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TCSO hosts active shooter training for agencies across Oklahoma

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TCSO hosts active shooter training for agencies across Oklahoma


TULSA, Okla. — The Tulsa County Sheriff’s Office hosted an active shooter training session for several law enforcement agencies across the state to better equip first responders in an emergency.

“If we are going to make a mistake, let’s make it here because when it is real life, and real counting, seconds matter and we are trying to eliminate all those mistakes for them,” Chris Polito, a Louisiana State University National Center for Biomedical Research and Training instructor, said.

Polito said officers are trained to stop at nothing to eliminate the threat.

“Everyone here raised their hand and swore,” Polito said. “That’s the day they are actually going to do it. They know there is a possibility they can get hurt. They know there is a possibility that they are not going back to their loved ones, but they put that aside to risk their own lives to save others.”

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Polito said the course teaches active shooter response.

“It’s not just geared toward schools, although we are using a school here, it is anything that there is a large amount of violence that could occur,” he said.

Drills range from sweeping hallways for threats, battering doors and entering with guns drawn, and life-saving measures like tying tourniquets.

Cpl. Daniel Gullett with TCSO said coordinating with other agencies is crucial.

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“We all work in the same areas, and this just improves our response because God forbid if this does happen, a lot of it will be different agencies showing up,” Cpl. Gullett said. “Now we are all on the same page with the training. We know each other’s faces.”

TCSO Active Shooter training 2.jpeg

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Active shooting incidents are seen across the United States. An FBI report on active shooters from 2023 states that 48 shootings were designated as such.

It states 105 people were killed and 139 wounded.

According to the FBI those 48 active shooter incidents took place at five location categories – open space, commerce, education, residence, and health care.

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The report states although incidents decreased by 4% from 2022, the number of active shooter incidents increased by 60% since 2019.

“Violence is out there,” Polito said. “We need to make sure that our law enforcement officers are capable of handling that. They are trained to do it to stop the killing and stop the dying. It’s what we teach and preach.”


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Oklahoma

How Oklahoma QB Jackson Arnold Honed the Mental Side of His Game This Offseason

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How Oklahoma QB Jackson Arnold Honed the Mental Side of His Game This Offseason


DALLAS — The Alamo Bowl is firmly in Jackson Arnold’s rearview. 

Oklahoma’s new starting quarterback worked to improve all throughout the spring as he enters his first year truly at the helm of OU’s offense, and his eyes are locked on the future. 

Arnold flashed plenty of the arm talent that excited coaches around the country during his recruitment in the second and third quarters against Arizona last December, but four turnovers soured his first start. 

Curbing those miscues were the obvious takeaway from the contest, but he had another focus during spring practice to develop into the quarterback Brent Venables and offensive coordinator Seth Littrell hope he can be as a sophomore in 2024. 

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“After that Arizona game, there was a lot of maturing and a lot of growing up that I had to do,” Arnold said at SEC Media Days on Tuesday. “Stepping into that QB1 role, I had to be a real leader for us, for our team, and just stepping into that role, I know I need to mature as a person, as a player too. 

“And the person that I am now and the player that I am now has improved drastically from where I was in that bowl game.”

At the start of bowl practice last year, Arnold admitted the leadership part of his new job was a bit awkward. 

“All those guys had Dillon as their quarterback the whole year,” Arnold said. “It felt like I was taking (Gabriel’s) role from him.”

Those worries are no more. 

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“The biggest part of leadership that I focused on this offseason was being a vocal leader,” Arnold said. “Stepping up through conditioning or working out or whatever, just being vocal for those guys and picking them up. Even if we’re in huddles with each other, just leading those guys, telling them things and how we operate and just showing them the way things are done.”

Growing into a leadership role can take time. 

Danny Stutsman is now so much more than simply OU’s best linebacker. 

He was the heart and soul of the defense in 2023, and is a talismanic piece for the Sooners. 

Stutsman had to learn the hard way just how challenging leading an entire side of the ball can be — something he sees Arnold digesting right now. 

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“It’s difficult for him,” Stutsman said.  Only playing one game last year and having all these expectations thrown onto him. He’s done an amazing job of filling that role and doing whatever it takes. 

“For myself, I look back to my sophomore year, kind of earning that starting spot. It kind of took a while. I thought the guys on the defense kind of were leaders. I realized quickly that someone needs to step into that more vocal role. 

“… Sometimes guys don’t want to be there, and you see it right away. You have to be the person who wakes them up, gets them going. Sometimes that person is myself, and I have to kind of understand like if I come to practice or come to workout and I’m not 110 percent, I’m not the one who’s getting everyone clapping, getting everyone with that energy, then people are going to feed off of that both ways.”

As spring practice broke and made way to summer workouts, Arnold still had his own checklist of improvements on the field. 

He tested his skills against the nation’s other top quarterbacks at the Manning Passing Academy, where he continued to try and hone how to marry his arm strength with a deeper understanding of exactly where the ball needs to go on every play. 

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“I feel like the biggest thing for me after spring ball was attacking the mental side of football,” Arnold said, “whether that’s looking at defenses or how Coach V looks at offenses, getting a defensive perspective of the game. 

“But just really focusing on the mental part of football and just kind of learning different things that will help me ID coverages or help me make better reads for the season.”

The true test for Arnold will come in September when the Sooners open up SEC play against Tennesse and then close the month with a trip to Auburn. 

His development will go a long way in determining Oklahoma’s fate in 2024. 

But as the Sooners prepare to open training camp at the end of the month, it’s clear he’s taken the necessary strides off the field to lead OU on it this year. 

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“I think Jackson is starting to understand that and trying to do everything he can to be turned into that leader,” Stutsman said. 



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USS Oklahoma Seaman laid to rest in Grifton after 83 years

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USS Oklahoma Seaman laid to rest in Grifton after 83 years


GRIFTON, N.C. (WITN) – A Navy seaman was finally laid to rest after being unidentifiable for the past 83 years.

On December 7, 1941, Japanese naval and air forces attacked Pearl Harbor, leaving thousands dead and many lost, including sailor Joseph C. Rouse.

Dozens of people gathered at Riverside Christian Churchyard in Grifton to visit the hometown and burial site of Joseph C. Rouse.

His family says he was a Seaman First Class aboard the USS Oklahoma during the attack on Pearl Harbor. The USS Oklahoma was destroyed, and many sailors were tragically trapped below the deck.

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Two years after the attack, Rouse and many others were considered unidentifiable and were buried in Hawaii.

Even though he has no immediate family, he does have over 20 nieces and nephews who grew up listening to stories about him. His niece says her mother never stopped looking for him.

“At the age of 83, she was contacted by the US Department of Defense to donate DNA for possible matches to unknown remains. My mother was gleeful. She could have done cartwheels. She was convinced, “Oh, now, now it’s going to happen. They’re bringing Joseph home” says Gwen Clark.

US Navy Admiral John Robinson, who drove from the Pentagon in Washington DC was also present to show his respect for Rouse.

“The military is committed to not leaving anyone behind. We are committed to a full accounting of our servicemen and women. This was truly an example of that. It can take many, many years, but we are completely committed to bringing everyone home” says US Navy Admiral John Robinson.

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Seaman first class is a former rank that no longer exists in the Navy today.

For more information on Joseph C. Rouse click here



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Oklahoma Indian Clinic Celebrates 50 Years

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Oklahoma Indian Clinic Celebrates 50 Years


Saturday the Oklahoma Indian Clinic celebrated its 50-year anniversary.

Since opening its doors 50 years ago, the clinic has seen tremendous growth.

“To watch the growth and be a part of it is so overwhelming that I don’t even know how to articulate it. ” Said Robyn Sunday Allen, CEO of OKC Indian Clinic.

Since 1995 the clinic has gained over 15, thousand patients.

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“We had about 5000 patients in 1995, and we were an old dilapidated building downtown. Today we have 400 employees, we’re in 150,000 square feet of space with 22,000 patients,” said Sunday-Allen.

In 1974 the clinic opened with a few dozen patients and employees.

A long-time employee Robin Parker says it’s grown beyond the founder’s wildest dreams.

As they celebrate 50 years, the CEO continues to look ahead.

“It absolutely is a celebration of where we were in our humble beginnings and then what we aspire to be,” said Sunday-Allen.

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