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DC police chief asks small business owners to help stop crime – WTOP News

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DC police chief asks small business owners to help stop crime – WTOP News


During a panel on Tuesday, D.C. Police Chief Pamela Smith asked small business owners to let police have access to their cameras to help stop crime.

On Tuesday, D.C. Police Chief Pamela Smith joined Peter Kilpatrick, president of Catholic University, at the 2024 Potomac Conference on Public Safety.

As Kilpatrick was wrapping up his thoughts, Smith looked over at the panel moderator, Elliot Ferguson, president and CEO of Destination DC. He immediately shook his head, understanding that D.C.’s top police officer had one last thing to say.

“I just want to add one thing. I’m in an environment with private industry business,” Smith said. “One of the things that we’ve launched with the Real Time Crime Center is the ability to be able to connect your cameras.”

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The theme of the panel discussion was “Collaboration for Success: Strategies, Resources, and Trust-Building,” and was in collaboration with the Board of Trade, Council of Governments, the Greater Washington Partnership and the Consortium of Universities.

During the roughly 40-minute talk, both Smith and Metro Transit Chief Michael Anzallo spoke of how the crime rates have dropped during this calendar year.

Smith said, to date, the Metropolitan Police Department has nearly 40,000 cameras that are connected to the Real Time Crime Center through CameraConnect D.C.

“We are asking you, your partners, your business, please connect your cameras to our Real Time Crime Center,” Smith said. “If you have business, mom-and-pop stores, we really want to use your cameras.”

Afterward, Smith spoke to WTOP and made another appeal to business owners.

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“Please, please, please, allow the Metropolitan Police Department to have access to those cameras,” Smith said. “It helps us move into the area quicker and make the appropriate arrests of those individuals who are creating havoc in our city.”

Smith also spoke of the crime drop that the District has seen since January.

“We’ve had a 30% reduction in violent crime, 31% reduction in robberies. We’ve seen a very, very good decrease in carjackings at 47%,” Smith said. “We know we still have work to do, but we have to keep pushing.”

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© 2024 WTOP. All Rights Reserved. This website is not intended for users located within the European Economic Area.

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Washington, D.C

Historic DC church for sale in Dupont Circle at $5M asking price – WTOP News

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Historic DC church for sale in Dupont Circle at $5M asking price – WTOP News


Since 1894, the Church of the Holy City has called D.C.’s 16th Street NW home. Soon, that is going to change.

Since 1894, the Church of the Holy City has called D.C.’s 16th Street NW home.
(Courtesy HD Bros Real Estate Photography)

Courtesy HD Bros Real Estate Photography

Church of the Holy City in Northwest D.C.
The beautiful church is hard to miss as you drive around the Dupont Circle area of 16th Street NW.
(Courtesy HD Bros Real Estate Photography)

Courtesy HD Bros Real Estate Photography

Since 1894, the Church of the Holy City has called D.C.’s 16th Street NW home.
(WTOP/Jimmy Alexander)

WTOP/Jimmy Alexander

The church has a distinguishable red door.
(WTOP/Jimmy Alexander)

WTOP/Jimmy Alexander

The church has 44-foot high ceilings, perfect for an echoing organ.
(Courtesy HD Bros Real Estate Photography)

Courtesy HD Bros Real Estate Photography

The church has 44-foot high ceilings, perfect for an echoing organ.
(Courtesy HD Bros Real Estate Photography)

Courtesy HD Bros Real Estate Photography

A Tiffany Studios stained glass window in the church depicts the Archangel Raphael.
(Courtesy HD Bros Real Estate Photography)

Courtesy HD Bros Real Estate Photography

The gothic revival church was built by two prominent architects, including Paul Pelz, who was the main architect of the Library of Congress.
(Courtesy HD Bros Real Estate Photography)

Courtesy HD Bros Real Estate Photography

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Since 1894, the Church of the Holy City has called D.C.’s 16th Street NW home.

Soon, that is going to change. This week, the historic church was put on the market for the asking price of $5 million.

The gothic revival church was built by two prominent architects, including Paul Pelz, who was the main architect of the Library of Congress.

“It’s still an active Swedenborgianism church,” said real estate agent Bo Billups with Sotheby’s International. “The congregation is much smaller and they are moving to a more appropriate place that is more in line with their needs.”

The beautiful church is hard to miss as you drive around the Dupont Circle area of 16th Street NW.

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While it is quite close to the bars and restaurants on 17th Street NW, there is no chance that the Church of the Holy City will turn into Washington, D.C.’s newest hot nightlife spot.

“That zoning does not include restaurants and certainly not a bar,” said Billups.

The church is over 16,000 square feet, and the real estate agent described it as awe inspiring.

“These interior spaces, 44-feet high,” said Billups. “The stained glass, including one from Tiffany, the stone inside, the woodwork. It’s a beautiful place.”

Since the church was put on the market on Tuesday, Billups has heard from 20 potential buyers.

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“A majority are developers, investors who are considering different uses for it,” said Billups. “Certainly, residential development. We do have conceptual plans from Bonstra Haresign architects.”

Incredibly, Billups did hear from someone that looked at the church as a possible single-family home.

If you do decide to shell out $5 million for this home, there are some things you need to know before you move in.

The church does have four half bathrooms, but no full bathroom or kitchens.

One feature the church does have is worth its weight in gold when you are looking for a parking spot in Dupont.

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“It has a driveway and five-car parking,” said Billups. “In Dupont, that close to downtown for that surface space, it’s worth $40-50,000, maybe more.”

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© 2024 WTOP. All Rights Reserved. This website is not intended for users located within the European Economic Area.



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Washington, D.C

DC Health officials warn of measles exposures in the District

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DC Health officials warn of measles exposures in the District


WASHINGTON (DC News Now) — Health officials in the District are investigating a potential measles outbreak in Northwest D.C.

An infected individual visited multiple locations in D.C. while contagious. DC Health released the alert just hours after a similar warning was issued in Arlington.

Listed below are the dates, times, and locations of the potential exposure sites associated with this case of measles:

  • CVS Pharmacy: 2226 Wisconsin Ave. NW, Washington D.C. between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. Tuesday, July 2.
  • LabCorp: 2233 Wisconsin Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. Tuesday, July 2.

DC Health warned that measles is a highly contagious illness that spreads easily through the air when an infected person breathes, coughs or sneezes.

Symptoms usually appear in two stages:

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Stage 1: People have a fever of over 101 degrees, runny rose, watery red eyes and a cough. These symptoms usually start between one to two weeks after being exposed.

Stage 2: A rash begins to appear on the face and spread to the body beginning three to five days after symptoms start. People with measles are contagious from four days before the rash appears through four days after the rash appears.

If you have not received a measles vaccine, you may be at risk of contracting the illness.

Anyone who was exposed and is at risk of developing measles should be on the lookout for symptoms until July 23, 2024.

If you notice symptoms, immediately isolate yourself by staying home and away from others, and contact your healthcare provider right away.

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You should call ahead before going to your healthcare provider’s office or the emergency room to notify them you might have been exposed to measles and ask them to call the health department.

DC Health issued the following tips for those who might have been exposed:

  • If you have received two doses of a measles-containing vaccine or were born before 1957, you are protected and do not need to take any action.
  • If you have received only one dose of a measles-containing vaccine, you are very likely to be protected and your risk of being infected with measles from any of these exposures is very low. However, to achieve complete immunity, contact your healthcare provider about getting a second vaccine dose.
  • If you have an immunocompromising condition, please consult with your healthcare provider if you have questions or develop symptoms.

DC Health said that infants younger than a year old are susceptible to infection if they have been exposed.

If you or your child have not yet been vaccinated, you are asked to call DC Health or a healthcare provider to get the first of two doses as soon as possible. To check your immunization status, you can call your healthcare provider or contact DC Health.

You should contact DC Health to report any suspected cases and arrange for public health testing. Suspected cases can be reported by healthcare providers at 844-493-2652 or by submitting a Notifiable Disease and Condition Case Report Form online using the DC Reporting and Surveillance Center (DCRC), which can be found on DC Health’s Infectious Diseases website.

If you have any questions about these potential exposures, you can contact DC Health at 844-493-2652 or via email at doh.epi@dc.gov.

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Washington, D.C

Measles exposure possible in D.C. and Arlington, officials say

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Measles exposure possible in D.C. and Arlington, officials say


Someone with a contagious case of measles visited sites in Arlington and the District on successive days this month, and health officials in the two jurisdictions notified people Friday night who might have been exposed.

Arlington said it was notified of a person from “another state” who visited the suburb in Northern Virginia while contagious. According to the District, a contagious person visited two places in D.C. the day after the Arlington visit. D.C. officials did not say where the person was from.

Although officials in the two jurisdictions did not immediately say that the same person was involved in both cases, the timing of the visits and their proximity suggest that possibility.

Arlington’s health department said it was acting “out of an abundance of caution” in notifying people who were at the site in Arlington that they may have been exposed.

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The department identified the site as the Harris Teeter store at 624B N. Glebe Rd. It gave the date and time of the possible exposure as Monday, July 1, between noon and 4 p.m.

District health officials gave the sites and times of possible exposure as follows:

  • CVS Pharmacy: 2226 Wisconsin Ave. NW, between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. on Tuesday, July 2.
  • LabCorp: 2233 Wisconsin Ave. NW, between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. on Tuesday, July 2.

The Arlington and D.C. sites are within half a dozen miles of each other.

Measles is highly contagious and can spread easily through the air when an infected person breathes, coughs or sneezes, the two localities’ health departments said.

They said symptoms show up in two stages. The first usually starts seven to 10 days after exposure and is associated with a fever of above 101 degrees along with runny nose; red, watery eyes; and a cough.

In the second stage, three to five days after the start of symptoms, a rash begins on the face and spreads.

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Contagiousness begins four days before the rash starts and ends four days after.

People who have not been vaccinated may be at risk. Anyone who was exposed and who may be at risk should watch for symptoms until July 22, according to Arlington, and until July 23, according to the District.

If symptoms are noticed, people should call their health-care provider immediately and isolate themselves.

They should call before going to a treatment site to allow for precautions, officials said.



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