Connect with us

Massachusetts

Magic mushrooms will be on the ballot in Massachusetts

Published

on

Magic mushrooms will be on the ballot in Massachusetts


Four ballot questions have been certified to go before voters, all of which could substantially alter Bay State laws and one of which could substantially alter some Bay State adults’ perceptions of reality. 

Subscribe to continue reading this article.

Already subscribed? To login in, click here.



Source link

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Massachusetts

When will the Mass. cannabis agency have a new boss?

Published

on

When will the Mass. cannabis agency have a new boss?


The Massachusetts cannabis regulatory agency is several months away from naming a new executive director, after initially hoping to fill the role by June.

Members of the Cannabis Control Commission aim to select the agency’s next executive director by October, according to a timeline laid out Thursday by acting executive director Debbie Hilton-Creek.

Under that schedule, the commission will have gone over a year without a dedicated chief. Shawn Collins, the commission’s inaugural executive director, went on parental leave in September and resigned before returning in December.



Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Massachusetts

A grand new flag for Massachusetts – The Boston Globe

Published

on

A grand new flag for Massachusetts – The Boston Globe


Design by committee — again!

On June 22, you kindly published my letter (”How would you redesign the Massachusetts flag?” Opinion) commenting on what I consider the folly (and in my career experience, frustration) of designing anything — let alone a new Massachusetts flag — by government committees.

On Friday, I chuckled and mumbled, “Oh great!” seeing Jeff Jacoby’s follow-up column with the collection of ideas (”Readers offer their designs for a new Massachusetts flag,” Opinion, July 12) by the scariest design committee of all: Everybody!

Andy Spiegel

Winchester

Advertisement

How about a new motto too?

Jeff Jacoby’s earlier flag column (“A simple fix for the Massachusetts flag,” Opinion, June 20) and my letter on the subject generated a lot of discussion locally, which led me to think the flag redesign should start with a revised motto. Outside of its original context of 1775, when our Commonwealth was in armed rebellion against British Occupation, our current motto is a little hard to understand. It’s long, and it’s in Latin, which makes it meaningless to most people without translation.

An alternative I proposed in local discussion was “Leaders in Liberty.” I think the motto should include the word liberty because the concept of American liberty is one thing most Americans can agree on. It’s probably our most important contribution to the world, and its birthplace is right here in Massachusetts.

My motto fits on a license plate and is both historically powerful and aspirational. Imagine if we asked with each discussion of a given problem, “How can greater freedom help fix this problem?” Imagine if over time, our Commonwealth became the state known for fostering the development of modern leadership in liberty as we did historically. And imagine if our pantheon of leaders was enriched with people once ignored who we now recognize as contributing to the concept and practice of American liberty.

Roger Wilson

Advertisement

Winchester

Here’s my vote

Thanks to Jeff Jacoby for his illustrated column. I vote for number 4, the design by Cal Nez and Mark Wagner. It keeps the best design elements of the old flag and removes everything distasteful about it. The implied message of respect and cooperation between races is most welcome. This new design for a new flag is a clear winner. Nothing else on the page comes close.

Tim Parker

Marblehead

Advertisement

We have a winner — all of them

Some excellent concrete suggestions were made in Jeff Jacoby’s July 12 column, which the Commonwealth should use in making a decision on a new state flag. They are well thought out, and if we are going to change the flag, any one of them would work.

Because the Commonwealth previously spent $100,000 (that’s a lot of lobster rolls for lunch!) on a committee that was unable to come up with a decision they were tasked to make, and now wants a new committee, it seems only right that the governor instead send a check for $100,000 to Jeff since his “committee” has already saved time with reasonable ideas, and the governor can choose one of them. Next decision.

Charles Martel

Boston

Advertisement





Source link

Continue Reading

Massachusetts

Western Massachusetts town named a best place to live in the U.S. – Boston Agent Magazine

Published

on

Western Massachusetts town named a best place to live in the U.S. – Boston Agent Magazine


A Western Massachusetts town has been named one of the best places to live in the U.S. 

Money’s 2024 Best Places to Live features 50 communities “built around thoughtful policy, civic engagement and community spirit.” 

This year, not only did the publication use data to determine which cities and towns made the list, but it tried something new. Money says it is crafted from the ground up through thorough research and detailed reporting. A particular focus was placed on areas highly committed to livability, equity and sustainability. Additionally, readers were invited to participate in a newsletter poll, which generated hundreds of suggestions.

Each community was compared against a handful of metrics including local job market health, average housing costs, percentage of residents living in poverty and quality of public schools. 

Advertisement

This year the publication also decided not to assign number rankings and instead grouped them into five categories: suburbs with a soul, hidden gems, new boomtowns, not just college towns and culture hubs. 

Northampton, Massachusetts, made the list in the Not Just College Towns category. 

Located a little more than two hours west of Boston, Northampton is in the heart of the Five-College area and home to Smith College. 

Money touts it as a town that dates back to the 1800s but still retains that charm. 

Plus it boasts some pretty famous residents including Sylvia Plath. Madeleine L’Engle, Julia Child,  Jonathan Edwards, Sojourner Truth, Leonard Baskin, Amelia Earhart and Calvin Coolidge. 

Advertisement

With a population of 29,000, the median list price of a home in Northampton is $469,000, and its unemployment rate is 3.1%.

 



Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading
Advertisement

Trending