhee)

“That’s when my mom told me the truth,” said McGhee. “The truth was my dad was murdered, and it’s still unsolved.”

McGhee, who now resides in Los Angeles, is on a quest to find out what happened to her father. She’s the host of the true-crime podcast, “Ice Cold Case,” where she interviews those who may lead her to answers.

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“For 10 years, my dad in my mind had died of a heart attack,” said McGhee. “But to then find out he died a completely different way? I had to start the process completely over. I had to grieve him all over again. I’ve had to grapple with the truth of what happened to him.”

J.C. holding a smiling young Madison McGhee

For years, Madison McGhee thought her father, J.C., died from a heart attack. (Courtesy of Madison McGhee)

On July 11, 2002, John Cornelius McGhee, also known as “J.C.,” was shot in the head in the doorway of his home in Belmont County, Ohio. He was 45.

McGhee was six years old at the time.

“My most vivid memories of him are almost like a movie,” said McGhee. “I remember being in the car listening to music with him. The song ‘Hot in Here’ by Nelly had just dropped. My dad also loved playing the ‘Space Jam’ soundtrack. Nothing special happened on those days. I don’t remember birthday parties or anything like that. I just remember those little moments listening to music with him in the car. I remember being loved by my dad.”

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Poster for Ice Cold Case

“Ice Cold Case” is available for streaming now. (Beck Media)

It wouldn’t be until 2020 that McGhee was compelled to find out what happened to J.C. and why his death remains unsolved. The coronavirus pandemic was ongoing, and work had slowed down.

“I knew I needed to do something big if I wanted answers,” said McGhee. “I was furiously making phone calls, trying to get these case files, trying to put in requests, just trying to get any access to any records. I started talking to people and making connections. It was a tough journey.”

McGhee said the popularity of true-crime podcasts inspired her to launch “Ice Cold Case.” She believed it would raise awareness and encourage anyone with information to come forward.

Madison McGhees family portrait

Madison McGhee hopes anyone with information about J.C.’s death will come forward. (Courtesy of Madison McGhee)

“I feel pretty confident that I will get to the bottom of this,” she said. “The podcast has already opened up a conversation that no one has had for 22 years. It’s shaken people up a bit, but I also think it opened their eyes to this unsolved case. The locals are talking about it. People who remember this happening are now having epiphanies. . . . It’s shaken up the community and people are wondering why this case isn’t solved. . . . The impact is undeniable. And I don’t want anyone to get away with this.”

J.C. holding a baby Madison McGhee as he smiles proudly.

The podcast revealed that J.C. had been a drug dealer-turned-informant. (Courtesy of Madison McGhee)

According to the podcast, J.C. had been a drug dealer-turned-informant. He helped police arrest several people, including one of his nephews, who was sentenced to life in prison. While the police concluded that J.C.’s murder had been a home invasion gone wrong, McGhee had her doubts.

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“This investigation was very inconclusive and incomplete in my opinion,” McGhee explained. “. . . And I think people who have information are afraid to talk. If the person who killed my dad isn’t in prison for something else, then that means there’s a killer on the loose. That element makes people afraid to talk. They don’t know if my dad got killed potentially because he was a snitch. What message does that send to people who would want to come forward with information?”

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Madison McGhee as a child posing with her mother at the beach.

Madison McGhee said it was her mother who revealed the truth. (Courtesy of Madison McGhee)

That hasn’t deterred McGhee.

“I’ve heard from family members that they are less than thrilled about this show,” she admitted. “I think they’re upset about the skeletons coming out of the closet. Some of them, I think… are worried about how they would be implicated in this. So, they are sending crazy messages. And I think that’s also interesting. It’s a bit telling when someone is feeling so openly defensive. It almost sheds a light on them that maybe they didn’t want.”

McGhee said that after being in the dark for so long, she didn’t think twice about putting the spotlight on those who may have answers.

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Madison McGhees mother holding her as a baby in the hospital with J.C. leaning in.

“I want people to see my father as human. He was a victim, regardless of the circumstances. My dad was a drug dealer, but he was also my dad,” Madison McGhee said. (Courtesy of Madison McGhee)

“My dad used to talk to my mom quite a bit about thinking that someone was going to kill him,” McGhee claimed. “I think he knew and dealt with the weight of his decisions and his lifestyle. My mom used to say, ‘Oh stop, you’re going to be OK. Don’t say that.’ It’s very easy to brush it off, like, ‘You’re a little paranoid. You’re being a little dramatic.’ I think my dad just had a very strong intuition that something was going to happen to him. And it did.”

Madison McGhee holding her baby sister as her father J.C. looks ahead.

Madison McGhee said her father J.C. feared for his life shortly before he was killed. (Courtesy of Madison McGhee)

When McGhee heard the 911 call for the first time, she was left with more questions than answers.

“It didn’t make a lot of sense,” she said. “When I think of a home invasion, I think of a robbery. . . . Nothing was stolen. . . .You would have also heard the gunshot. My dad’s house was on this small hill, but the hill kept going. Then there’s a highway. It echoes. . . . But nothing was brought up about a gunshot. It just seemed strange for a home invasion. It’s all strange.”

McGhee said that since “Ice Cold Case” launched, she has gotten tips and is exploring new leads. She is hopeful that, eventually, she will discover the identity of the person who shot J.C.

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Madison McGhee as a child dressed as a ballerina.

Madison McGhee was six years old when she lost her father. (Courtesy of Madison McGhee)

“Everyone deserves justice – there’s no such thing as the perfect victim,” said McGhee. “I dealt with a lot of uphill battles to get this show out into the world because no one wanted to help me. They just saw a drug dealer-turned-informant from Ohio. But my dad was so much more than that.”

“I want people to see my father as human,” she continued. “He was a victim, regardless of the circumstances. My dad was a drug dealer, but he was also my dad. He did not deserve to die in this way. It’s very easy to say, ‘That’s what he signed up for,’ but no one deserves to be murdered.”

Through the grief, McGhee has gained a deeper appreciation for the man she only knew for six years.

Madison McGhee wearing a grey blazer and light blue jeans.

Madison McGhee is determined to find out what happened to J.C. (Beck Media)

“My dad was a good dad,” she said. “He was dynamic and a good person. I’m now learning from people how he was so generous and helped the people he loved. When you needed help, he was there. . . . Now I’m there for him.”

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This is how we get fentanyl off our streets

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This is how we get fentanyl off our streets

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America is facing a crisis that is forcing families to grapple with the heartbreaking effects of addiction. Cartels are smuggling fentanyl – a synthetic opioid – into our country and flooding communities from coast to coast with the deadly drug. 

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Last year, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) agents stopped 27,023 pounds of fentanyl from entering our country. That same year, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) seized more than 77 million fentanyl pills and nearly 12,000 pounds of fentanyl powder.

To put that into perspective, that is enough fentanyl to kill every single American. 

A firefighter treats a woman in Illinois who reportedly overdosed. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

A deadly dose of fentanyl is considered to be two milligrams, roughly equal to 10-15 grains of table salt or the amount that would fit on the point of a sharpened pencil. According to the DEA, fentanyl is 50 times more potent than heroin and 100 times more potent than morphine.

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Tennessee is now ranked fourth in the nation for the highest number of overdose deaths caused by synthetic opioids, and nearly 80% of drug overdose deaths in Virginia involve fentanyl. Fentanyl is killing Americans at record-high rates. This is a crisis that has touched every corner of our country. 

Before coming to Congress, one of us served as a U.S. attorney, the other as a federal law enforcement officer and CIA case officer. Our combined experience gives us critical insight into investigating and prosecuting drug dealers, as well as working narcotics trafficking cases and tracking cartels. 

We know well the harm that the criminal manufacturing of these drugs on a mass scale can bring to our communities, to our neighbors, and to their families. We also know that Congress must do more to prevent illicit substances – like fentanyl – from being sold on our streets.

VIRGINIA FIRST LADY, AG TEAM WITH RECOVERING ADDICT TO LAUNCH INITIATIVES TARGETING STATE’S FENTANYL CRISIS

That is why we are working together to crack down on narcotics traffickers who use illicit pill presses to manufacture counterfeit drugs. 

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DEA laboratory testing indicates that 7 out of 10 counterfeit pills contain a potentially lethal dose of fentanyl. Counterfeits made in the United States typically use pill press machines that can easily be purchased online and – depending on size and capacity – can manufacture anywhere from 1,800 pills to more than one million pills per hour.

Many of the pill presses shipped to the United States come from China. The U.S. Treasury Department has imposed sanctions on numerous Chinese entities for allegedly distributing pill presses and other equipment used to manufacture illicit fentanyl in the United States. Recently, under “Operation Artemis,” CBP officers at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York seized 14 pill press machines in five separate shipments that arrived from China.

NY FAMILY LOSES DAUGHTER TO FENTANYL OVERDOSE AFTER TAKING 1 PILL

In the United States, pill press laws at the federal level are limited, and state laws are generally weak or nonexistent. Federal law currently prohibits the sale, possession, and use of unregistered pill presses. However, the registration process relies heavily on self-reporting, usually during the sale and transfer of machines. 

For instance, thousands of pill press machines have been sold through eBay, contributing to the current crisis. Current law also states that any person who possesses a pill press machine with the intent to sell shall be sentenced to a term of imprisonment of not more than four years, a fine or both. We believe that the criminals who manufacture and traffic these deadly drugs should face clearer, harsher penalties.

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For more than four years, we have led bipartisan legislation to make possession of a pill press mold with the intent to counterfeit schedule I or II substances a federal crime. Specifically, our Criminalizing Abused Substance Templates (CAST) Act would allow for criminals who possess a pill press and are planning to manufacture counterfeit pills – whether they have yet to do so or not – to be imprisoned for up to 20 years. 

By enacting this change, we would empower our law enforcement officers to crack down on these criminals and help save the lives of countless Americans.

While we may represent vastly different districts, we hear common stories – of Americans struggling with addiction, getting on the road to recovery, and of unimaginable grief. We’ve heard from too many heartbroken parents who have lost their children to an overdose.

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In 2022, officials warned against “rainbow fentanyl” – fentanyl pills and powder that come in a variety of bright colors, shapes and sizes. The influx of these pills was an intentional effort by drug dealers and cartels to get American children and young adults hooked on opioids by making them look like candy. 

By punishing the criminals who use pill presses to make counterfeit drugs, we can take a momentous step forward in our effort to get fentanyl and other deadly drugs off our streets and out of our children’s hands. One death is one too many.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE FROM REP. ABIGAIL SPANBERGER

Congresswoman Abigail Spanberger, a Democrat, represents Virginia’s 7th Congressional District, and serves on the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence and House Agriculture Committee. 

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Florida man arrested for 'written threats to kill' Trump, Vance days after assassination attempt

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Florida man arrested for 'written threats to kill' Trump, Vance days after assassination attempt

A Florida man was accused of making “written threats to kill” former President Trump and Sen. JD Vance and their families just days after a Pennsylvania man attempted to assassinate the 45th president.

The Jupiter Police Department announced that 68-year-old Michael M. Wiseman was arrested on Friday for charges for written threats to kill.

Authorities alleged that Wiseman wrote threats against the Republican presidential nominee and vice presidential nominee on his Facebook account and also made to members of the Trump and Vance families.

CONGRESS DENIED ACCESS TO CRUCIAL TRUMP PROTECTION PLAN SCREAMS ‘COVER YOUR AS–MODE’: EXPERT

The Jupiter Police Department said in a news release that officers arrested Michael W. Wiseman on charges of written threats to kill. (Palm Beach County Jail)

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The police department said it was notified of the threats, including bodily harm, by multiple members of the community.

Jupiter, Florida is about 20 miles, or an approximately 30-minute drive, north of Trump’s Mar-a-Lago home in Palm Beach.

“JPD coordinated the investigation with the United States Secret Service and the Palm Beach County State Attorney’s Office,” the department said. “JPD officers took Wiseman into custody without incident.”

Republican presidential candidate former President Donald Trump is rushed offstage

Republican presidential candidate former President Donald Trump is rushed offstage during a rally on July 13, 2024 in Butler, Pennsylvania. (Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images)

The threat came just days after Trump was shot at in a shocking attempt on the president’s life at a campaign rally in Butler, Pennsylvania.

On Saturday, July 13, as Trump was talking about immigration, the first shot from the would-be assassin was fired.

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POLICE COMB THROUGH THOMAS MATTHEW CROOKS’ VAN THAT HID EXPLOSIVES, VIDEO SHOWS

Corey Comperatore, a firefighter, father and big fan of Trump, was shot in the head and killed.

Two other people — David Dutch, 57, and James Copenhaver, 74 — were critically wounded.

Undated file photo of Thomas Matthew Crooks

Undated file photo of Thomas Matthew Crooks. Crooks is alleged to be the shooter in the assassination attempt on former President Donald Trump in Butler, Pennsylvania on Saturday, July 13, 2024. (Obtained by Fox News Digital)

On Sunday, the FBI identified the gunman as Thomas Matthew Crooks. 

He was 20 years old and lived in Bethel Park, Pennsylvania, about 50 miles from the rally site. 

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He graduated with an associate’s degree in engineering from a local community college and worked at a nursing and rehabilitation center. 

So far, investigators have not revealed Crooks’ motive.



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