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MM 5.16: Maryland men’s basketball set to host Marquette in 2024-25 season

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MM 5.16: Maryland men’s basketball set to host Marquette in 2024-25 season


Maryland men’s basketball announced a home-and-home series with Marquette Wednesday. The Terps will host the Golden Eagles on Nov. 15, 2024, and then travel to Milwaukee during the 2025-26 season.

November will mark just the second time the two programs have met, with Maryland winning the first matchup, 84-63, in 2019 to win the Orlando Championship.

Marquette ended the 2023-24 campaign ranked No. 12 in the AP Top 25 poll and slotted as a No. 2-seed in the NCAA Tournament, but ultimately lost to N.C. State in the Sweet 16.

Meanwhile, Maryland completely missed the NCAA Tournament after a disappointing season, finishing with a 16-17 record.

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Maryland already announced another nonconference game for this season against Villanova in the Saatva Empire Classic at the Prudential Center in Newark, New Jersey, on Nov. 24, 2024.

In other news

Ben Messinger previewed Maryland baseball’s weekend series against Penn State.

Messinger also analyzed Maryland baseball’s offensive struggles following the loss of last year’s stars.

Maryland softball’s Courtney Wyche earned a Big Ten All-Tournament team selection.

Maryland baseball moved the start time for Thursday’s game against Penn State up to 4 p.m.

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No. 6-seed Maryland men’s lacrosse advances to national championship game with 12-6 win over No. 7-seed Virginia

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No. 6-seed Maryland men’s lacrosse advances to national championship game with 12-6 win over No. 7-seed Virginia


PHILADELPHIA — The fourth faceoff of Maryland men’s lacrosse’s NCAA Tournament semifinal match against Virginia turned into an all-out scrap for a ground ball. Daniel Maltz briefly came up with it, but he instantly had it knocked out of his stick.

It looked like Virginia won its first faceoff of the day, but the referees blew their whistles and signaled toward Maryland’s bench, as head coach John Tillman called a timeout. Showing an uncharacteristic burst of emotion, Tillman came out to greet his players, pumping his fists.

The timeout helped secure Luke Wierman’s fourth faceoff win of the game, all of which were crucial in building the Terps’ early lead, one they would not relinquish.

Almost 50 minutes later, Tillman was on the field with the rest of the team celebrating a 12-6 win and his eighth national championship game appearance in just 13 seasons as the Terps’ head coach.

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Maryland rolled past Virginia on Saturday behind a physically dominate defensive effort and another fantastic game from Wierman at the faceoff X, as he won 15-of-22 attempts.

“Jesse’s [Bernhardt] defensive game plan, I thought, was great, and these guys executed it extremely well,” Tillman said. “And then offensively just to get off to such a good start. I felt like Luke [Wierman] did a tremendous job at the X.”

The Terps will now take on No. 1-seed Notre Dame in the national championship game on Monday.

Nothing says Memorial Day weekend lacrosse more then two of the most highly-touted seniors in the country matched up against each other. It took less than a minute for the raucous Philadelphia crowd to get a dose of just that. Virginia’s Connor Shellenberger had defenseman Ajax Zappitello behind the cage, got about half a step on him and then fired a Lyle Thompson-esque backhand past Logan McNaney into the top corner of the net.

That was Virginia’s only goal of the opening quarter, though.

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Wierman picked up right where he left off against Duke, winning the game’s first five opening faceoffs, demonstrating his impressive clamp speed.

Throughout the season, Maryland’s offense has struggled to take advantage of early possessions, but not this time. The ball moved cleanly through a sea of Virginia’s white jerseys, as the Terps found the back of the net four times.

Daniel Kelly, who has excelled since moving into a starting attack spot in early April, scored twice out of unsettled situations, finishing low both times. Additionally, Matlz got free off a cut and Wierman provided a huge boost with an instant goal off a faceoff win.

Trailing 4-1, Virginia, who hadn’t scored since the opening minute, needed some offense to kick-start the second quarter, and got it. Joey Terenzi caught a pass as he trailed behind the play and unleashed a rocket past McNaney to bring the Cavaliers back within two goals.

Maryland had a response ready, though, as Zach Whittier found Maltz for his second goal, and about three minutes later, Eric Spanos found Kelly right in the grill of Kyle Morris, who drew the start at goalie for Virginia after Matt Nunes’ continued struggles.

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The Terps and Cavaliers traded a goal apiece before the break, with the Terps getting another in transition from defenseman Colin Burlace, which helped secure a 7-3 halftime lead.

“Everybody loves Colin, you know,” Tillman said, “when you get a goal from somebody that’s a little unlikely, it does go a long way.”

Maryland’s defensive unit allowed Virginia to put just six shots on McNaney the entire half.

“We just couldn’t create slides today against that team defense consistently,” Virginia head coach Lars Tiffany said. “… When a defense doesn’t have to slide, they don’t have to worry about holding spots or playing sides.”

The Terps didn’t let the halftime intermission kill their momentum, as they stormed out of the break with two more goals. One from Spanos on a cut from the back of the cage and another from Jack Koras, who beat his defender.

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Virginia struggled to get good looks and failed to score on McNaney, who finished the game with eight saves, when it did. Conversely, the Terps continued to produce solid attempts as Ryan Siracusa got his first goal of the game and Spanos doubled his tally.

Maryland spent much of the fourth quarter killing the clock. Virginia added two more goals, though, as Payton Cormier, who spent most of the game being blanketed by Burlace, finally got free for a goal and McCabe Millon found his second.

Jack Brennan found the back of the net for the second week in a row, scoring Maryland’s 12th and final goal of the day.

Three Things to Know

1. The Terps exacted revenge. Virginia overpowered Maryland, 14-10, in College Park earlier this season, during which it looked like the far superior team. The Terps proved otherwise on Saturday, though, holding Virginia’s potent offense to eight less goals and scoring double-digit goals for the third consecutive game.

2. Notre Dame rematch set. After an already successful postseason — relative to pre-postseason expectations — Maryland has the opportunity to win its second national championship in the last three seasons, but the Terps are staring down an extremely tall task in Notre Dame. The Fighting Irish beat them, 14-9, in South Bend, Indiana early this year.

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“Everything is good,” Tillman said of the Fighting Irish. “They have the best goalie in the country, arguably … they have a great faceoff guy [and] their defense is tremendous.”

3. Maryland’s leaders shined. McNaney made eight saves, Wierman went 15-for-22 on faceoffs, Zappitello caused three turnovers and Maltz and Kelly combined for five goals. Tillman talked about leaning on his senior leaders heading into the game, and they showed up against Virginia.

“You know, we lost a lot of guys over the last couple of years,” Wierman said. “We just needed to keep chipping away and really sticking together.”



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Local Business Spotlight: Live Arts Maryland

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Local Business Spotlight: Live Arts Maryland


The arts are alive in Anne Arundel County and Annapolis. J. Ernest “Ernie” Green has been at the forefront for many years as the Conductor and the Musical Director of Live Arts Maryland!

From the Annapolis Chorale to the Chamber Orchestra we have all come to know and love the work of the talented people in our community! Each season brings exciting and new music along with some of our favorites–can you say Handel’s Messiah at St. Anne’s Episcopal Church? Broadway to rock and roll–there’s a good chance you can see it all at one of their performance venues– St. Anne’s Episcopal Church, Maryland Hall, or in their own Studio at the Annapolis Mall (not far from the Container Store, Library, and SPCA’s Paws at the Mall).

If you have not witnessed Live Arts Maryland, you are missing out. And if you get a chance to sit down with Ernie over a beer or a cup of coffee–do it. But for now…

Have a listen!

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Gov. Moore vetoes four bills, lets audiologist bill become law without his signature – WTOP News

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Gov. Moore vetoes four bills, lets audiologist bill become law without his signature – WTOP News


Press association beats back public notice bill it missed during the 2024 session.

This article was republished with permission from WTOP’s news partners at Maryland Matters. Sign up for Maryland Matters’ free email subscription today.

A bill that would have curbed some public notice advertising revenue for newspapers in Maryland has been vetoed by Gov. Wes Moore (D).

House Bill 1258 was one of four from the 2024 legislative session vetoed by Moore. Two others — identical House and Senate bills expanding the scope of work audiologists can do — were allowed to go into law without the signature of the governor.

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All the actions announced Friday were expected.

In vetoing the public notice bill, Moore cited concerns about “ensuring the existence of thriving independent local media.”

HB 1258, sponsored by Del. Elizabeth Embry (D-Baltimore City), would have ended the requirement that public notice on estates be placed in newspapers around the state, allowing them instead to be published on a central website created by the state’s registers of wills.

The bill was overlooked by newspapers and media organizations who have fought off similar bills over the years. Those same groups launched a lobbying effort after the session to secure Moore’s veto.

Rebecca Snyder, executive director of the Maryland-Delaware-DC Press Association, said the veto “underscores Gov. Moore’s acknowledgment of the role of news media and how important our watchdog function is — not only the investigative work that that news media is known for but also the public notice and public records that are a really important way to hold government people in power accountable.

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“We understand that this is part of a broader conversation, and we’re willing, certainly, to work with other stakeholders on this. But we are really happy to have seen, kind of, the fruits of our advocacy come to pass,” Snyder said.

The press association, which represents newspapers in the state, said the move would end a practice of independence and transparency. It also would have hit the flagging industry in its pocketbook, a fact noted by Moore.

“The press also plays an important role in public accountability through investigative journalism,” Moore wrote in his veto letter. “Public notice requirements have helped sustain much of the local print media in Maryland as print advertising dollars have dried up and the entire print media industry has consolidated and downsized.

“Many communities in the state now suffer from a lack of press coverage of local news, undermining public accountability. To so rapidly remove such a large source of advertising revenue as estate notices without considering the impact on the future of local media in Maryland could have severe consequences,” he wrote.

Even so, the governor said changes and technology and cost savings for local governments and families should not be ignored. Moore said lawmakers were not given the opportunity to “balance these two significant public interests.”

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Supporters said the bill would have saved estates and families money.

Moore agreed. In his veto letter, he said that “existing print public notice requirements do present a financial burden on local and state governments as well as individual citizens.”

“This is the challenge that Delegate Embry was seeking to address,” the letter said.

Moore wrote that the costs to estates are an important concern “and one that should be dealt with.”

Moore vetoes three other bills

Senate Bill 60 would have authorized out-of-state dealers to temporarily display motor homes, recreational vehicles and trailers at shows around the state. The out-of-state dealers could not take orders nor accept deposits under the measure.

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The bill also would have required the Department of Commerce to conduct a study on the impact of out-of-state dealers at the Maryland RV show held at the Maryland State Fairgrounds in Timonium.

Sen. Mary Beth Carozza (R-Eastern Shore), lead sponsor of the bill, said the goal was to bolster local RV shows while protecting businesses licensed in the state.

Moore said he rejected the “well-intentioned bill” to protect Maryland jobs.

“Maryland’s recreational vehicle industry is made up of small businesses who employ a total of more than 300 employees statewide,” Moore wrote. “As with many of the small businesses that propel our economy and further opportunities for families in the state, a consistent and reliable marketplace is crucial. Senate Bill 60, as passed, creates a significant and temporary shift in the marketplace for RV dealers with unknown impacts.”

Senate Bill 380 would have created a 21-member workgroup to examine efforts to recruit and retain police officers around the state. Moore vetoed the bill saying it duplicated other efforts.

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“It is not necessary to create two workgroups designed to address the same problem,” he wrote.

Senate Bill 693 was identical to a House bill Moore signed May 9, authorizing Carroll County government to borrow $28.9 million through bonds for projects within the county. The governor vetoed the Senate version, saying that “enactment of duplicate bond bills would double authorized debt.”

Audiologist bill becomes law, needs more work

Moore, as expected, allowed identical bills — HB 464 and SB 795 — to become law without his signature.

The bills allow licensed audiologists to diagnose and treat auditory conditions; sell, dispense, and fit hearing aids and external portions of cochlear implant devices; perform ear cleaning; and order blood work and tests as it relates to auditory conditions.

MedChi, the Maryland State Medical Society, opposed the bill that it said “vastly expanded” the work of audiologists.

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“I acknowledge and commend the General Assembly, particularly the Finance and Health and Government Operations Committees for their work with advocates to authorize audiologists to practice to the full extent of their training and provide appropriate access to care for Marylanders,” Moore wrote. “However, discussions with proponents and opponents of the bill have made clear that the statute will require further clarification.”

Moore, in his letter, recommended proponents and opponents “collaborate on revisiting these statutes during the interim to ensure that the differences between audiology and otolaryngology are made more clear.”

MedChi CEO Gene Ransom said Friday that his organization “obviously is pleased that Gov. Moore addressed the desire to fix the problem that we identified. We’re looking forward to working with the administration and the General Assembly to make the bill workable.”



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