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Pat Colbert Dies: Actress Who Played Dora Mae On ‘Dallas’ Was 77

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Pat Colbert Dies: Actress Who Played Dora Mae On ‘Dallas’ Was 77


Pat Colbert, who played the role of Dora Mae in the series Dallas, has died. She was 77.

According to multiple reports, Colbert died on June 23 at her home in Compton. Colbert had suffered three strokes over the last decade.

Colbert’s first television appearance was in 1979’s Eischiled, playing a model in the series which starred Joe Don Baker. The actress would soon co-star in Flamingo Road, sharing credits with John Beck, Woody Brown, Peter Donat, Howard Duff, Morgan Fairchild, Barbara Rush, and many more.

Throughout the 1980s, Colbert made appearances in shows like Benson (1982), The Fall Guy (1982), Knots Landing (1983), and A Death in California (1985).

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Colbert also starred in CBS’s Capitol, a soap about politics in D.C., playing the character named Cora Mullens.

She first appeared in Dallas Season 7 in 1983, portraying Dora Mae, the host and manager of the Oil Baron’s Club. Colbert stayed on the nighttime soap until its final season in 1991.

After Dallas ended, she appeared in episodes of Sisters (1991) and True Colors (1991).

In film, Colbert played The Nurse in 1981’s S.O.B. and a hooker in the 1982 film Hysterical.

Colbert starred opposite Bill Cosby in the 1987 spy spoof film Leonard Part 6, playing the role of Allison Parker, the wife of Cosby’s character.

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The actress would go on to have credits in films like Thom & Dusty Go to Mexico: The Lost Treasure (2014) and If Not for His Grace (2015).

A funeral for Colbert is set for July 20.

THR was the first to report the news.



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Dallas, TX

Dallas’ big three problems

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Dallas’ big three problems


In coming months, the Dallas City Council has a monumental decision to make: the selection of Dallas’ next city manager.

This has led many to reasonably ask “Who is the best person for this job?” But a more fundamental framing of the question is, “What are our city’s challenges and who is best positioned to address them?” Dallas faces several challenges, distinct yet interrelated in ways that necessitate a holistic, comprehensive response.

Perception

The first challenge is how city government is perceived by our community.

The American statesman Daniel Patrick Moynihan popularized the saying: “Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not his own facts.” While many boast of the greatness of our city, our residents’ sense of the way things are going provides a more realistic depiction.

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Each year, City Hall gauges perceptions of Dallas and its city services. In the most recent survey, just 30% of residents indicated they are pleased with the overall direction of the city, and only 22.4% of residents said they get good value for their tax money, both of which mark a significantly different response from surveys a decade ago. An overwhelming majority also indicated a dire need for improvement in maintenance of infrastructure (like roads and sidewalks), police services, traffic management and social services.

Along with these sentiments, residents have had a front-row seat to the most fractured city manager-mayor relationship in recent Dallas history. Former City Manager T.C. Broadnax and Mayor Eric Johnson did too little to provide a unified strategy to move the city forward. In part that was because the men had very different views on how the city should function. Broadnax wanted the city to lean into equity issues, while Johnson has a more traditional public safety/basic maintenance view. But the deeper trouble was really their inability to sit across from each other and work through differences in a meaningful way. And that’s the first job of leadership.

Their relationship fiasco not only led to unnecessary leadership turnover, it reinforced the perception of a city struggling to unite to address its challenges.

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The next city manager has to be the sort of person who understands that leadership requires collaboration and compromise. And for the city manager role, it involves putting one’s own priorities aside in favor of the policy priorities of the City Council. It means accepting that the council is your boss, and that the mayor is the public face of the council.

Dallas can’t afford another round of management that doesn’t understand that perception often leads to reality in the public eye. Taking steps to project unity and collaboration is a key to success.

Policy

If perception wasn’t daunting enough, the challenge of policy awaits.

Take housing affordability. I’m focusing on this policy issue because it might be the most important signal of Dallas’ future success. Our ability to make sure people at every income level can afford to live within the city limits is absolutely essential to making sure we have the workforce we need to grow and prosper.

Dallas can’t be a city of haves and have-nots. But the way housing prices are going, that’s what we are in danger of becoming.

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The North Central Texas Council of Governments predicts Dallas will grow by more than 330,000 people between now and 2045. Dallas home prices have soared 175% in the last decade while our rental unit supply gap is expected to grow to 83,500 by 2030. As a result, housing market experts suggest “Dallas has a ‘generational need’ for more housing if it aims to keep up with growth.”

More homes mean more housing permits. Yet significant delays in obtaining approval for commercial and residential development permits from City Hall haven’t matched the speed of growth. And even after leaders improve this process, it’s crucial that housing and corollary development be planned and executed in ways that make the city more livable while also softening the negative effects of gentrification.

Getting permitting right is a basic management function. City Hall has seen some improvement in this area, but as we look for a new manager, we need to ensure that we are getting someone who has the managerial ability to recognize a central part of the organization is broken and then move with speed to correct the failure. That’s been lacking at City Hall for too long.

The city’s role in permitting is a relatively small part of the broader housing-price struggle in our city. But it’s an indication of how poor management can exacerbate, rather than ease, a bigger issue.

And we know that housing is just one of many pressing issues that requires a strong management hand.

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Aging infrastructure also hinders our prospects. Even after an upcoming injection of $500 million of bond funding into improving street quality, Dallas needs an additional $100 million to fix its streets.

Or how about crime and public safety? While violent crimes dropped in 2023, Dallas was one of the few major U.S. cities to experience an increase in killings last year at a rate of nearly 19 per 100,000 residents. We also can’t seem to recruit the police officers we need to patrol or respond to residents’ calls at a reasonable rate.

Our fiscal health? Dallas owes $3.4 billion to its police and fire pensions, $1 billion to the city’s Employees’ Retirement Fund and currently faces a $38 million funding gap in its 2024-25 budget.

Past

The list of policy challenges is endless, but it pales in comparison to the final and most difficult challenge: our history and its malign influence on our present and future.

Plato wrote in The Republic that “Any city, however small, is in fact divided into two, one the city of the poor, the other of the rich.” Dallas’ most persistent problem is how to stitch together a city divided by race and class, in part as a direct result of historically discriminatory decisions.

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Of American cities with populations of at least 200,000 residents, Dallas is the 12th most racially segregated city by residence. The most recent American Community Survey indicated 17.8% of Dallas residents live in poverty, with 25.9% of those being children. Two-thirds of Dallas County’s 25-to-34 year olds are unable to earn a living wage. All these numbers are worse for residents of color and those experiencing economic disadvantage. Each aspect directly correlates to past City Hall decisions.

Some suggest that city government should have nothing to do with ameliorating these conditions, but city decisions, the political decisions of our past, engineered these results, and as such, city leaders must play a role in reversing the effects.

It is not only appropriate, it is wholly necessary that our next city manager understand our history and its effects. And that manager must be prepared to use the resources of the city to address the struggles of those who have less, not because of their talents or their efforts, but because the history of our city acts as a weight on their futures.

We need city manager aspirants who can create compelling plans for addressing each of these interwoven challenges. We can be a “world class city,” but we must start by better serving our own citizens. We can significantly improve quality of life, but only if we clearly outline the policies that will help us reach our goals. We can create a better future for our entire city, but only by fully reckoning with the impact of our past.

Dallas is a can-do city, and we expect nothing less from the next leader of City Hall.

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Miguel Solis is a former president of the Dallas Independent School District board of trustees and current president of The Commit Partnership.

Part of our Leading Dallas opinion series, this essay identifies three top issues facing the next city manager.

We welcome your thoughts in a letter to the editor. See the guidelines and submit your letter here. If you have problems with the form, you can submit via email at letters@dallasnews.com



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Game Preview: Dallas Wings vs. Los Angeles Sparks – July 13

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Game Preview: Dallas Wings vs. Los Angeles Sparks – July 13


Game Preview: Dallas Wings vs. Los Angeles Sparks – July 13

Sat, Jul 13, 2024, 2:52 AM

Arlington, TX (July 12, 2024) – The Dallas Wings (5-18) return home for their final two games before the Olympic break, beginning the homestand on Saturday against the Los Angeles Sparks (5-17). Tipoff is slated for 2:30 p.m. CT, with the game airing nationally on CBS. Jordan Kent and Isis Young will be on the call, with Tiffany Blackmon on sideline.

The Wings dropped a two-game road swing in the desert, falling at the Las Vegas Aces on Sunday, 104-85, and at the Phoenix Mercury on Wednesday, 100-84. The Sparks are coming off a pair of home losses, falling to the Mercury on Sunday 84-78 and to the Minnesota Lynx on Tuesday, 82-67.

The Wings and Sparks have met twice so far this season, both times in California. Dallas took Game 1 of the series, 84-83 on May 26, before LA took Game 2, 81-72, on June 7. Arike Ogunbowale led Dallas in scoring on both occasions, while Monique Billings grabbed a team-high 12 boards in each outing.

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How To Follow
Airing nationally on CBS. Follow @DallasWings and @DallasWingsPR for the latest breaking news. Live stats available on stats.wnba.com.

2024 Wings-Sparks Schedule & Results

5/26 at LAS        W, 84-83

6/7 at LAS           L, 72-81

7/13 at DAL        2:30 p.m. CT

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8/25 at DAL        3 p.m. CT

LA leads the all-time series 46-31

 

Game Status Report
Out: Satou Sabally, Dallas Wings (Shoulder)

Out: Jaelyn Brown, Dallas Wings (Illness)

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Out: Maddy Siegrist, Dallas Wings (Finger)

Notable Storylines
Returning Home

Three of the Wings’ five games in July so far have been on the road, with Dallas returning home to the friendly confines of College Park Center for its final two games prior to the Olympic break. The Wings host the Los Angeles Sparks on Saturday before closing out the first half of the season at home against the Indiana Fever on Wednesday. Both remaining games will be nationally televised, with Saturday’s game airing on CBS and Wednesday airing on ESPN. Dallas has won two of its last three home games, including most recently against the Atlanta Dream on July 5.

Mo’s Hometown Matchup

Monique Billings has had two of her top performances of the season come against the Los Angeles Sparks. Billings, who graduated from UCLA and is from nearby Riverside, Calif., has averaged 13.0 points and 12.0 rebounds in two games against the Sparks. In the May 26 meeting, she went for 18 points, 12 rebounds and four assists, before tallying eight points, 12 rebounds and three assists on June 7. Billings spent the preseason on the Sparks roster following six seasons with the Atlanta Dream. She signed a salary cap hardship contract with the Wings on May 17, 2024.

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KDC and University of Dallas Secure Rezoning Approval for Data Center Campus at 'Mobility Crossroads' in Irving

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KDC and University of Dallas Secure Rezoning Approval for Data Center Campus at 'Mobility Crossroads' in Irving


Dallas-based developer KDC and the University of Dallas (UD) have received approval from the Irving City Council on a rezoning application that paves the way for the development of state-of-the-art data centers near the university’s main campus, the companies announced Thursday.

The approved rezoning application allows KDC and UD to partner in the development of a data center campus, responding to the increasing demand driven by the growing use of big data and artificial intelligence.

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KDC CEO Steve Van Amburgh said the real estate development and investment firm has developed more than a dozen significant data center projects over its 35-year company history. “We are thrilled to partner with the University of Dallas to transform their site into a world-class data center campus,” Van Amburgh said in a statement. 

Strategic site advantages

The site, located north of State Highway 114 at Braniff Drive, is positioned at what KDC calls “the mobility crossroads of Dallas-Fort Worth,” with direct access to multiple major highways, DFW Airport, and Love Field.

Eric Hage, KDC executive vice president, highlighted the site’s strategic advantages, noting that Oncor has confirmed that surrounding transmission lines were recently upgraded to offer data center users hyper-scale level power capacity.

“Those factors, combined with extensive access to fiber, make for a unique and exceptional data center campus,” Hage said.

University of Dallas President Jonathan J. Stanford said the university is proud of its association with KDC, given the company’s extensive experience in the City of Irving, and its national portfolio of data centers. “It is heartening to witness the mutual trust amongst the University, KDC, and the City,” Stanford said in a statement.

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KDC said the project is currently in the design phase, with Corgan leading the design team. Key members include Telios as MEP engineer and Kimley-Horn as civil engineer. The completion date is anticipated for early 2027.

As noted, KDC already has a significant presence in Irving, having developed 4.8 million square feet of commercial projects in the city. To date, the company has developed 154 corporate build-to-suit office and industrial projects across the country, totaling more than 37 million square feet. The company’s portfolio includes projects for notable clients such as FedEx, J.P. Morgan Chase, Liberty Mutual, Raytheon, State Farm, Toyota North America, and Volkswagen.

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    The Dallas Public Library’s J. Erik Jonsson Central Library in downtown Dallas—one of America’s largest—was built in 1982 across from Dallas City Hall, and many agree it could use an overhaul. That especially includes library officials and consultants they brought in for a report on the building’s future, among other needed investments in the city’s library system.

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    Dallas Innovates, the Dallas Regional Chamber, and Dallas AI have teamed up to launch the inaugural AI 75 list. The 2024 program honors the most significant people in AI in DFW in seven categories—the visionaries, creators, and influencers you need to know.

  • Dallas Innovates, the Dallas Regional Chamber, and Dallas AI are teaming up to launch the new AI 75 program at Capital Factory’s Future of AI Salon today. The first-ever list will recognize Dallas-Fort Worth innovators in artificial intelligence. Nominations are open through March 20.



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