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‘A Hard Day’s Night’ 4K Ultra HD movie review

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‘A Hard Day’s Night’ 4K Ultra HD movie review

Whereas immersed within the lately launched Blu-ray set “The Beatles: Get Again,” followers on the lookout for an ideal complement will admire a have a look at the early days of the group when additionally they donned the roles of film stars within the ground-breaking A Arduous Day’s Night time (Criterion, not rated, 1.75:1 facet ratio, 88 minutes, $49.95), obtainable within the ultra-high definition format.

In fact, the Fab 4 took the world by storm within the early Nineteen Sixties and cemented their place in popular culture with director Richard Lester’s 1964 black-and-white, musical comedy that combined avant-garde humor, frenetic dialogue and music video-style segments whereas all delivered in a documentary fashion format.

John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr play themselves almost on the pinnacle of their profession and begin their nonstop shenanigans with the long-lasting scene of the boys operating and stumbling away from their followers to the movie’s famed theme tune.

Roaming round England, they catch a practice to London to play a live performance at an Ed Sullivan-style tv program getting in hassle with the meticulous director (Victor Spinetti).

Throughout all the journey, Paul will get saddled along with his feisty and grumpy grandfather (Wilfrid Brambell) who causes hassle whereas tagging alongside.

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He even encourages Ringo to take pleasure in life away from the band, inflicting the drummer to vanish after which reappear simply in time for the Beatles to carry out within the stay present.

Followers of the group in addition to followers of Marx Brothers-style comedy will relish watching the musicians on display who’re clearly having an excessive amount of enjoyable.

Moments similar to The Beatles dancing to their very own music in a discotheque and Lennon taking part in with toy boats whereas taking a bubble tub combine with loads of snappy dialogue.

For instance, a reporter asks Harrison “what do you name that haircut?” He doesn’t even blink as he responds, “Arthur.”

The comedic chaos will get dutifully anchored by a few of the finest pop songs ever written. The licensed hit parade consists of “If I Fell,” “Can’t Purchase Me Love,” “She Loves You,” “Inform Me Why” and, after all, “A Arduous Days Night time.”

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4K in motion: The meticulous 2160p restoration truly occurred again in 2014 for Criterion’s Blu-ray launch of the film.

Permitted by director Richard Lester, the digital switch was created in 4K decision from the 35mm unique digicam destructive and two 35mm fine-grain grasp positives with in depth work completed to take away any scratches, filth, particles and blemishes.

The result’s a wonderfully toned, vibrant masterpiece that not solely reveals element right down to the boys’ perspire however almost appears to be like prefer it was shot with the extreme crispness of Nineteen Sixties video cameras.

Greatest extras: Criterion presents the 4K and Blu-ray disc of the movie with Blu-ray gathering all the goodies culled from the 2014 launch.

Begin with an information-packed compilation optionally available commentary monitor (produced by Beatles historian Martin Lewis in 2002) that features actors John Junkin (Shake), David Janson and Jeremy Lloyd, assistant editors Pamela Tomling and Roy Benson and cinematographer Gilbert Taylor simply to call a number of of the 15 people participating.

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Subsequent, watch a virtually hourlong retrospective from 1994 hosted by Phil Collins (who truly appeared within the film’s TV viewers as a baby), that includes Lester, producer Walter Shenson, screenwriter Alun Owen, Spinetti, costume designer Julie Harris and movie critic Roger Ebert that additionally consists of an additional tune from the present “You Can’t Do That,” All of them supply a great deal of reminiscences and loads of manufacturing particulars.

Hold going with a 36-minute documentary from 2002, once more loaded with manufacturing nostalgia, that provides one other overview of the movie with interviews from Lester, George Martin, Mr. Shenson, United Artist VP David Picker, Mr. Owen, affiliate producer Denis O’Dell, assistant editor Roy Benson, hairdresser Betty Glasow, nonetheless photographer/poster maker Robert Freman, membership dancer Jeremy Lloyd, actress Anna Quayle, cameraman Paul Wilson and Mr. Taylor.

Subsequent, dive into 27 minutes on Lester’s profession and even 9 explanation why he was your best option for the director position together with his expertise with utilizing frantic tv methods discovered whereas engaged on The Goons (a famed British sketch comedy legends) present.

Viewers may also watch his 1959 Academy Award-nominated brief “The Working Leaping & Standing Nonetheless Movie,” starring Peter Sellers and Spike Milligan no much less.

Spherical out the immersion with 18-minutes of the group doing interviews in regards to the movie in 1964 as they contact on writing “A Arduous Day’s Night time,” guffawing throughout takes and their consolation stage seeing themselves on a big theater display.

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The cavalcade of extras additionally has an evaluation of 5 of the songs and a 28-minute interview with Beatles writer Mark Lewisohn performed in 2014.

Moreover, deep breath, the bundle comprises an 80-page, photo-illustrated booklet that features an essay by movie critic Howard Hampton, a classic interview with Lester and a few clarification on the restoration.

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Movie Reviews

Movie Review: Pedda Kapu -1 – Gulte

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Movie Review: Pedda Kapu -1 – Gulte

2/5


2 Hr 29 Mins   |   Action Rural   |   29-09-2023


Cast – Virat Karrna, Pragathi Shrivatsav, Rao Ramesh, Naga Babu, Anasuya

Director – Srikanth Addala

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Producer – Miryala Ravinder Reddy

Banner – Dwaraka Creations

Music – Mickey J Meyer

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Post Brahmotsavam debacle, director Srikanth Addala shifts to bold and rustic content. His previous one was Narappa (Asuran remake) with Venkatesh. Now, he comes up with Pedda Kapu that marks the launch of Virat Karrna as the male lead. Will Srikanth score success and cement his position?

Plot

Set in 1980s in a fictional village near Rajahmundry where caste politics and family feuds rule, Peddha Kapu (Virat Karrna) fights against oppression in the village by two power centres – Satya Rangayya (Rao Ramesh) and Bhaiyanna (Aadukalam Naren). How things drastically changed after NT Ramarao starts political party in 1982. How Peddha Kapu settles all the scores by taking on mighty Satya Rangayya and Bhaiyanna is the story. Who is Akkamma (Anasuya) and how is she involved?

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Performances

Debutante Virat Karna has made a decent performance. He scored points in action scenes, while he underscored in emotional scenes. Rao Ramesh is best-suited for the role of a crooked villain and selfish politician set in rural milieu. His mannerisms and behaviour create an aura. Pragati Srivastava plays a rural belle and she pulls it off well. She was abandoned by her parents which gives emotional depth. But she is jovial and extroverted. Her character has a twist to the story. Barring this, she doesn’t have much scope to perform. Tanikella Bharani is seen as a drunkard who is vexed with caste and opportunistic politics. He is presented as a person who cares for society and the village. Naga Babu is seen as party incharge. His character is largely involved in bringing Satya Rangayya and Bhaiyyana together to create peace in the village. Anasuya as Akkamma has got a meaty role. There was a lot of hype around her role. But it didn’t translate as expected. Her character couldn’t leave the desired impact. As a villain, Srikanth Addala leaves half-impact. Rajeev Kanakala and Easwari play the parents of Pedda Kapu. They have nothing much to add value to the story. Overall, some performances are over-played and some are too subtle. This uneven in the cast’s performances confuses the viewers.

Technicalities

Pedda Kapu sounds and looks quite ambitious, thanks to visuals, production design and the scale of the film involving large canvas and huge crowd in camera frames. But this suffers with its writing. Director banks on cinematography, background music technically. Songs have failed miserably. Mickey J Meyer couldn’t do the magic. After listening to songs, Mickey was the wrong choice for this genre. The slow-paced narration is yet another shortcoming.

Highlights

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Visuals
Rural Set-Up & BGM

Drawbacks

Brutal Violence
Stretched Out Drama
Disconnecting Emotion
Slow & Predictable Narration
Songs

Analysis

Rangasthalam, a film set in rural backdrop involving caste politics, turned the Tollywood’s landscape. Allu Arjun’s Pushpa is also the rise of a common man against all the odds in rural setting. The blockbuster result of these films gave huge breather to big-budget rural backdrop movies. Nani travelled the same path with Dasara (again village domination politics and rustic backdrop) and yet again scored success. Even films like Palsa and Uppena has lower-caste and oppression as the core-elements in their plots. And Telugu Cinema has quite familiar with this lower-caste and self-respect theme. Director Srikanth Addala is a late entrant who catches the trend a bit late. After remaking Narappa, Srikanth seems to have believed there is still room to explore this genre.

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With Pedda Kapu, Srikanth largely banks upon bold content. He chose raw and rustic content. There was no supporting base (story) to add weight to the raw, rustic content. On top of it, director has gone overboard. The violence is what drives Pedda Kapu with scenes of head-chopping. Blood and gory was all over. All this indicate Pedda Kapu is intentionally a bold attempt. The film has got large canvas, big scale with prominent cast, technicians. But it couldn’t work.

‘Meeku Ante Vunte, Maaku Entha Vandali’, this dialogue sums up the Peddha Kapu’s plight. The first half is decent and promises to be somewhat intense. The interval scene was spine-chilling and gives some high. But the second-half of the film nosedives, leaving audience disappointed. There is a twist as well involving Akkamma (Anasuya). But this twist and following consequences didn’t pan out as it was intended. After Akkamma, the film turns out to be predictable. The climax portions are not engaging. The whole story is narrated in confusing way. The drama has been stretched out without the engaging scenes and without depth. It is only build-up and elevation with BGM. There was no supporting base. Pedda Kapu might be ambitious and intended to become a big film, but it falters marginally in terms of narration. For debutante Virat Karna it is not the end of the world and it is a decent start, for Srikanth Addala, Pedda Kapu is certainly a blow.

Verdict: Addala’s ‘Mass’ter Stroke!

Rating: 2/5

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Movie Reviews

Peddha Kapu 1 Review, USA Premiere Report

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Peddha Kapu 1 Review, USA Premiere Report

Final Report:

Peddha Kapu offers solid technical values and supporting cast, but the core story, emotions, and drama are lost in the confusing narration. Director Srikanth Addala’s comeback is a mixed bag.

First Half Report:

Despite superb visuals and a solid score, Peddha Kapu feels a bit all over the place in the first half but still maintains intrigue. Hopefully, the second half will provide less confusion and more clarity on character arcs and the core plot.

— Peddha Kapu show started with an intense, chaotic action sequence in a village, setting up the perfect beginning for the drama. Stay tuned for the first half report.

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Stay tuned for Peddha Kapu 1 Movie Review, USA Premiere Report.

Peddha Kapu 1 is directed by Srikanth Addala, marking his return after a long hiatus since “Brahmotsavam” in 2016. The film features Virat Karrna, Pragati Srivastava, Rao Ramesh, and Tanikella Bharani in lead roles. Srikanth Addala, known for his soft genre films, is making a comeback with this intense film, and the trailer has raised expectations for the movie.

Cast and crew : Virat karrna, Pragati srivasthava, Rao Ramesh, Naga Babu, Tanikella Bharani, Brigada saga, Rajeev kanakala, Anusuya, Eeshwari Rao, Naren

Producer : Miryala ravinder reddy
Director: Srikanth Addala

Dop : Chota K Naidu
Music : Mickey J meyer
Fights : Peter Hein
Editor : Marthand K Venkatesh
Art : GM Sekhar
Dance Master : Raju sundaram

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Movie Reviews

Believer, The | Reelviews Movie Reviews

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Believer, The | Reelviews Movie Reviews

When one speaks of cultural relevance, some movies capture
it in the moment (oftentimes dating the production in the process). Others
grasp it as if looking in a rearview mirror. But there’s a small group, either
through clairvoyance or happenstance, that achieve it years or decades ahead of
time. The Believer is one such film; its themes seem more relevant two
decades after its release than they did when it reached theaters in 2001.

The directorial debut of Henry Bean (who wrote the
screenplays for both Internal Affairs – the good – and Basic Instinct 2 – the bad) offers numerous challenging ideas but falls short when it
comes to character development and motivation. The narrative is scattershot –
events happen too quickly, transitions are frequently missing or truncated, and
certain aspects aren’t believable. Although the movie uses flashbacks to
explore why the main character, Danny Balint (Ryan Gosling), has adopted the
philosophies he espouses, there’s still something missing.

Danny grew up Jewish but, as a child, he pushed back against
orthodox interpretations of the Torah. As an adult, he has repudiated Judaism
altogether, opting to become a neo-Nazi and partnering with 21st
century fascists Curtis Zampf (Billy Zane) and Lina Moebius (Theresa Russell).
Although Curtis and Lina disagree with Danny’s virulent antisemitism (they
perceive fascism as an economic and political philosophy not necessarily tied
to race), they are impressed by his passion and oratorical skills and believe
he can be an asset to the movement. After beginning a relationship with Lina’s
daughter, Carla (Summer Phoenix), who is also sleeping with Curtis, Danny exhibits
conflicted emotions regarding Jewish iconography. Although he violently attacks
a Jew in the streets and attempts to shoot another, he shows a fascination for
the Torah and, at her request, begins to teach Carla Hebrew. Danny’s evolving
conflict is evident in a bizarre scene where he combines a Nazi salute with a
Hagabah.

Although The Believer does an adequate job
postulating how a disaffected Jewish youth might not only repudiate his
heritage but become hostile toward it, the film does not effectively flesh out
Danny as a fully formed individual. Oftentimes, he appears more like a writer’s
construct. The situation is exacerbated with Carla – a lifelong fascist, her
sudden fascination with Judaism is inexplicable and unexplained. Her character
represents one of The Believer’s biggest problems because everything
about her is forced and artificial. Her motivations are as obtuse as her
feelings about Danny and Curtis. When asked by Danny why she is with him while
also sleeping with Curtis, she responds that the sex is better with Danny.

I was not as impressed with Ryan Gosling’s performance as were
many of the contemporaneous critics who reviewed the film, although I agree
that there are several scenes in which his intensity is frighteningly effective,
the most notable being during a confrontation with journalist Guy Danielsen
(A.D. Miles), when Danny brandishes a gun. Overall, however, I found Gosling’s
acting to be uneven, but I acknowledge that this could be more the fault of the
screenplay than the performer.