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Nebraska Football Hosting Open Practice to Support 1890

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Nebraska Football Hosting Open Practice to Support 1890


Nebraska football fans will get an opportunity to see the Huskers in action prior to the season opener and support the official NIL arm at the same time.

NU will hold an open practice—dubbed the Big Red Preview—the evening of Saturday, Aug. 3, in Memorial Stadium. Proceeds from ticket sales will go to 1890.

Fall camp begins three days prior on July 31.

“We’re excited to work with Nebraska Athletics and Husker football in hosting the Big Red Preview,” 1890 Nebraska CEO Carson Schott said. “This will be a great opportunity for Husker fans to take in a summer evening football practice with friends and family while supporting NIL initiatives for our amazing student-athletes.”

Gates for the Big Red Preview event will open at 6 p.m. with practice expected to begin around 6:30. Tickets will be on sale beginning at 10 a.m. on Thursday, July 11, at Huskers.com/tickets. Tickets for the event are $25 each, and all tickets will be mobile. Seating for the Big Red Preview will be general admission.

Dylan Raiola throws a touchdown pass during the 2024 Nebraska football Red-White spring game.

Dylan Raiola throws a touchdown pass during the 2024 Nebraska football Red-White spring game. / Kenny Larabee, KLIN

Proceeds from ticket sales will go to 1890 to support Nebraska student-athletes across all Nebraska Athletics programs. A release adds, “NIL positively impacts student-athletes’ lives and helps Nebraska coaches recruit and retain the best possible talent.”

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Nebraska

Bruce Springsteen on the poetry of his classic album

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Bruce Springsteen on the poetry of his classic album


“I lived in this house exactly half a lifetime ago,” said Bruce Springsteen. It may not look like much, but this small bedroom in Colts Neck, New Jersey, which still sports the original orange shag rug, is where Springsteen made what he considers his masterpiece: his 1982 album “Nebraska,” ten songs dark and mournful. “This is the room where it happened,” he said.

I saw her standing on her front lawn just twirling her baton
Me and her went for a ride, sir, and ten innocent people died
From the town of Lincoln, Nebraska, with a sawed-off .410 on my lap
Through to the badlands of Wyoming I killed everything in my path 

“If I had to pick one album out and say, ‘This is going to represent you 50 years from now,’ I’d pick ‘Nebraska,” he said.  

It was written 42 years ago at a time of great upheaval in Springsteen’s inner life: “I just hit some sort of personal wall that I didn’t even know was there,” he said. “It was my first real major depression where I realized, ‘Oh, I’ve got to do something about it.’”

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Bruce Springsteen, in the Colts Neck, N.J., farmhouse where, in 1982, he recorded the songs for his album “Nebraska.” 

CBS News


Coming off a hugely successful tour for “The River” album, he had his first Top 10 hit, “Hungry Heart.” He was 32, a genuine rock star surrounded by success, and learning its limits.

Axelrod said, “Your rock ‘n’ roll meds, singing in front of 40,000 people, all that is, is anesthesia.”

“Yeah, and it worked for me,” Springsteen said. “I think in your 20s, a lotta things work for you. Your 30s is where you start to become an adult. Suddenly I looked around and said, ‘Where is everything? Where is my home? Where is my partner? Where are the sons or daughters that I thought I might have someday?’ And I realized none of those things are there.

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“So, I said, ‘OK, the first thing I’ve gotta do as soon as I get home is remind myself of who I am and where I came from.”

At the fixed-up farmhouse he was renting, he would try to understand why his success left him so alienated. “This is all inside of me,” he said. “You can either take it and transform it into something positive, or it can destroy you.”  

Author Warren Zanes said, “There are records, films, books that don’t just come in the front door. They come in the back door, they come up through a trap door, and stay with you in life.”

Zanes’ recent book, “Deliver Me from Nowhere,” offers a deep and moving examination of the making of “Nebraska.” 

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Crown


Springsteen’s pain was rooted in a lonely childhood. “Here’s Bruce Springsteen making a record from a kind of bottom in his own life,” said Zanes. “They were very poor.  And then he becomes Bruce Springsteen. He felt that his past was making his present complicated. And he wanted to be freed of it.”

For Springsteen, liberation had always come through writing. While he filled notebook after notebook (“It’s funny, because I don’t remember doing all this work!” he mused, leafing through his writings), the album didn’t come together until late one night when he was channel surfing and stumbled across “Badlands,” Terrence Malick’s film about Charles Starkweather, whose murder spree in 1957 and ’58 unfolded mainly in Nebraska. He said, “I actually called the reporter who had reported on that story in Nebraska. And amazingly enough she was still at the newspaper. And she was a lovely woman, and we talked for a half-hour or so. And it just sort of focused me on the feeling of what I wanted to write about.”

In a serial killer, Springsteen had found a muse:

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I can’t say that I’m sorry for the things that we done
At least for a little while, sir, me and her, we had us some fun …
They wanted to know why I did what I did
Well, sir, I guess there’s just a meanness in this world

“‘There’s a meanness in this world.’ That explains everything Starkweather’s done,” said Axelrod.

“Yeah, I tried to locate where their humanity was, as best as I could,” Springsteen said.

In a surge of creativity, he wrote 15 songs in a matter of weeks, and one January night in 1982, it was time to record, on a 4-track cassette machine. One of rock’s biggest stars sat in this bedroom, alone, and sang, getting exactly the sound he was looking for.

And the acoustics? “Not bad,” Springsteen said. “The orange shag carpet makes it really dead. There’s not a lot of echo. Not only was it beautiful, it came in handy!”

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The bedroom where Springsteen recorded “Nebraska,” still with the original orange shag carpet. 

CBS News


Some songs explored the confusion left from childhood, like “My Father’s House”:

I walked up the steps and stood on the porch
a woman I didn’t recognize came and spoke to me
Through a chained door
I told her my story and who I’d come for
She said “I’m sorry, son, but no one by that name
Lives here anymore”

Springsteen said, “‘Mansion on the Hill,’ ‘My Father’s House,’ ‘Used Cars,’ they’re all written from kids’ perspectives, children trying to make sense of the world that they were born into.”

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Others profiled adults left out, or left behind. The music, Springsteen maintained, possessed a “very stark, dark, lonely sound. Very austere, very bare bones.”  

On a broken-down boom box, Springsteen mixed the songs onto a cassette tape he carried around in his back pocket, for a few weeks. “I hope you had a plastic case on it, at least,” said Axelrod.

“I don’t think I had a case,” he replied. “I’m lucky I didn’t lose it!”

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The Teac 144 4-track cassette deck on which Springsteen recorded the songs. He was the sole musician.  

CBS News

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Springsteen’s band would record what he had on the cassette, but bigger and bolder wasn’t what he was looking for: ”It was a happy accident,” he said. “I had planned to just write some good songs, teach ’em to the band, go into the studio and record them.  But every time I tried to improve on that tape that I had made in that little room? It’s that old story: if this gets any better, it’s gonna get worse.”

Bruce Springsteen wasn’t working E Street, but another road entirely. According to Zanes, “‘Nebraska’ was muddy. It was imperfect. It wasn’t finished. All the things that you shouldn’t put out, he put out.” 

Everything dies, baby, that’s a fact
But maybe everything that dies some day comes back
Put your makeup on, fix your hair up pretty
And meet me tonight in Atlantic City

Axelrod asked, “Did any part of you worry, ‘Oh my goodness, what am I putting out there?’”

“I knew what the ‘Nebraska’ record was,” Springsteen said. “It was also a signal that I was sending that, ‘I’ve had some success, but I do what I want to do. I make the records I wanna make. I’m trying to tell a bigger story, and that’s the job that I’m trying to do for you.’”

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A few more songs that didn’t make the cut? You probably heard them later, including “Born in the U.S.A.,” “Pink Cadillac,” and “Downbound Train” – songs the guy in the leather jacket who’d written of chrome-wheeled fuel-injected suicide machines kept in a binder with Snoopy on the cover.

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Yes, notes for the Boss’ songs were kept in a Peanuts binder. 

CBS News


In that small bedroom, Springsteen the rocker made an album that fleshed out Springsteen the poet. Imagine for a moment if he hadn’t. Axelrod mused, “And then people might be assessing a career and say, ‘Oh, it was great, man, 70,000 people singing “Rosalita” in the stadium.’ But that might have been closer to where it ended in considering what you’ve done.” 

“Yeah. I was just interested in more, in more than that,” Springsteen said. “I love doin’ it. I still love doin’ it to this day. But I wanted more than that.”

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“If they want to enjoy your work, try anything; if they want to understand your work, try ‘Nebraska’?” asked Axelrod.

“Yeah, I’d agree with that,” he replied. “I’d definitely agree with that.”  

An earlier version of this story was originally broadcast on April 30, 2023.   

     
READ AN EXCERPT: “Deliver Me from Nowhere: The Making of Bruce Springsteen’s ‘Nebraska’”

You can stream “Nebraska” by Bruce Springsteen by clicking on the embed below (Free Spotify registration required to hear the tracks in full):

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For more info:

     
Story produced by Jason Sacca. Editor: Ed Givnish. 

     
See also: 


Barack Obama and Bruce Springsteen talk “Renegades”

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An enjoyable weather weekend before the start of a warm trend coming up across Greater Nebraska

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An enjoyable weather weekend before the start of a warm trend coming up across Greater Nebraska


NORTH PLATTE, Neb. (KNOP) – For across Greater Nebraska highs will range from the upper 70s to the upper 80s through early next week before the start of a warm trend with temperatures getting up into the 90s.

This weekend brings cooler air, but we will not get rid of our moisture chances. Saturday and Sunday look for partly cloudy skies with a 20-30% chance of storms both days; highs will be in the low – mid 80s.

A nice Sunday to finish the weekend across Greater Nebraska.(Maxuser | Justin Craft)

Then for Monday expect mostly sunny skies with a chance of showers/t-storms and highs near 81. Tuesday the mostly sunny skies stick around; highs will still be slightly cool for this time of year as we top off in the lower 80s.

A chance of showers/thunderstorms for Monday.
A chance of showers/thunderstorms for Monday.(Maxuser | Justin Craft)

Wednesday sunny skies and highs in the upper 80s. Thursday mostly sunny skies with highs in the low 90s. Friday sunny skies and highs in the low-mid 90s. Next Saturday highs in the low 90s.

A warm and dry trend is coming up for Greater Nebraska.
A warm and dry trend is coming up for Greater Nebraska.(Maxuser | Justin Craft)

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Big Ten primer: Nebraska's greatest football moment

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Big Ten primer: Nebraska's greatest football moment


Big Ten media days are upon us. The festivities begin in Indianapolis on July 23. USC will be there. It’s time for the Trojans to get to know their Big Ten neighbors, even the ones which only recently moved into the neighborhood. Nebraska has not been a longtime Big Ten school, so the program’s greatest football moments naturally occurred long before Big Ten membership existed.

Nebraska was an elite college football program from the early 1960s through the 2002 Rose Bowl against Miami, a period of roughly 40 years. In that 40-year period, which moment was the biggest?

There are three candidates. One is the 1994 national championship victory over Miami in the 1995 Orange Bowl. That moment carries emotional weight in Nebraska because coach Tom Osborne, after more than 20 years of trying, finally won his first national championship. That might be the most meaningful moment in Nebraska football history.

The 1996 Fiesta Bowl win over Florida confirmed the 1995 Huskers as the greatest college football team in modern times. Only 2001 Miami rivals Nebraska in terms of juggernaut-level talent. Anyone who saw that 1995 NU team knows it is one of the greatest teams ever assembled.

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Yet, the greatest moment — both profoundly satisfying within the Nebraska family yet resonant and important on a national scale — might be the 1971 Thanksgiving game against the Oklahoma Sooners. In a back-and-forth classic, the Huskers had the final say, winning 35-31 against their storied rival on the prairie. The game is still talked about more than 50 years later. It was called a “Game of the Century,” as were a select few other college football games of the era. This one lived up to the billing more than any other.

Having defeated Oklahoma in an epic battle, the 1972 Orange Bowl was comparatively easy for NU. Nebraska crushed Bear Bryant’s Alabama team 38-6 to complete a 13-0 season and win the national title. The 1971 Huskers were back-to-back champions. A program which was irrelevant 10 years earlier had truly become a colossus under patriarch Bob Devaney, who then handed the reins to Osborne to continue Nebraska’s long reign as a college football power.

You can’t really go wrong choosing any of those options, but we’ll take 1971, if only because that moment established Nebraska football at an elite level. Osborne’s successes might have been more spectacular, but they stood on the shoulders of what Bob Devaney started in Lincoln.

Visit our friends at Fighting Irish Wire, Buffaloes Wire, and Ducks Wire. Follow our newest sites, UW Huskies Wire and UCLA Wire.

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