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THE FLASH Reviews Are In And It Definitely Doesn’t Sound Like The Best Superhero Movie Ever Made

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THE FLASH Reviews Are In And It Definitely Doesn’t Sound Like The Best Superhero Movie Ever Made

Earlier this year, DC Studios boss James Gunn called The Flash “one of the best superhero movies I’ve ever seen.” Warner Bros. CEO David Zaslav later added to that by saying it’s “the best superhero movie I’ve ever seen,” while celebrities like Tom Cruise and Stephen King have also given it the thumbs up.

Alas, the first reviews are telling a very different story. 

While these verdicts are by no means as bad as those for Black Adam, the movie is receiving reviews primarily in the 3* range and below. Fan sites certainly seem to have appreciated it more (suggesting there could be a divide between fans and critics) but social media reactions had many believing The Flash would receive the same sort of universal praise as Spider-Man: Across the Spider-Verse

We’ve compiled reviews from a wide range of sources below, but the overall consensus seems to be it’s a good, not great, DCEU movie (calling it the best of those feels like faint praise) which struggles to do Barry Allen justice. It’s worth noting that the special effects sound hit-and-miss, as does the time-travel story. There are also those who had an understandably hard time looking past the accusations surrounding Ezra Miller.

On the plus side, these verdicts suggest there’s fun to be had and heaps of fan service. Despite that, the widely discussed “secret ending” is coming under fire and may not land as expected. 

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Read through some of the reviews below and check back here soon for our verdict. 

The thing is, none of it makes a lot of sense. In ‘The Flash,’ the multiverse of possibilities that opens up by toying with the past becomes an excuse to throw everything but the Batcave sink at the audience. Despite the vividness of Ezra Miller, the movie steamrolls Miller’s personality as it goes along. – Variety

The early word on The Flash calling it one of the greatest superhero movies ever made was pure hyperbole. But in the bumpy recent history of the DC Extended Universe, it’s certainly an above-average entry. – The Hollywood Reporter

What it amounts to is a movie that spends all its time racing from one poorly-thought out story element to another, from one only modestly satisfying nostalgia shout-out to another, and with only questionable results. How fitting, yet how disappointing: ‘The Flash’ has the runs. – The Wrap

It has taken so long for a feature-length ‘The Flash’ to finally hit theaters, and he’s too late. Barry is barely the lead character of his own movie. [C] – The Playlist

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What’s less persuasive is the CGI, an eyesore that’s particularly gaudy when the finale’s ‘secrets’ drop. The tone is similarly choppy, especially in a climactic punchline that clashes with the film’s emotive developments. With just Aquaman’s return incoming, the result is a movie that suggests this DCEU had promise, even if its directors couldn’t quite focus it. Time to pass the baton… [3/5] – Total Film

In its best moments, ‘The Flash’ touches on something new and exciting, but too often, its the past that tugs on, keeping it from speeding ahead. [B-] – IndieWire

[This] is not a movie with any new ideas or dramatic rethinking, and – at the risk of re-opening the DC/Marvel sectarian wound – nothing to compare with the much-lauded animation experiment in the recent Spider-Man films. The intellect in this intellectual property is draining away. [2/5] – The Guardian

The Flash ends on a purposefully open note (and a pretty good joke), so that if the film succeeds at the box office, Miller’s Barry can run again another day. If it doesn’t, the precedent is set for a full continuity reset. Whatever DC movies await us in the future, let’s hope they avoid multiverses. It’s well-trod territory at this point, even for a speedster. [C+] – Entertainment Weekly

While I have a few complaints and there are a couple of head-scratching loose ends, “The Flash” is still a funny, emotional, action-heavy crowd-pleaser that ranks among the best DC movies ever made. [7.5/10] – Slash Film

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Whether or not this was all worth the long development saga and the troubles with its star will, of course, be for individual fans to decide, but there is undeniable entertainment value in The Flash. It’s sometimes buried under layers and layers of storytelling knots that the film never fully untangles, but the fun is there, and when the film is really working, that turns out to be enough. – The AV Club

The Flash may have an unwieldy third act and indulges in too much unearned fan service, but that doesn’t stop it from being an entertaining and earnest DC superhero film. [7/10] – IGN

[If] a film can give you things that are exciting and heartfelt, all while you laugh and smile along, that’s hard to beat. And The Flash is definitely hard to beat in the conversation of the best DC movies of this era. – Gizmodo

[They] never consider that the time travel aspects make absolutely no sense, and only hurts the larger story in the way that it’s handled here. Thankfully, those antics are enjoyable and hard not to get excited about, but unfortunately, this isn’t a story that holds together on a narrative level. Cameos and fan service are fine to have, but the story has to be there to back them up, and it’s not quite there with The Flash. [C+] – Collider

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Movie Reviews

Peddha Kapu 1 Review, USA Premiere Report

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Peddha Kapu 1 Review, USA Premiere Report

Final Report:

Peddha Kapu offers solid technical values and supporting cast, but the core story, emotions, and drama are lost in the confusing narration. Director Srikanth Addala’s comeback is a mixed bag.

First Half Report:

Despite superb visuals and a solid score, Peddha Kapu feels a bit all over the place in the first half but still maintains intrigue. Hopefully, the second half will provide less confusion and more clarity on character arcs and the core plot.

— Peddha Kapu show started with an intense, chaotic action sequence in a village, setting up the perfect beginning for the drama. Stay tuned for the first half report.

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Stay tuned for Peddha Kapu 1 Movie Review, USA Premiere Report.

Peddha Kapu 1 is directed by Srikanth Addala, marking his return after a long hiatus since “Brahmotsavam” in 2016. The film features Virat Karrna, Pragati Srivastava, Rao Ramesh, and Tanikella Bharani in lead roles. Srikanth Addala, known for his soft genre films, is making a comeback with this intense film, and the trailer has raised expectations for the movie.

Cast and crew : Virat karrna, Pragati srivasthava, Rao Ramesh, Naga Babu, Tanikella Bharani, Brigada saga, Rajeev kanakala, Anusuya, Eeshwari Rao, Naren

Producer : Miryala ravinder reddy
Director: Srikanth Addala

Dop : Chota K Naidu
Music : Mickey J meyer
Fights : Peter Hein
Editor : Marthand K Venkatesh
Art : GM Sekhar
Dance Master : Raju sundaram

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Movie Reviews

Believer, The | Reelviews Movie Reviews

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Believer, The | Reelviews Movie Reviews

When one speaks of cultural relevance, some movies capture
it in the moment (oftentimes dating the production in the process). Others
grasp it as if looking in a rearview mirror. But there’s a small group, either
through clairvoyance or happenstance, that achieve it years or decades ahead of
time. The Believer is one such film; its themes seem more relevant two
decades after its release than they did when it reached theaters in 2001.

The directorial debut of Henry Bean (who wrote the
screenplays for both Internal Affairs – the good – and Basic Instinct 2 – the bad) offers numerous challenging ideas but falls short when it
comes to character development and motivation. The narrative is scattershot –
events happen too quickly, transitions are frequently missing or truncated, and
certain aspects aren’t believable. Although the movie uses flashbacks to
explore why the main character, Danny Balint (Ryan Gosling), has adopted the
philosophies he espouses, there’s still something missing.

Danny grew up Jewish but, as a child, he pushed back against
orthodox interpretations of the Torah. As an adult, he has repudiated Judaism
altogether, opting to become a neo-Nazi and partnering with 21st
century fascists Curtis Zampf (Billy Zane) and Lina Moebius (Theresa Russell).
Although Curtis and Lina disagree with Danny’s virulent antisemitism (they
perceive fascism as an economic and political philosophy not necessarily tied
to race), they are impressed by his passion and oratorical skills and believe
he can be an asset to the movement. After beginning a relationship with Lina’s
daughter, Carla (Summer Phoenix), who is also sleeping with Curtis, Danny exhibits
conflicted emotions regarding Jewish iconography. Although he violently attacks
a Jew in the streets and attempts to shoot another, he shows a fascination for
the Torah and, at her request, begins to teach Carla Hebrew. Danny’s evolving
conflict is evident in a bizarre scene where he combines a Nazi salute with a
Hagabah.

Although The Believer does an adequate job
postulating how a disaffected Jewish youth might not only repudiate his
heritage but become hostile toward it, the film does not effectively flesh out
Danny as a fully formed individual. Oftentimes, he appears more like a writer’s
construct. The situation is exacerbated with Carla – a lifelong fascist, her
sudden fascination with Judaism is inexplicable and unexplained. Her character
represents one of The Believer’s biggest problems because everything
about her is forced and artificial. Her motivations are as obtuse as her
feelings about Danny and Curtis. When asked by Danny why she is with him while
also sleeping with Curtis, she responds that the sex is better with Danny.

I was not as impressed with Ryan Gosling’s performance as were
many of the contemporaneous critics who reviewed the film, although I agree
that there are several scenes in which his intensity is frighteningly effective,
the most notable being during a confrontation with journalist Guy Danielsen
(A.D. Miles), when Danny brandishes a gun. Overall, however, I found Gosling’s
acting to be uneven, but I acknowledge that this could be more the fault of the
screenplay than the performer.