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Florida man allegedly dangles, drops child headfirst from 2-story hotel balcony: 'Tragic event'

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A Florida man was arrested over the weekend after authorities said he dangled and dropped a child headfirst off a second-story hotel balcony in Daytona Beach.

Authorities with the Daytona Beach Police Department said Brandon Gilmore, 31, is facing an aggravated child abuse charge after the incident that happened on Saturday afternoon at the Sandlewood Resort.

According to the arrest affidavit obtained by Fox News Digital, police were alerted to a trauma situation at the Sandlewood Resort on Saturday afternoon.

Gilmore told police he met a woman at a hotel pool five hours prior to the incident. 

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Brandon Gilmore was arrested on July 6, 2024, and charged with aggravated child abuse. (Volusia County Jail)

According to the arrest affidavit, Gilmore said the woman invited him to her room where he asked for permission to take her son outside to play with him and “scare him a little bit.”

Gilmore then went outside the hotel room and held the boy by his legs and dangled him over the balcony, police said.

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Witnesses verified that the child was dangled and that they heard the child screaming before he was dropped, headfirst, from the two-story balcony, the arrest affidavit stated.

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Both Gilmore and the woman had been drinking all day at the pool, according to the report.

WISCONSIN FATHER ARRESTED FOR CHILD ABUSE AFTER CLAIMING NEWBORN SON WAS HIT BY AN IPAD

Volusia County Beach in Florida

A Volusia County sign is shown near a beach in Florida. (JESUS OLARTE/AFP via Getty Images)

Video surveillance also captured the incident, verifying witness statements and Gilmore’s account, police said.

“The child is doing fine and has been discharged from the hospital and is not expected to have any long-term health issues as a result of this tragic event,” an officer with the Daytona Police Department said in a statement to Fox News Digital.

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The affidavit did not reveal the child’s age.

Gilmore remains in custody at the Volusia County Jail without bond, according to online jail records.

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Shark Watch: Top 10 most dangerous beaches involving shark attacks, surfer deaths

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Florida waters have worn the crown as the king of shark attacks for the last decade.

There have been 259 shark bites in the Sunshine State since 2012, according to the International Shark Attack File (ISAF).

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The only other states that recorded enough shark attacks to even be a footnote on the list are Hawaii and South Carolina, with 76 and 49, respectively. 

A study by a law firm incorporated shark bites in a report that rated the most dangerous beaches in the United States. 

SHARK WATCH: TRIATHLETE DRAGGED UNDERWATER, ATTACKED 4 TIMES AT ONCE: ‘YOU DON’T HAVE AN ARM…WHY ARE YOU LAUGHING?’

A great white shark swims in the waters off of California. (Photo by Reinhard Dirscherl/ullstein bild via Getty Images)

Not surprisingly, the top 10 most dangerous beaches are all in Florida, according to Simmrin Law’s report, and 24 of the top 25 are Sunshine State shores. 

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Only Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, broke into the top 25. That location had 24 surf zone deaths and shark attacks, as well as 33 hurricanes, according to Fox Tampa.

SHARK WATCH: ATTACK SURVIVOR REMEMBERS BEING TRAPPED ‘IN A FEEDING FRENZY’

The experts also took into account other dangers, such as hurricanes and rip tides, and graded the country’s most dangerous beaches. The higher the score out of 100, the more dangerous the beach. 

Here is the top 10, according to that law group.

Walton County, Florida beach

Law enforcement remove a shark attack victim from Walton County, Florida beaches on June 7, 2024. (Walton County Sheriff)

A shark off Cape Cod

A shark is seen swimming across a sandbar on Aug. 13, 2021 from a shark watch with Dragonfly Sportfishing charters, off the Massachusetts coast of Cape Cod. (AP Photo/Phil Marcelo, File)

10. Miramar Beach, 40.63

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This is the only beach in the top 10 where a shark did not attack someone in 2023, according to Fox Tampa, based on the law firm’s report. 

However, seven surfers died in these waters last year. 

SERIES OF SHARK ATTACKS BLAMED ORCAS – MARINE BIOLOGIST SAYS NO

9. Melbourne Beach, 40.9

There were 19 recorded shark attacks in 2023, according to KTSM, citing Simmrin Law’s report. 

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Most of the victims were surfers, KTSM reported. 

8. Indialantic Beach, 41.02

Eight people at Indialantic Beach were attacked by sharks, and six surfers died in the rough waters.

7. Ponce Inlet, 41.54

In Ponce Inlet, there were 34 shark attacks and two surfer deaths, KTSM reported.

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6. Ormond Beach, 41.57

This beach nearly cracked the top five most dangerous beaches in the country because of its rip currents, which claimed the lives of six surfers. 

Pie chart 2023 shark attacks

Florida, which has 1,350 miles of coastline, once again dominated the U.S. bite total, the study says. Percentages in these charts are approximations. (Florida Museum of Natural History’s International Shark Attack File)

5. Cocoa Beach, 46.35

Cocoa Beach waters were a shark feeding frenzy in 2023, with 26 recorded attacks in 2023, but none were fatal.

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4. Miami Beach, 47.78

Miami Beach’s dangers really do not have much to do with sharks or dead surfers; it is seemingly hurricane season all the time. 

It has experienced a total of 126 hurricanes, KTSM reported. 

Algae on a Miami beach

Hurricanes make Miami Beach one of the most dangerous beaches. (Jeffrey Greenberg/Universal Images Group via Getty Images)

Miami Beach

The white sands and turquoise ocean of beautiful Miami Beach, Florida, as shot from an altitude of about 500 feet during a helicopter photo flight. (Credit: iStock)

3. Daytona Beach, 60.01

Taking the bronze medal that it likely did not want is Daytona Beach, which had 141 recorded shark attacks, the second most in the country, according to KTSM. 

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2. Panama City Beach, 67.75

Last year, 32 surfers died off the coast of Panama City Beach, which was closed to the public on June 23 because of life-threatening rip currents, AL.com reported.

1. New Smyrna Beach, 76.04

Nicknamed the “shark bite capital of the world,” New Smyrna Beach recorded 186 shark attacks in 2023, and its location along the Atlantic makes it prone to hurricane devastation. 

Memorial day crowd Myrtle Beach

Crowds enjoy the beach on May 29, 2021 in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. (Sean Rayford/Getty Images)

 

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Michael Simmrin said in a statement with the report that shark attacks “grab headlines,” but Florida’s beaches rank so high in terms of dangers because of “the ever-present hurricane risk.” 

“Hurricanes create dangerous rip currents and storm surge, raising the overall risk for beachgoers,” Simmrin said. 

“With summer approaching and vacations on the minds of many Americans, this study shows the importance of putting safety first when considering a trip to the beach.”

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Meet the American who created NASCAR: Bill France Sr., Daytona speed demon, racetrack pioneer

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Bill France Sr. was born with a mind for business, a gift for people and a need for speed. 

He turned those passions into a nationwide obsession with stock car racing. 

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France founded the National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing — NASCAR — on Feb. 21, 1948, in Daytona Beach, Florida. 

NASCAR has grown into the world’s premier stock car racing circuit. “Big Bill,” as he was known, is the unquestioned godfather of the autosport.

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“His story is a great American success story,” NASCAR historian Ken Martin told Fox News Digital. 

“And NASCAR is the great American sport.”

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Bill France Sr. in the pre-NASCAR days. France, a native of Washington, D.C., moved to Daytona Beach, Florida, in his 20s, ran an auto shop and raced cars before founding NASCAR in 1948.  (ISC Archives/CQ-Roll Call Group via Getty Images)

Stock cars, at least in the sport’s earliest years, were essentially production-model cars turned into racing vehicles. 

“Bill’s vision was to basically take cars from the assembly line and put them on the racetrack to see who built the better car, the faster car, the more durable car,” said Martin.

“His story is a great American success story.” — NASCAR historian Ken Martin 

“He knew Americans could relate to the vehicles on the racetrack. He also knew he could generate support from Detroit by pitting Chevys against Fords.”

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Much as football is a largely American sports phenomenon — other countries dabble in it — stock car racing remains a largely American form of auto competition.

MEET THE AMERICAN WHO FOUGHT AND BLED AT THE ALAMO BUT LIVED TO TELL ITS HEROIC TALE: SLAVE JOE

Bill France Sr. was enamored with auto racing as a child and became a master of auto mechanics. He also had a passion for putting his mechanical skills to the test behind the wheels of race cars.

Daytona Speedway 1959

Bill France Sr. looks on from the track he created circa 1959 at the Daytona International Speedway in Daytona Beach, Florida.   (ISC Archives/CQ-Roll Call Group via Getty Images)

“He was a gearhead,” said Martin. “But also a competitor.”

France boasted mechanical knowledge, fearlessness behind the wheel, a towering physical stature (6 foot 5 inches) and a charismatic personal presence. 

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He commanded respect from the toughest drivers in the nation — the proverbial backwoods moonshine runners who fueled the early pool of race-car drivers. 

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“Well, let’s just say he ‘ran the show,’” NASCAR legend Richard Petty wrote in the foreword to “Big Bill: The Life and Times of NASCAR Founder Bill France Sr.,” a 2015 biography by H.A. Branham. 

“Let’s just say he ‘ran the show.’ — NASCAR legend Richard Petty of Bill France Sr. 

“It was ‘his show’ and I think that everybody that raced in NASCAR for him knew it was ‘his show.’”

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“The big man had big dreams,” writes the International Motor Sports Hall of Fame, “and he made them come true.” 

Birthplace of NASCAR

Bill France Sr. was born on Sept. 26, 1909 in Washington, D.C., to William Henry France and Emma (Graham) France, his mother an immigrant from Ireland.

NASCAR founder Bill France Sr.

Bill France Sr., was an early open-wheel race driver long before he embraced the future with full-bodied stock cars. Here he shows off this Model T-based sprinter at a track in Maryland in 1931.  (ISC Archives/CQ-Roll Call Group via Getty Images)

He fueled his passion for speed as a teenager by racing his Model T at a wooden track in Laurel, Maryland.

He moved to Daytona Beach, Florida, in 1934 with his wife, Anne (Bledsoe) — a nurse and North Carolina native — plus their year-old son Bill Jr. with only “a set of tools and $25 cash,” according to one origin legend. 

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All three Frances became transformational figures in NASCAR. 

Anne served as a longtime NASCAR executive. Bill Jr. took over NASCAR from his father, running the circuit from 1972 until 2000. 

Despite arriving in Daytona during the depths of the Great Depression, Bill Sr. landed a job working for local mechanic Saxton Lloyd. It was an opportunity for which France would show his gratitude years later. 

He opened his own service station and became a prominent local mechanic while racing cars on Daytona Beach. 

The city’s legendary beach-street course raced two miles up the sand, turned on a ramp, then sped two miles back down State Route A1A on pavement before repeating the circuit.

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Daytona Beach hosted its first beach-street race in 1936. France finished fifth as a driver, while serving as the pre-race mechanic for winning driver Milt Marion, behind the wheel of a Ford. 

“By 1938 the city realized they were not the best at promoting racing,” said Martin. “They asked France to help promote it.” 

Sports entertainment exploded across America in the years after the war.

World War II interrupted Daytona’s effort to become the hub of stock car racing. 

France put his mechanical abilities toward the war effort.

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Bill France auto service

Before he became “Mr. NASCAR,” Bill France Sr. was a prosperous Daytona Beach garage owner and gasoline retailer. France’s gas station at 316 Main Street was also a haven for area racers anxious to have work performed on their race cars. This 1940s business card shows “Big Bill’s” inventiveness.  (ISC Archives/CQ-Roll Call Group via Getty Images)

“Bill Sr., at age 32, was not eligible for the draft and went to work building ‘subchasers’ at the Daytona Boat Works — a major employer of Volusia County residents,” writes biographer Branham. 

Sports entertainment exploded across America in the years after the war. The NBA was founded in 1946. Pro football expanded to the West Coast the same year when the NFL Rams moved from Cleveland to Los Angeles. 

France added stock car racing to the national menu of sports options.

The rival new All-America Football Conference was also founded in 1946, with familiar franchises such as the 49ers, Browns and Colts soon absorbed by the NFL. 

France added stock car racing to the national menu of sports options.

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He led a meeting with other drivers, mechanics and auto enthusiasts in December 1947 at Streamline Hotel in Daytona Beach to make plans for a new professional stock car racing circuit with uniform rules, regulations and standards. 

NASCAR founding

A series of three meetings convened at the Streamline Hotel in Daytona Beach to establish criteria for professional stock car racing, leading to NASCAR’s formation. On Dec. 14, 1947: Front row, kneeling (L-R), Chick DiNatale, Jimmy Quisenberry, Ed Bruce, Jack Peters, Alvin Hawkins. Back row, standing (L-R), Freddie Horton, Sam Packard, Ed Samples (hidden), Joe Ross, Marshall Teague, Bill Tuthill, Joe Littlejohn, Bob Osiecki, Buddy Shuman, Lucky Sauer (hidden), Tom Galan, Eddie Bland, Bill France Sr., Bob Richards, Harvey Tattersall Jr., Fred Dagavar, Bill Streeter, Jimmy Cox.  (ISC Archives/CQ-Roll Call Group via Getty Images)

NASCAR was formed two months later, with France its chief executive. 

The site of the Streamline Hotel “stands to this day as a racing landmark,” says the NASCAR Hall of Fame. 

‘World Center of Racing’

Daytona was a magnet for speed enthusiasts in the earliest days of the automobile — long before France arrived and even before France was born. 

NASCAR founder Bill France service station

One of the gas stations Bill France Sr. operated in Daytona Beach, Florida, around the time NASCAR was formed in 1947 is shown here. (ISC Images & Archives via Getty Images)

“On the hard-packed sands of Florida’s east coast, the idea of racing automobiles became a reality in 1903,” writes Michael Hembree in “NASCAR: The Definitive History of America’s Sport.” 

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“At Ormond Beach, north of Daytona, wealthy winter visitors to the resort area eyed the long flat beach stretches as an ideal landscape for tinkering with their toys.” 

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The region’s hard, flat beaches made it the perfect proving ground for daredevils of the day, who topped 200 miles per hour in the straight-shot speed efforts.

English racer Sir Malcolm Campbell astounded onlookers by reaching a record speed of 278.6 MPH on Daytona Beach in 1935, propelled over the land by an aircraft engine.

Race on Daytona Beach

Fans react in 1940 as a driver rolls his car during a stock car race on the Daytona Beach-Road Course. Three races were held on the beach that year and were won by Roy Hall, Bill France (later the founder of NASCAR) and Buck Mathis. A special “ladies only” race was also held; it attracted 13 contestants, including France’s wife Anne. Evelyn Reed won the event.  (ISC Images & Archives via Getty Images)

Auto enthusiasts soon found an even better proving ground out west: the Bonneville Salt Flats of Utah. 

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The salt flats were harder, straighter and faster, without the inconvenience or even danger of rising tides.

Daytona lost one of its cash cows. It turned to racing as a way to replace the business lost to Bonneville, said Martin.

“Daytona was looking to plug a hole in its economy,” said Ken Martin, when it tapped France to help promote its beach-street races in the 1930s. 

“France put his plans for the future of racing in Daytona Beach, Florida, in motion on April 4, 1953, with a proposal to construct a permanent speedway facility,” reports the speedway in an online account of its history.

Daytona Speedway

Before the asphalt was laid, Bill France Sr., and members of his NASCAR staff parked these cars on a turn of the under-construction Daytona International Speedway in December 1958. France gambled nearly everything he owned in building the facility that is known as “The World Center of Racing.”  (ISC Archives/CQ-Roll Call Group via Getty Images)

He envisioned, planned and funded the racetrack of the future: Daytona International Speedway.

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“France put his plans for the future of racing in Daytona Beach, Florida, in motion on April 4, 1953, with a proposal to construct a permanent speedway facility,” reports the speedway in an online account of its history.

English racer Sir Malcolm Campbell astounded onlookers by reaching a record speed of 278.6 MPH on Daytona Beach in 1935.

“On August 16, 1954, France signed a contract with City of Daytona Beach and Volusia County officials to build what would become Daytona International Speedway, the ‘World Center of Racing.” 

The 2.5-mile speedway opened in 1959. Among its ground-breaking features: 31-degree banking turns that allowed race cars to maintain dramatic speeds in the turns.

The Daytona infield boasted a 29-acre lake — Lake Lloyd, named in honor of the mechanic who gave France his first job in Daytona. 

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Lake Lloyd

NASCAR driver Michael McDowell poses with his team as he competes at the annual Hot Rods & Reels Celebrity Fishing Tournament to benefit The Darrell Gwynn Chapter of The Buoniconti Fund to Cure Paralysis at Daytona International Speedway’s Lake Lloyd, Feb. 18, 2022. Lake Lloyd is named for Saxton Lloyd, a mechanic who gave Bill France Sr. his first job in Daytona. (James Gilbert/Getty Images for The Buoniconti Fund To Cure Paralysis)

France built an even larger track in Alabama, the 2.66-mile Talladega Superspeedway, in 1969.

“He had a vision for building these huge race tracks, because he knew they’d handle high speeds and attract huge crowds,” said Martin. 

Daytona International Speedway, France’s speedway, remains NASCAR’s premier track. 

The circuit kicks off the new racing season each February with the Daytona 500. It’s also been the site of the sport’s most important events. 

Racing legend Dale Earnhardt won his first Daytona 500 after 20 attempts in February 1998 — “a major event” in NASCAR history by the beloved driver, said Martin.

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“Dale Earnhardt’s death was a pivotal moment in (NASCAR) history.” — Ken Martin

It’s also where Earnhardt was tragically killed in February 2001, on the last lap of the Daytona 500. 

“NASCAR has lost its greatest driver ever, and I personally have lost a great friend,” Bill France Jr., then NASCAR’s chairman, said in the aftermath.

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Earnhardt’s death was one of the first events that “blew up the internet,” to use a more recent term. The nationwide outpouring displayed over the internet proved Earnhardt’s popularity — and that NASCAR had become far more than just a regional phenomenon.

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Dale Earnhardt looks on from the Earnhardt Grandstand

Dale Earnhardt checks out the view from the newly completed Earnhardt Grandstand during winter testing, two weeks before the Daytona 500, at Daytona International Speedway, Daytona Beach, in this file photo from Feb. 2001. He was killed on the last lap of the Daytona 500 on Feb. 18, 2001.  (Brian Cleary/Getty Images)

The tragedy at Daytona, said Martin, ultimately made NASCAR better and safer.

NASCAR moved the driver’s seat closer to the center of the vehicle, built a “cocoon” around the drivers, mandated head restraints and built soft-barrier walls to absorb some of the impact of a crash. 

“Earnhardt’s death was a pivotal moment in our history,” said Martin. “It made everyone refocus on safety.”

‘Something to do with all of this’

Bill France Sr. died on June 7, 1992, after battling Alzheimer’s disease. He was 82. 

For more Lifestyle articles, visit www.foxnews.com/lifestyle

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NASCAR today is recognized as the world’s premier stock car racing circuit with a devoted fan base around the nation. 

Races have expanded far beyond NASCAR’s early southeastern base. NASCAR races are held from California to New England, and from Austin to Milwaukee. 

NASCAR founder and former CEO Bill France Sr., left, talks with a U.S. Secret Service agent regarding security for Vice President George H.W. Bush prior to the start of the 1983 Daytona 500 stock car race at Daytona International Speedway in Daytona Beach. Bush served as the race's honorary starter.

NASCAR founder and former CEO Bill France Sr., left, talks with a U.S. Secret Service agent regarding security for Vice President George H.W. Bush prior to the start of the 1983 Daytona 500 stock car race at Daytona International Speedway in Daytona Beach. Bush served as the race’s honorary starter. (Robert Alexander/Getty Images)

About 2.5 million people attend NASCAR races each year, generating about $200 million in revenue, according to industry data. Millions more watch each race on television.

NASCAR inked an $8.2 billion, 10-year deal with Fox Sports and NBC Sports in 2015. 

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NASCAR was briefly publicly traded, but is once again run by the France family. 

“Big Bill” has enjoyed countless honors in the sports world. 

Bill France Sr.

NASCAR founder and president Bill France Sr. walking down the raceway at Daytona International Speedway in Daytona, Florida, on Feb. 16, 1968.  (Eric Schweikardt /Sports Illustrated via Getty Images)

He’s a member of the International Motorsports Hall of Fame, the Motorsports Hall of Fame of America, the Automotive Hall of Fame, the Daytona Beach Stock Car Racing Hall of Fame and — of course — the NASCAR Hall of Fame.

“I think Bill Sr. would be proud of NASCAR today, proud of the fact that his son took it one step further than he did and proud that his grandson has taken it another step further,” Richard Petty wrote in “Big Bill: The Life and Times of NASCAR Founder Bill France Sr.”Bill Sr. would be proud of NASCAR today, proud of the fact that his son took it one step further than he did and proud that his grandson has taken it another step further

NASCAR creator

“Bill Sr. would be proud of NASCAR today, proud of the fact that his son took it one step further than he did and proud that his grandson has taken it another step further.” (Fox Nation)

“Now, he wouldn’t have done it the same way, but he would have sat back and told you: ‘Yeah, I had something to do with all of this.’”

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Florida country club neighborhood terrorized by knife-wielding boy targeting adult women for abduction: police

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Florida authorities have arrested a 13-year-old boy accused of attempting to abduct women in the same neighborhood and wielding a knife in two incidents.

The attempts allegedly went on over several weeks, impacting multiple victims, according to an arrest report from the Indian River County Sheriff’s Office obtained by local news.

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“I’m here to tell you today that the brave men and women over here did a fantastic job in putting this bad guy away,” Sheriff Eric Flowers said during a Thursday press conference, according to CBS 12.

Authorities received four tips between June and July that led them to the young teen. On Wednesday, they stopped the suspect while he was riding inside a vehicle.

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A 13-year-old Florida boy has been accused of trying to abduct women in a Vero Beach country club community. (Indian River County Sheriff)

Deputies then interviewed the suspect, who allegedly admitted to being the person captured in security camera footage connected to the cases. The boy’s mother also asked if the person in the videos was him, and he allegedly told her yes.

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The teen described being in a dreamlike state while allegedly attempting to abduct the women in his interviews with officers, according to the arrest report obtained by CBS 12.

MISSING NORTH CAROLINA GIRL MADALINA COJOCARI’S SEARCH FOCUSES ATTENTION ON NEW SUSPECT

“His story was that he felt that he was in a dream-like state, that he was watching himself from above. That he didn’t know if it was real,” Flowers said during the press conference.

The 13-year-old suspect appears on security camera footage

The teen described being in a dreamlike state while allegedly attempting to abduct the women in his interviews with officers, according to the arrest report. (Indian River County Sheriff)

The first abduction attempt apparently occurred on June 29, though it was not reported to law enforcement at the time and only became known to authorities after the sheriff’s office issued a warning about the two most recent abduction attempts on Sunday.

During the June incident, a victim told authorities that she was walking her dog near townhouses in a country club community called Pointe West in Vero Beach when her dog became alert and started looking toward the alleyway. She alleged that the suspect followed her home and, when she went inside, started banging on the door.

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“[T]he kid’s got some major issues.”

— Sheriff Eric Flowers

“There was another woman who lives over in the townhouses that came forward that said, ‘I saw that kid, he was not looking right. He approached me. I ran in my house, and he starts banging on my door.’ So, the kid’s got some major issues. He’s got serious issues,” Sheriff Flowers said, according to CBS 12.

The boy’s mother allegedly said that her son is a compulsive liar.

The Pointe West community entrance

During the June incident, a victim told authorities that she was walking her dog near townhouses in a country club community called Pointe West in Vero Beach when her dog became alert and started looking toward the alleyway. (Google Maps)

When the victim saw video footage of the suspect posted by the sheriff’s office to their Facebook page, the victim told authorities she was sure the person in her case was the same person in the video.

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On July 2, a victim said she had walked outside her home to pick up shoes she’d left out to dry when the suspect approached her, armed with an 8-inch knife. Sheriff Flowers said the suspect used a knife in at least two incidents.

US MARSHALS RECOVER 200 MISSING CHILDREN ACROSS US DURING OPERATION ‘WE WILL FIND YOU 2’

In that case and another July case, victims were able to escape the suspect by screaming. One victim said she bit and kicked the suspect until he let her go.

The camouflaged shirt authorities collected from the suspect's house

Authorities collected clothing from the suspect’s home that matched a description of the suspect. (Indian River County Sheriff)

Most recently, on Sunday, the suspect allegedly approached two different victims while wearing a mask. In one case, he told the victim, “You’re coming with me,” according to CBS 12. In another, he put his hand on the victim’s mouth and said something that has been redacted in the police report.

The 13-year-old escaped after the victims started screaming.

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Authorities also collected clothing from the suspect’s home that matched a description of the suspect.

The teen is charged with attempted kidnapping, and he is currently being held at a juvenile detention center.

“I am incredibly proud of our entire team who worked tirelessly to put our suspect behind bars,” Flowers said. “We are thankful for the community that came together and provided the critical information that helped make this case. It’s the community-law enforcement partnership that works, and this case is proof of that.”

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