Connect with us

Austin, TX

Texas State Parks provide free campsites to Beryl evacuees

Published

on

Texas State Parks provide free campsites to Beryl evacuees


AUSTIN, Texas — Although Hurricane Beryl has weakened significantly and moved out of Texas, the destruction it left will take weeks to clean up. Many people have been forced out of their homes for the time being.

However, Texas Parks and Wildlife Department has stepped up to help those who had to evacuate because of the storm.

TPWD will provide free Texas state park campsites outside the affected area to evacuees fleeing the storm. Evacuees can check the Texas State Parks Alert Map to see which sites are open for visitors. At this time, free entry applies to campsites only and does not include day-use sites, cabins or lodges.

TPWD will maintain normal state park rules and regulations for evacuees and their animals. Please visit the Texas Register website for the full list.

Advertisement



Source link

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Austin, TX

‘An extension of who we are.’ Texas lowriders cruise with pride in family, Latino culture

Published

on

‘An extension of who we are.’ Texas lowriders cruise with pride in family, Latino culture


Austin lowrider Steve Guzman bought his first rig, a candy-apple red Chevy pickup, when he was 22. He’d just come home from serving in Vietnam. Back then, Guzman said, Austin’s lowriders fought bitterly. 

His friend, Manuel Medina, lived in Montopolis, across the river from Guzman’s East Austin neighborhood. Neither would drive across the bridge.

“We had different parts of town,” said Austin rider James Sanchez, and the attitude was, “Don’t come to my side.”

Advertisement

But as Guzman, Medina and Sanchez grew older, Austin’s lowriding scene began to change. The bridge’s boundary grew porous. Families married across the river. As pride in their cars had once kept the neighborhoods apart, the art of lowriding brought them together. 

“Time has healed,” Guzman said. 

The gray in his beard reflected colors from lowriders parked nearby. Today, Guzman, Medina and Sanchez are members of the old guard. Their pride lies as much in their cars as in the next generation of lowriders who, they hope, will inherit them. 

Advertisement

Lowrider clubs proliferated in Texas in the 1960s

On a recent Sunday, lowriders from across Austin and throughout Texas cruised through the capital to celebrate the uniquely Latino tradition. Their rally point was a new exhibit at the Bullock Texas State History Museum.

More: Five reasons to visit the Bullock Museum’s lowriding ‘Carros y Cultura’ exhibit

The exhibit, called “Carros y Cultura,” celebrates Texas lowriders: the art, culture and people.

Lowriding’s origins lie in 1940s California, where the elaborately decorated cars arose as an expression of Latino pride. The culture came to Texas about 20 years later. 

Advertisement

That’s when Austinites, like Steve Guzman’s grandfather, first started putting bags of cement in the trunks of their cars to get closer to the pavement. 

Now, there are close to 100 lowrider clubs in Austin alone, Guzman estimated. 

‘Never did we dream that we would be at the Bob Bullock museum’

About 70 riders from as many as 30 clubs came to show their cars on Sunday, cruising past the Bullock museum, around the Capitol, down South Congress Avenue and across the bridge. Then they posted at Fiesta Gardens’ Chicano Park, in Austin’s Holly neighborhood, to party.  

Lowriders of every shape and size cruised the streets: some richly ornamented, some glowing. Others rolled down South Congress with one wheel cocked high in the air: a maneuver known as “three wheel motion.”

Advertisement

The celebration grew as a way to take “Carros y Cultura” back to the streets, said an adviser for the show, Monica Maldonado. 

Maldonado is the founder of MAS Cultura, a nonprofit dedicated to uplifting Austin’s Latino community through art. Lowriding, she said, was one of her first inspirations.  

“But never did we dream that we would be at the Bob Bullock museum,” she said just before the cruise. A bubble-gum pink lowrider slipped past. Maybe it was the bright sun, reflecting off its paint, but tears began to well in Maldonado’s eyes. 

“I’m here. I’m an Austin native, and to see our culture celebrated and bringing everyone together — there’s really no words for it,” she said, blotting her eyes.

Advertisement

Portraits of families rendered in paint and chrome

Each lowrider tells a story with their car. Many are passed down through generations as family heirlooms: symbols of dedication and reminders of the beauty in perseverance. 

“West Texas” Eddie Velarde, a member of the Majestix Car Club’s San Antonio chapter, has been restoring his 1987 Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme for 18 years. 

When he bought the car, his daughter, Selena, was just 6 months old. This year, she graduated from high school. Velarde hopes she’ll inherit the lowrider when he dies, he said, as a memory of his hard work. 

“I look at this car, and it’s a symbol of times when bills went unpaid, when money was short. Life was hard, but we made it.” Velarde said, running his hand over a portrait of his daughter painted on the Oldsmobile’s trunk. 

Advertisement

Paintings of Velarde’s mother, father and wife adorn other panels. He’s dedicated the car to his family, he said: “It’s an extension of who we are.”

Like Velarde, longtime Austin rider Trampia Guzman grew up “in the life,” he said: “I was born to it.”

When Trampia Guzman’s father followed work to fields in the Northeast, he’d call home, asking his young son to rotate the tires on his car. Lowriding was a way of life for them. 

‘This is an art, and it’s miraculous’

The art gave rise to other creations. 

Advertisement

Trampia Guzman’s grandmother taught him to sew when he was 5. He started making zoot suits, a uniquely baggy and square cut style that began among Chicanos from El Paso in the ‘40s. 

Now two of Trampia Guzman’s suits are on display in the Bullock museum’s lowrider exhibit. One of them, cut from shining gold cloth, he made as a memorial to his grandmother. The material came from a set of drapes that had hung in her home all of his life. 

He admired the cloth as a boy, he said: His memory of his grandmother had always been sitting in a chair in front of the golden drapes. Now, he wears the suit each year on the anniversary of her death. 

Stories of love and dedication spring from the lowriders. 

Advertisement

Trampia Guzman’s wife bought him one to restore on their 20th wedding anniversary. He said he cried when he saw the car taken apart for painting; he was so overwhelmed. His friend, who goes simply by “Gizmo,” helped him paint the car.

“This is an art, and it’s miraculous,” Gizmo said, turning his head with a grin. “You see that red car over there?”

He pointed to a pearlescent cherry cruiser, sitting low to the ground. 

“That one got struck by lightning. It almost burnt all the way down, but we saved it.”

Advertisement



Source link

Continue Reading

Austin, TX

University of Texas, Texas A&M, and SMU Swimmers Pick Up Wins on Day 2 of Austin Sectionals

Published

on

University of Texas, Texas A&M, and SMU Swimmers Pick Up Wins on Day 2 of Austin Sectionals


2024 AUSTIN SECTIONALS

  • July 11-14
  • Lee & Joe Jamail Texas Swim Center
  • LCM (50 meters)
  • Results on MeetMobile: “2024 ST TXLA SZ LC Sectional Champs”
  • Day 1 Recap

Austin Sectionals continued on Friday night with more dominant performances from University of Texas, Texas A&M, and SMU swimmers who missed out on qualifying for the U.S. Olympic team last month.

Rising Texas sophomore Emma Kern began the session with a personal-best 100 backstroke time of 1:00.41 to beat classmate Berit Berglund (1:02.39), the reigning Big 12 champion in the SCY version of the event. The 19-year-old Kern shaved just over a tenth off her previous-best 1:00.54 from prelims at last month’s Olympic Trials, where she ultimately placed 16th (1:00.98). Berglund has been as fast as 1:00.23 back in 2022.

Rising Texas sophomore Will Modglin cruised to victory in the men’s 100 backstroke at 54.02, within half a second of his lifetime best from last month’s Olympic Trials prelims (53.59). The reigning Big 12 champion touched more than a second ahead of recent Texas A&M graduate Thomas Shomper (55.07) and rising Texas sophomore Nate Germonprez (55.61). Modglin placed 6th at Olympic Trials in 53.69.

Chloe Stepanek was in a league of her own in the women’s 200 free with a win in 2:00.64, almost four seconds ahead of Streamline Aquatics 16-year-old Averie Hager (2:04.16). The 22-year-old Stepanek placed 16th in the 200 free semifinals at Olympic Trials last month (2:00.02), still more than a second off her personal-best 1:58.73 from last November. A recent Texas A&M graduate, Stepanek is currently in the NCAA transfer portal seeking a destination for her fifth year of collegiate eligibility. Hager dropped more than half a second off her previous-best 2:04.77 en route to the runner-up finish.

Rising SMU junior Jack Forrest captured the men’s 200 free crown in 1:50.85, not far off his best time from May (1:50.03). The 20-year-old held off Bucky Gettys (1:51.66), who dropped almost two seconds on his way to 2nd place. Forrest finished 53rd in the 400 free (3:58.58) at Olympic Trials last month while Gettys placed 28th in the 800 free (8:07.12) and 27th in the 1500 free (15:35.91).

Advertisement

The women’s 400 IM title went to 18-year-old Jillian Cox, who dropped almost 20 seconds to earn the victory in 4:51.64. Her best time before today stood at 5:11.06 from way back in 2019. With splits of 1:04.36 fly, 1:15.24 back, 1:29.04 breast, and 1:03.00 free, Cox’s new lifetime best would have placed 23rd at Trials last month. The 18-year-old redshirt freshman placed 3rd in both the 400 free (4:06.89) and 800 free (8:22.97) at Trials last month after placing 6th in the 800 free (8:19.73) at last year’s World Championships.

Amelia Bodenstab reached the wall more than 11 seconds behind Cox in the 800 at 5:02.81, an impressive performance for her first-ever LCM 400 IM. The 18-year-old is headed to Louisville this fall.

Rising Texas junior Sasha Lyubavskiy secured the men’s 400 IM win in 4:31.78, more than three seconds faster than the Russian’s previous-best 4:34.96 from 2021. The 20-year-old eked past Waterloo Swimming 18-year-old Andres Brooks (4:31.79) by the slimmest of margins. Brooks also dropped a few seconds off his previous-best 4:34.76 from April.





Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Austin, TX

Hurricane Beryl is gone, but political storms remain: This Week in Texas Politics

Published

on

Hurricane Beryl is gone, but political storms remain: This Week in Texas Politics


A lot of political headlines this week in Texas were overshadowed by Hurricane Beryl and the power crisis in Houston the storm left behind. But that’s not to say some political storms didn’t spin up. 

Advertisement

FOX 7 Austin’s Chief Political Reporter Rudy Koski and our panel of analyst take a look at This Week in Texas Politics.

RUDY KOSKI: This week in Texas politics, we saw a hurricane get political, and a state House committee chairman accused the Attorney General of blowing hot air. Let’s get the headlines from our panel, and we’ll start first with Brian Smith from Saint Edward’s University. Brian, what’s your headline for the week. 

BRIAN SMITH: After serving as acting governor? Does Dan Patrick want the job full time? 

Advertisement

RUDY KOSKI: Brad Johnson with the Texan News. What’s your headline for the week? 

BRAD JOHNSON: Literal and political hurricanes hit Texas. 

Advertisement

RUDY KOSKI: And political analyst Mark Wiggins. Your headline? 

MARK WIGGINS: Is the dam breaking on Biden’s candidacy? 

RUDY KOSKI: Attorney General Ken Paxton this week claimed that his enemies at the state House are planning an impeachment redo. But the chairman of the House General Investigation Committee, Andrew Murr, called Paxton’s claim a “farfetched fantasy,” and the hearing next week is on an unrelated matter. Brad, you were monitoring this situation. What’s your take? 

BRAD JOHNSON: It’s a lot of smoke and mirrors. There’s absolutely nothing of the belief that it’s about Paxton. The committee announced it was going to meet earlier this month. Set for next week. There are a few, standing tasks in front of the committee, and it’s going to be one of those things that they address. But this is a political move by Paxton. You know, it comes alongside the federal probe, going on with the grand jury right now. But it’s a good move. Political move on his part. You know, either he gets to say we caught you guys, and you, you called an audible, or we caught you guys, and you still went forward with it. 

Advertisement

RUDY KOSKI: There was a lot of huffing and puffing over a bill that was filed by Texas Congressman Chip Roy that says non-citizens cannot vote in federal elections. Now, that already is the law. But it gets a little fuzzy when it comes down to registering to vote. The bill is targeted for a presidential veto, but there’s a lot of Democrats now on the record against this idea. So, Brian, did the GOP just score win regardless of what happens to that bill? 

BRIAN SMITH: Well, we know Immigration’s going to be a huge issue. The Democrats now, 198 Democrats, I think, are on the record saying they voted against it. But legitimately, we’re right back where we started. 

Advertisement

RUDY KOSKI: Dallas congress woman Jasmine Crockett joined the effort by squad leader AOC to impeach conservative Supreme Court Judges Thomas and Alito. You know, a snowball forming in Houston right now seems to have a better chance than that effort. So what’s the benefit, Mark by, you know, being the first Texas Democrat to join on this effort? 

MARK WIGGINS: Yeah. You’re right. I mean, it is going nowhere. But they’re wanting to highlight the very real and very gross ethical compromises that have plagued the court. I mean, Justices receiving millions of dollars and gifts, yachts from people with business before the court. And to this day, the court has done nothing to police itself. 

RUDY KOSKI: A new political poll has come out by the University of Houston. The Trump campaign still has a nine point lead on Team Biden. There’s no bump by the trials. There’s no bump from the big debate that took place. And no bump for RFK Jr, who was hoping to get at least a blip out of this. So, Brad, are you surprised by that? Or are you more surprised that, you know, Collin Allred has kind of has closed the gap on Ted Cruz? 

BRAD JOHNSON: But I think the biggest takeaway here is already undecided. Numbers are pretty high and remain pretty high. So that’s ground to gain for him, but also ground to lose. 

Advertisement

BRIAN SMITH: From this poll his best takeaway is this, he has the highest favorables of any candidate. Meaning when you look at the difference between people who hate you, people who love you, he’s actually at a positive. We’re most of our candidates here in Texas are negative. 

MARK WIGGINS: You know, I think what we’re looking at is most Texans still don’t know who Colin Allred is. I’d suggest that the poll results here are more reflective of where Texans are on Ted Cruz. 

Advertisement

RUDY KOSKI: Hurricane Beryl got political earlier in the week. President Biden claimed that, federal aid was slow to get to Texas because he wasn’t able to reach Governor Greg Abbott or other state leaders. After the storm hit. Abbott and Lieutenant Governor and Chief Nim Kidd storming back, calling the president a liar. Brian, you know, there’s a lot of pushback into all this, and it all comes at a time in regards to the president’s mental capacity. So does it all play into that. 

Advertisement

BRIAN SMITH: Right now, for Biden, the bar is so high. Any semblance of what I’m doing right now, any small mistake flub, miscue is going to raise questions about his capability for office. 

MARK WIGGINS: But we’ve seen it in past disasters. Politicians aren’t afraid to make federal aid political when the White House and the governor are from different parties. And, you know, I just think that’s an unfortunate commentary on the state of our politics. 

BRAD JOHNSON: And one thing, it was kind of an on goal because it took a little bit of heat off Abbott for not being here in the States when this disaster struck. 

Advertisement

RUDY KOSKI: All right. Let’s wrap it up with one word, and we’ll start off with Mark. Mark, what’s your word for the week? 

Advertisement

MARK WIGGINS: Decision. 

BRAD JOHNSON: Outages. 

Advertisement

BRIAN SMITH: CenterPoint. 

RUDY KOSKI: And that is This Week in Texas Politics. 



Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading
Advertisement

Trending