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Scrimmage planned between current Kentucky roster and La Familia TBT team

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Scrimmage planned between current Kentucky roster and La Familia TBT team


We could maybe, hopefully, get our first look at the new Kentucky Wildcats squad in action, taking on some UK alumni preparing for their TBT debut.

According to the Herald-Leader, there is a planned scrimmage between both squads in preparation for La Familia’s TBT tournament just around the corner.

Mark Pope is excited to welcome back the former Wildcats.

“It’s going to be a huge deal,” Kentucky head coach Mark Pope said last week. “We’re going to take every opportunity to support these greats. We have three national champions that are coming back to be a part of this team and a bunch of guys that went far in the NCAA Tournament and served Kentucky really well, and a bunch of draft picks, guys that had good careers in the league.

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“So, to have those former players back is really special, and we’re incredibly excited to take full advantage of that.”

The No. 2 seed La Familia consists of the Harrison Twins (Andrew and Aaron), Eric Bledspe, Kellan Grady, Nate Sestina, Marquis Teague, James Young, Willie Cauley-Stein, Reid Travis, Doron Lamb, and Daniel Orton.

“One of the great things for us is that former players are allowed to be on the court with our current players,” Pope continued. “These guys are preparing for a tournament where they have a chance to represent Kentucky and themselves in a brilliant way, and we’re trying to prepare for a huge season, and so we’re going to try to do that together a little bit.”

La Familia will tip off against the 305 Ballers in Lexington on July 19th at 8 PM on FS2.



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Kentucky

Future Wildcats shine in updated 2025 recruiting rankings

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Future Wildcats shine in updated 2025 recruiting rankings


If you watched ESPN’s 150th Anniversary of College Football series, you may have heard Rece Davis mention how recruiting is the lifeblood of college football. Recruiting is a vital difference in being able to achieve sustained success year after year.

It’s never too early to start looking at 2025 recruiting for the Kentucky Wildcats, with 247 Sports releasing their updated rankings for the 2025 class.

Here’s how the Cats’ top commitments in 2025 fared in this update:

  • Cedric Works, DE (Clayton, Ohio): No. 86 prospect (No. 11 Edge rusher); 93 rating
  • Javeon Campbell, DL (Frankfort, Kentucky): No. 109 prospect (No. 15 Defensive Lineman); 92 rating
  • Quintin Simmons Jr. (Cincinnati, Ohio): No. 161 prospect (No. 16 Wide Receiver); 91 rating
  • Martels Carter Jr. (Paducah, Kentucky): No. 223 prospect (No. 19 Safety); 91 rating

Kentucky currently ranks No. 19 overall in the 247 team rankings for the 2025 recruiting class, highlighted by seven 4-star commits and an average rating of 88.78. They are the ninth-highest-rated class in the 16-team SEC.

Elsewhere, ESPN analyzed the top 40 classes in 2025, with Kentucky ranked No. 18 overall. Five Kentucky commits made the ESPN 300, highlighted by running back Marquis Davis (No. 117 overall) on offense and defensive end Javeon Campbell (No. 173 overall) on defense.

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The Wildcats’ offense featured Ray Davis, one of the top rushers in the SEC now with the Buffalo Bills, in 2023. Marquise Davis gives them another talented rusher, even if it’ll be another season before he arrives. A versatile player who could also project to defense, Davis has a sturdy build at 5-foot-11, 204 pounds with a nice blend of speed and quickness. He’s a productive runner who rushed for more than 2,000 yards as a junior.

Kentucky has used transfers in recent years at quarterback, but ESPN 300 QB Stone Saunders give the Wildcats a promising option to develop within the system. A competitive player with good arm strength, Saunders will be a four-year starter in high school. He threw for more than 3,000 yards and 50 touchdowns as a junior. The Wildcats have kept some of the state’s top defensive prospects at home in ESPN 300 safety Martels Carter Jr. and DE Campbell. Carter has good speed, ball skills and can contribute in the return game. Campbell is a basketball player with limited prep football experience having started playing as a junior but has shown he is a quick study notching over a dozen sacks last year and still has room to grow as a player and could be a disruptive and versatile defensive lineman for the Wildcats.

Mark Stoops and Co. appear to have another special class in the works.



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A battery of new laws set to take effect in Kentucky on Monday; legislature passed 200 bills – NKyTribune

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A battery of new laws set to take effect in Kentucky on Monday; legislature passed 200 bills – NKyTribune


Legislative Research Commission

A battery of new state laws will take effect in Kentucky next week, including key measures on crime, autonomous vehicles, maternal health and child protection.

The Kentucky General Assembly passed more than 200 bills during the 60-day session and most will become effective on Monday.

(LRC photo)

The Kentucky Constitution specifies that new laws take effect 90 days after the adjournment of the legislature unless they have special effective dates, are general appropriation measures, or include emergency clauses that make them effective immediately upon becoming law.

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The general assembly adjourned the 2024 session on April 15, making July 15 the effective date for most bills.
 
Some of the measures set to take effect include:
 
Adoption Records: House Bill 87 will allow some family members to inspect adoption records if they are related to someone who was adopted or to the birth parents who gave up a child for adoption. The records can only be inspected after both birth parents or the adoptee have passed away.
 
Animal Abuse: House Bill 258 seeks to strengthen state laws against torturing a dog or cat. That includes stiffer penalties for first-time offenders, who could face a class D felony rather than a misdemeanor charge under the bill.
 
Autonomous Vehicles: House Bill 7 creates a legal framework in state statute for operating autonomous vehicles in Kentucky. The bill will take effect July 15 except for one section related to platoons of vehicles, which does not take effect until August 2026.
 
Capitol Statues: House Bill 513 requires the Historic Properties Advisory Commission to receive approval from the Kentucky General Assembly before adding or removing any statues, monuments or art on permanent display in the Capitol rotunda.
 
Child Care Subsidies: Senate Bill 240 clarifies that foster parents who work remotely can receive child care subsidies.


 
Child Protection: House Bill 278 will ramp up the criminal penalties for offenders who sexually abuse, assault or exploit children. The bill also seeks to prevent people convicted of sex crimes or violent felonies from working in public schools. Another provision in the final bill will require age verification to access adult websites.
 
Child Sex Dolls: House Bill 207 creates felony penalties for possessing, trafficking, importing or promoting the use of a child sex doll. It also expands laws against child pornography to include computer-generated images of an identifiable minor.
 
Civics Education: House Bill 535 calls on the Kentucky Board of Education to create academic standards for civic literacy in high schools. That includes lessons on America’s founding, the U.S. Constitution, principles of government and civil liberties, among others.
 
Crime Victims: Senate Bill 319 calls for the Crime Victims Compensation Board to make its application process available online, to publish the application in additional languages, and to establish a tracking process for claims. It also clarifies who is eligible to file claims and extends the deadline to file claims.
 
Cursive Handwriting: Senate Bill 167 calls for elementary schools to teach cursive handwriting and ensure that students are proficient in cursive by the end of the fifth grade.
 
Emissions Standards: Senate Bill 215 forbids state agencies from adopting or enforcing California’s emission standards on motor vehicles.
 
Firearms: House Bill 357 forbids government agencies from creating a list of privately owned firearms – or their owners – unless the information relates to a criminal investigation. The bill also prevents credit card companies from creating unique merchant codes for gun stores.
 
Foster Care: Senate Bill 151 allows family members who take temporary custody of a relative’s child to apply to become a relative or fictive kin foster parent. That will help them access more state resources and support.
 
Gas Stations: House Bill 581 prevents local governments from passing or enforcing rules that treat retail gas stations differently from electric vehicle charging stations.
 
Health Care Background Checks: Senate Bill 145 will allow health care providers enrolled in the Medicaid program to conduct employee background checks through Kentucky’s child and adult abuse registries.
 
Health Care Liability: House Bill 159 protects health care providers from criminal liability when a medical error harms a patient. The bill exempts harm resulting from gross negligence or wanton, willful, malicious or intentional misconduct.

Kindergarten readiness (NKyTribune file photo)

Juvenile Offenders: Senate Bill 20 seeks to curb youth gun violence. Among several provisions, it clears the way for juveniles to stand trial as adults if they use a firearm in the commission of certain felonies and they are at least 15 years old.
 
Kratom: House Bill 293 aims to regulate kratom, an herbal drug frequently sold online and in convenience stores. The bill prohibits sales to people under 21 and provides guidelines for manufacturing and labeling the product.
 
Kindergarten Readiness: House Bill 695 will establish the Adaptive Kindergarten Readiness Pilot Project within the Kentucky Department of Education. The program will offer reading, math and science instruction through an online platform.
 
Maternal Health: Senate Bill 74 aims to support maternal and infant health and reduce the high mortality rate for mothers in Kentucky. Several sections of the bill are set to take effect on July 15, including one that will provide more information about breastfeeding and safe sleep to at-risk parents. Other sections will establish a state maternal fatality review team and require state Medicaid services to cover lactation consulting, breastfeeding equipment, and in-home and telehealth services. The bill also calls on state health officials to compile an annual report about the number and types of delivery procedures performed at each hospital. Other sections of the bill will not take effect until 2025.
 
Mathematics Education: House Bill 162 seeks to improve numeracy in Kentucky. It calls for reform to early education math standards and for more professional development for teachers. The bill will also create multitiered support systems for struggling students.
 
Medicinal Cannabis: House Bill 829 seeks to update some aspects of Kentucky’s upcoming medicinal cannabis program. It will allow schools to opt out and allow local governments to apply a small fee to the program, among other changes. Three sections of the bill related to applications for business licenses, state enforcement and patient pamphlets will not take effect until 2025.
 
Missing Adults: Senate Bill 45 calls on Kentucky State Police and other state officials to operate a new alert system that helps find missing people over the age of 17.
 
Nuclear Energy: Senate Bill 198 establishes the Kentucky Nuclear Energy Development Authority to support and facilitate the development of a nuclear energy ecosystem across the state.
 
Official State Rock: House Bill 378 changes the official state rock from Kentucky agate to coal. It also changes the official mineral from coal to calcite and the official gemstone from the freshwater pearl to Kentucky agate.
 
Pseudoephedrine: House Bill 386 eases purchase limits on pseudoephedrine to help people with chronic allergies legally obtain enough of the medication to meet their medical needs.
 
Recording Food Operations: Senate Bill 16 forbids people from capturing or distributing unauthorized video, audio or photos from a commercial food manufacturing facility or an animal feeding operation. Violators could face a class B misdemeanor on the first offense and a class A misdemeanor for a subsequent offense.
 
Research Consortiums: Senate Bill 1 creates an endowment fund to support collaborative research consortiums among public universities in Kentucky. Administered by the Council on Postsecondary Education, the program will focus on research projects that seek to improve quality of life through medicine, health and economic development.
 
Safer Kentucky Act: House Bill 5 aims to crack down on repeat, violent offenders. It will also allow prosecutors to file a manslaughter charge against anyone who sells or distributes fentanyl that causes a fatal overdose. Other provisions seek to curb unlawful street camping and set limits on charitable bail organizations.

Vaping (File photo)

School Bus Behavior: House Bill 446 seeks to address disciplinary issues on school buses. Under the bill, every bus rider and at least one of their parents or guardians will need to sign a transportation agreement with the district. The agreement would outline expectations for students and parents and explain the consequences for misbehavior.
 
School Notifications: Senate Bill 11 seeks, in certain cases, to speed up notifications to schools when a student has been charged with a crime.
 
School Safety: Senate Bill 2 seeks to enhance school safety by allowing some veterans and former police officers to serve as school “guardians.” It also calls on school districts to assemble trauma-informed teams to improve mental health interventions.
 
Sex Offenders and Social Media: Senate Bill 249 will require sex offenders who have been convicted of abusing a minor to use their legal name on social media platforms.
 
Truancy: House Bill 611 calls for school officials to file a complaint with the county attorney when a student misses 15 days or more of school without an excuse. For students in elementary school, the parent would be held responsible.
 
Vaping in Schools: House Bill 142 will ban all tobacco, alternative nicotine and vapor products in Kentucky public schools. It will also require school districts to adopt disciplinary procedures for students who violate the bans.
 
Veteran Suicide Prevention: Under House Bill 30, the Kentucky Department of Veterans Affairs will create a suicide prevention program for service members, veterans and their families.
 
Window Tinting: Senate Bill 46 allows windshield tinting on vehicles as long as at least 70% of light can still pass through the material.
 
Youth Employment Programs: Senate Bill 128 allows nonprofit organizations to employ 12- and 13-year-olds for the purpose of learning life and employment skills. To participate, organizations would need to first receive approval from the state Department of Workplace Standards, and the work can not exceed 18 hours a week.
 
Youth Medical Records: House Bill 174 stipulates that parents have access to their child’s medical records. Right now, children ages 13 and older must sign a waiver for parents to have access. 



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First Down Kentucky: College Football Teams I'll Never Buy and Can't Quit

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First Down Kentucky: College Football Teams I'll Never Buy and Can't Quit


Happy Friday, Big Blue Nation! It’s a slow news day in the world of college football, which gives me the opportunity to share some thoughts about a few programs before Talking Season takes over our lives.

Over the next six weeks, you’ll hear analysts make the case for some teams to make a run to the CFB Playoff, while casting others by the wayside as pretenders. For example, Missouri will get plenty of praise following an 11-win season with the easiest schedule in the SEC on the horizon, but I’m not buying back-to-back outstanding years from Eli Drinkwitz, especially after losing his defensive coordinator to LSU.

That brief synopsis provides some analysis. You won’t get much more from me in this post. I’m using all gut and no brain to share why you should, or shouldn’t buy into the hype this talking season.

Never Buy: Miami

Mario Cristobal is recruiting like he did at Oregon and hitting the portal hard. I don’t care. Yes, the ACC is a terrible conference. Racking up wins shouldn’t be too challenging, especially if they can get a big in-state win over Florida out of the gate. But the problem with The U is not getting a big win or two, it’s sustaining success. Consistency evades that place like a vegan and a barbeque. Don’t believe the hype.

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Can’t Quit: Iowa Unders

Just because Brian Ferentz has left the building, doesn’t mean the Hawkeyes will quit punting to win. Brian’s Dad is just as responsible for their offensive woes. Nevertheless, they’re still going to punt and win a bunch of games this fall.

Got thoughts? Continue the conversation on KSBoard, the KSR Message Board. New members can try 1 month for $1.

Never Buy: Notre Dame

Notre Dame gets judged on different criteria because of they aren’t affiliated with a conference, yet they still get many of the same perks. The Fighting Irish may be good enough to get into the CFB Playoff, but like so many other times over the last 15 years, that doesn’t mean they’re good enough to actually win any games in the postseason.

Can’t Quit: Alabama

I don’t care if Nick Saban is gone, that successful stink isn’t wearing off anytime soon. Kalen DeBoer wins everywhere he goes and he’s got a Heisman Trophy contender under center. Sure, Jalen Milroe has his faults, but his ceiling is good enough to win plenty of big games in Tuscaloosa. Alabama will no longer be the rolling ball of butcher knives that suffocates the rest of the sport, but you will not find me betting on the Empire to collapse overnight.

Sign up for the KSR Newsletter to receive Kentucky Wildcats news in the most ridiculous manner possible.

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Never Buy: Nebraska

This one is a bit touchier subject. I actually got a feeling Matt Rhule will make a significant step forward in year two at Nebraska. The schedule isn’t too daunting this fall. They could be 7-0 when they travel to Columbus to play Ohio State. I’ll probably play with fire and lose money betting on early-season success.

The problem is that even if Nebraska is an eight or nine-win team, their fans still believe they’re one of the biggest brands in the sport. They might be a big brand, but they aren’t a team that’s going to dictate who wins the National Championship.

Can’t Quit: Utah (and Cam Rising)

Trusting teams to succeed in the first year of a new conference is a fool’s errand, one I will happily complete. Why do I trust that Kyle Whittingham moving conferences? Because he’s done it before. The Utes won eight games in their first year in the Pac-12, and that was after moving up from the Mountain West. The Big 12 should be more palatable this fall than last season’s Pac-12.

Utah is making the move with Cam Rising under center, a quarterback who is playing in his seventh college football season. That’s more than enough experience for the Utes to navigate their way to the CFB Playoff.

Never Buy: Texas

Remember when Sam Ehlinger said Texas was back? That was five seasons ago. They’ve been back approximately 72 times since and had to completely start from scratch with a new coach. Sark has this ship well-equipped to bring Texas back, but now they gotta be “back” in the SEC. We sure they’re ready for that? I’m not buying Longhorn stonks in advance.

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